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quixote100104
01-05-2010, 02:58 PM
Greetings :-),

On my Star Trek Simm, I use a motto attributed to the Apollo 1 memorial at Cape Canaverel: "Ad Astra Per Aspera (A rough road leads to the stars)"

Someone has recently told me that this is incorrect and it should read: "To the stars through difficulties"

I don't speak, read or write Latin (though I've heard there some variance in translation) and have never been to the Cape. I actually drew the inspiration from the film "Armageddon" ;-).

Can anyone tell me which translation is correct and, if mine is incorrect, how one would write "A Rough Road Leads To The Stars" properly in Latin?

Thanks :-)

kuwisdelu
01-05-2010, 04:35 PM
The second translation is correct. "To the stars, through difficulties."

I don't have a latin dictionary on me at the moment, though.

kuwisdelu
01-05-2010, 04:41 PM
Asper via adducit astra.

Or, Asper via ducit ad astra.

I believe. Someone correct me.

maryland
01-05-2010, 05:26 PM
I might be adding to the difficulties here, but if I remember correctly, the motto of the Royal Air Force is 'Per Ardua Ad Astra.'
The rough version was 'To the stars through bolts and bars.' (Quite poetic)
The real translation was 'Through difficulty to the stars.'
Hope this doesn't mix you up further.

RobinGBrown
01-06-2010, 12:24 PM
Checking a Latin>English transaltion online aspera can be interpreted as rough.

So Per aspera ad astra can be translated as in the OP given some poetic license

Being British the phrase Per ardua ad astra is the one I'm more familair with

Try this: http://miljokes.com/lqote.html - although there's a LOT of poetic licence (AKA very bad translation) in many of these


Greetings :-),
On my Star Trek Simm, I use a motto attributed to the Apollo 1 memorial at Cape Canaverel: "Ad Astra Per Aspera (A rough road leads to the stars)"

Someone has recently told me that this is incorrect and it should read: "To the stars through difficulties"

Most people don't have a clue about latin, so I'd guess that the person who told you this was just trying to annoy you, or is an idiot.

The use of latin mottos is a grand military tradition and a lot of traditions don't have to make complete sense.

kuwisdelu
01-07-2010, 09:09 PM
Aspera via adducit astra.

Or, Aspera via ducit ad astra.

Forgive me. Can't have a masculine adjective on a feminine noun. :D

kuwisdelu
01-07-2010, 09:12 PM
Checking a Latin>English transaltion online aspera can be interpreted as rough.

So Per aspera ad astra can be translated as in the OP given some poetic license

Being British the phrase Per ardua ad astra is the one I'm more familair with

Try this: http://miljokes.com/lqote.html - although there's a LOT of poetic licence (AKA very bad translation) in many of these

Most people don't have a clue about latin, so I'd guess that the person who told you this was just trying to annoy you, or is an idiot.

The use of latin mottos is a grand military tradition and a lot of traditions don't have to make complete sense.

Both aspera and ardua can be translated as either rough or difficult. However neither the words "road" (via) nor "to lead to" (adduco, adducere) appear in the original phrase.

RobinGBrown
01-08-2010, 12:52 PM
Large doses of poetic licence are usually applied to latin mottos