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TwentyFour
12-14-2006, 12:11 AM
cc

beezle
12-14-2006, 09:24 AM
I've only recently gotten to his writing, and so far, I like. I started with some of his short fiction collections, and then The Dark Tower. Maybe The Stand next?

Mandy-Jane
12-14-2006, 02:23 PM
I love Stephen King too. The Shining was very scary; The Stand was horrific; Pet Semetary frightening; Christine ..... I've run out of adjectives. I'm not a horror fan as such, but he writes in a way that makes it all almost believable. He's great.

alleycat
12-14-2006, 02:43 PM
I've only recently gotten to his writing, and so far, I like. I started with some of his short fiction collections, and then The Dark Tower. Maybe The Stand next?
Two of my favorite King books of the "scary type" are The Dead Zone and Delores Claiborne.

I recently read The Colorado Kid. It was okay, but I expected more.

beezle
12-14-2006, 02:47 PM
Ah, The Dead Zone. I really like the movie. Now, that's one of the reasons that has kept me off him for so long... just about everything's been made into a movie, most of them bad, and I've seen them all. Few surprises left.

alleycat
12-14-2006, 02:49 PM
If you haven't read it already, you would probably enjoy Everything's Eventual, three or four of the stories are really good.

Mandy-Jane
12-14-2006, 02:56 PM
....Misery - terrifying; The Dark Half - startling; It - shocking .....

VeggieChick
12-14-2006, 08:54 PM
Salem's Lot is one of my favorite horror books of all time.

C.bronco
12-14-2006, 09:01 PM
I remember when my Mom took my brother and me to see The Shining, our first R-movie. I was 11. It scared the bejesus out of me; I slept with the light on that night and made my big brother sleep on the floor of my room! I read the book immediately afterward. I've been hooked on Stephen King since.

Gray
12-14-2006, 11:49 PM
Needful things...brilliant. If you haven't read it yet, I highly recomend it.

Akuma
12-15-2006, 12:17 AM
I also recommend 'Everything's Eventual'.
One of the stories played off my biggest fears--still having awareness of sensation and thought even after you're dead.

And then the mortician arrives...

alleycat
12-15-2006, 12:30 AM
I also recommend 'Everything's Eventual'.
One of the stories played off my biggest fears--still having awareness of sensation and thought even after you're dead.

And then the mortician arrives...
Oh, then you'd just love Poe's The Case of M. Valdemar.

In that story, a man is hypnotized as an experiment right before he dies.

Southern_girl29
12-15-2006, 12:52 AM
My first brush with Stephen King was watching Pet Semetery in the seventh grade. It scared me so bad I couldn't be by myself for days afterward. I didn't get the courage to read the book until much later. When I tried to read the Shining, it scared me so much that I had to put it down for a while. My DH was out of town at the time, and I couldn't do it when I was there by myself.

Bag of Bones is probably one of my favorites by him. But, The Stand is one of my all-time favorites.

underthecity
12-15-2006, 01:50 AM
The first King book I ever read, which was also the among the first "adult" novels I read, was Christine. This was 1984. I was 14 and in 7th grade. A friend of mine and I had recently gotten into cars and he had just read Christine and raved about it. I read it and really liked it. I loved the story, the characters, and especially the scary, murderous car.

I read The Shining next and loved it. Loved it loved it loved it. I stayed up late nights reading it, unable to put it down. It made me eager to see the movie of which I had seen bits and pieces on TV. I rented it (on Beta!) and was disappointed in the treatment. I couldn't understand why the movie so different from the book. It was scary, but not the same.

The Shining (book) was influential to me. I had written maybe a few short things by that point, but after I read The Shining, I knew I wanted to write like that: a great story, scary, suspenseful, and memorable characters. (And I've never really accomplished it yet.)

The Shining is one of my favorite books of all time. The Shining (movie) is one of my favorite movies of all time. Stanley Kubrick is my all-time favorite director, and later I appreciated the film more by not comparing it to the book. Kubrick took King's story and made it into his own vision, resulting in a terrifying horror movie that stands on its own.

But without King's book, Kubrick's The Shining never would have been made.

allen

Sassenach
12-15-2006, 02:25 AM
I never slept on a plane flight since reading "Langoliers."

Angelus
12-15-2006, 08:04 AM
Stephen King fan here. I can nit pick at his writing, he does go on and on and on and...But, no writer can get you to stop eating your pop tarts and pay attention.
The Stand: Brilliant
The Shining: Literally his best fiction
The Gunslinger Books: Close but no Tolkien.
Salem's Lot: My favorite, I love the simplicity of it.
Misery: He can write fiction that doesn't involve spooks, unless you consider Annie a spook, and wouldn't argue
Needfull Things: Sinister, with a sense of irony
Insomnia: Wicked and the only strange that King does so well
The Tommyknockers: Brilliant, man that story takes a long time, but it is well worth the time
Everything's Eventual: Love all of them
From a Buick 8: good storytelling
Dreamcatcher: King is the master of gross, and so he is with this book
The Dead Zone: weak but effective
Firestarter: Weak but effective
The Stand: he doesn't need Tolkien
It: way too long, never will re read that one.
Night Shift: treats and more treats, love them all
Skeleton Crew: not so many treats, but still some brilliant stuff
Carrie: started it all, and everything in that novel explains a lot about the other novels
Salem's Lot (again): That was a vampire story, no mistake, there was nothing else there, simply a vampire story. Love it, read once a year.
Haven't read Gerald's Game or The Girl who loved...don't recall.

Mandy-Jane
12-15-2006, 08:06 AM
Gerald's Game was very frightening.

As was Cujo.

tlblack
12-15-2006, 08:34 AM
I've read all of King's books. The Stand still holds my attention more than any of the rest.

Lyra Jean
12-15-2006, 08:46 AM
I love Stephen King too. The Shining was very scary; The Stand was horrific; Pet Semetary frightening; Christine ..... I've run out of adjectives. I'm not a horror fan as such, but he writes in a way that makes it all almost believable. He's great.

I read Christine and wasn't that impressed. It was a good story and I like how he showed the metamorphose of the MC but it just wasn't that scary to me.

Lyra Jean
12-15-2006, 08:48 AM
IT is soooo scary, there are no adjectives to describe it...

I only had a paragraph read to me when I was 12. I'm still afraid to walk by the sewer openings in the sidewalk. I'm 27 now.

alleycat
12-15-2006, 02:08 PM
Haven't read Gerald's Game or The Girl who loved...don't recall.
Both of those have rather simple premises. In The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon a girl is lost in the woods. That's bad enough, but is she being followed, stalked by . . . (I don't want to give away any spoilers). In Gerald's Game a woman is tied to a bed unable to free herself after her husband keels over during one of their sex games. There is no one around who she call yell for help. Then more unpleasant things begin to happen . . . Both are well-written but not King at the top of his form, in my opinion.

I'm currently reading Lisey's Story but I haven't gotten far enough along to say how good it is.

Begbie
12-22-2006, 12:14 AM
I enjoyed Cell earlier this year. I love Bag of Bones, which is a quiet ghost story about a writer. I purchased Lisey's Story, but haven't gotten around to reading it yet.

Southern_girl29
12-22-2006, 01:05 AM
Both of those have rather simple premises. In The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon a girl is lost in the woods. That's bad enough, but is she being followed, stalked by . . . (I don't want to give away any spoilers). In Gerald's Game a woman is tied to a bed unable to free herself after her husband keels over during one of their sex games. There is no one around who she call yell for help. Then more unpleasant things begin to happen . . . Both are well-written but not King at the top of his form, in my opinion.

I'm currently reading Lisey's Story but I haven't gotten far enough along to say how good it is.

I really liked The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, but not so much Gerald's Game. I agree that King wasn't at the top of his form in that one. I'm re-reading Dolores Claiborne right now, which is an awesome story. An awesome voice, too.

Edited to add: Just finished re-reading The Green Mile and found that it is just as good as the other times I've read it. Wonderful book.

alleycat
12-22-2006, 02:29 AM
I really liked The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, but not so much Gerald's Game. I agree that King wasn't at the top of his form in that one. I'm re-reading Dolores Claiborne right now, which is an awesome story. An awesome voice, too.

Edited to add: Just finished re-reading The Green Mile and found that it is just as good as the other times I've read it. Wonderful book.
Delores Claiborne is one of my favorites of King's stories. I happened to be reading On Writing again this week and he talks about both Gerald's Game and Tom Gordon in the section on plotting vs. not plotting.

Since your'e in Tennessee, Southern, did you know the movie version of The Green Mile was filmed at the old Tennessee State Prison? I remember when Tom Hanks and crew were in town for the filming.

TsukiRyoko
12-30-2006, 04:48 PM
I'm head over heels in love with Stephen King. Oddly enough, my favorite story of his is The Langoliers. A lot of people say it's one of his not-so-good stories, but I disagree.

PeeDee
12-30-2006, 07:31 PM
That was in "Four Past Midnight," which contains the original short story for one of my favoritest movies EVER, "Secret Window, Secret Garden."

I liked the Langoliers. I thought it was a strange story, but I thought the characters were interesting enough that you had to keep reading to find out what on earth was going to happen on this airplane...

Cell was a wonderful read. Except for the ending. By which I mean, the last paragraph. Honestly, Steve, all I needed was five more pages. One more page. One more damned paragraph! The ending drove me NUTS.

TsukiRyoko
12-30-2006, 09:11 PM
That was in "Four Past Midnight," which contains the original short story for one of my favoritest movies EVER, "Secret Window, Secret Garden."

I liked the Langoliers. I thought it was a strange story, but I thought the characters were interesting enough that you had to keep reading to find out what on earth was going to happen on this airplane...

Cell was a wonderful read. Except for the ending. By which I mean, the last paragraph. Honestly, Steve, all I needed was five more pages. One more page. One more damned paragraph! The ending drove me NUTS. I got the best offer EVER for Four Past midnight (perhaps, on a subconscious level, thats why The Langoliers is my favorite? because I got a good sale on it?) I was doing my normal library sale stake-out rounds, when my instincts brought me to the super-sale section. And there it was, sitting there with the most beautiful "Only 1.50!" sticked on it. I almost cried. Then, when I went up to the desk, the librarian (a good friend of mine) said "How bout I give you all this for a quarter?". THAT was when I really cried. Such a glorious day.

Chumplet
12-30-2006, 09:50 PM
I read IT many years ago, and the creepiness and darkness of it all turned me off clowns forever.

One story that sticks in my mind is a short story called The Body. His description of the boys' overnight trip transported me. I felt, heard and smelled everything. It was later adapted for the big screen in Stand By Me.

I think that was the one piece that inspired me to write, although I didn't really begin writing until two years ago.

Also, don't forget On Writing.

Foinah
12-30-2006, 10:00 PM
I loved the Stand....epic! The Shining, Pet Semetary, Salem's Lot - all my favs.

I have read most every book he's ever written (save three or four of the Dark Tower stuff - don't care for that series) and am currently looking forward to his latest. Lisey's Story looks interesting.

As a Sox fan, I loved The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon (until he went to the yankees - ha!).

A cluster of his books written before Dream Catchers were written while he was seriously in the throes of alcoholism and pill popping. The book Rose Madder, is a prime example of the meandering he went through. Awful book but still Kingesque.

He's a brilliant writer, an inspiration for the closet writer in us all, and I would give my eye teeth just to be able to walk up and shake his hand.
spooky spooky spooky!

MyFirstMystery
12-31-2006, 12:47 AM
That was in "Four Past Midnight," which contains the original short story for one of my favoritest movies EVER, "Secret Window, Secret Garden."

I liked the Langoliers. I thought it was a strange story, but I thought the characters were interesting enough that you had to keep reading to find out what on earth was going to happen on this airplane...

Cell was a wonderful read. Except for the ending. By which I mean, the last paragraph. Honestly, Steve, all I needed was five more pages. One more page. One more damned paragraph! The ending drove me NUTS.

I agree with you on Cell. A good scary book. Reminded me of the Stand (my favorite) in a few ways. As much as the ending was frustrating, I admit it was probably better than some canned artificial ending.

His short work "The Mist" is also kick*ss.

MFM

Shades of Humanity
12-31-2006, 02:16 AM
I agree with you on Cell. A good scary book. Reminded me of the Stand (my favorite) in a few ways. As much as the ending was frustrating, I admit it was probably better than some canned artificial ending.
MFM

I just finished the Cell the other day - it was a fun read, and like you stated, reminiscent of the Stand.

I have a question - in Cell and The Stand his characters never take vehicles because of the congested traffic pileups somehow makes this impossible. I don't understand, especially on the highways. What's wrong with driving down the shoulder or on the side of the road or 4X4 on the fields next to the roads.

Does he use this as a literary device to lenghten the travels for character development?

PeeDee
12-31-2006, 05:36 AM
They took vehicles in Cell. They took a school bus and a van, I believe. Or maybe jsut the school bus again.

And I agree. The ending ripped my heart out, but I wouldn't change it. I just want to know what happened. Here I am, eyes shining going "What happens next?" And Uncle Steve leans down and says "That's a story for another time. Good night, Pete" and I lie there, imagining all the things that happen next.

I adored Cell, actually.

WriterInChains
12-31-2006, 08:32 AM
I've read every Stephen King book as they came out since 1978 (except for about 2 years when I had a baby/toddler, had to play catch-up then! :)) and he's always been one of my favorites. If I had to pick a favorite book, I couldn't, but I can pick two: The Stand and Drawing Of The Three. I love the whole Gunslinger series (I've always been a sucker for a Spaghetti Western, though), but DOTT was one of those books with a lot of surprises in it. Gotta love it!

Cell was very cool, especially the ending.

I've had many "SK moments", one of my favorites was riding through the Nevada desert while reading The Stand. Uber creepy! :)

Shades: Some of the characters used vehicles in The Stand. Mostly the bad guys -- symbolism, anyone? ;)

Writer2011
12-31-2006, 08:36 AM
I've read just about everything he's written, except for the Dark Tower series...Still have yet to read those. I want to read Lisey's Story too...

My favorite one of his though is MISERY :)

Just hope that he can continue putting out stories...

PeeDee
01-01-2007, 02:07 AM
I was delighted at the adaptations of his stories in Nightmares & Dreamscapes on TNT. Particularly the one starring William H. Macy. And Ron Livingston ("The End of the Whole Mess.") God they were good.

And "The Road Virus Heads North" (which is a magnificant story) was going mostly well, but I thought the ending needed to be about two minutes shorter.

VeggieChick
01-04-2007, 02:27 PM
I absolutely love SK. He's the reason I became a writer. My favorite book of his is "Salem's Lot." Making vampires scary is such a difficult thing and this book REALLY does it.

BlueTexas
01-09-2007, 08:51 AM
I've read just about everything he's written, except for the Dark Tower series...Still have yet to read those.

I love nearly all the King books, but the best by far are the Dark Tower books. I paid hardcover retail for the last couple, and that's a freaking miracle. I haven't read Cell or Lisey's Story yet, but they both showed up for Christmas so will soon.

There's also a short story, called something about the Little Sisters of Eluria? I can't recall the exact name or the collection it's in, but it's related to the Dark Tower series and quite good on its own.

I really quite liked Rose Madder but nearly didn't finish The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon. Maybe it's the baseball thing.

jodiodi
01-18-2007, 11:41 PM
I loved The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon. I also really liked Bag of Bones. To me, BoB was such a touching story, quite romantic actually, while still being creepy. I've read most of his books except the latest ones and the Dark Tower series. I have to say my favorite was The Shining. I am a sucker for a haunted house story--a good haunted house story, and that one is about as good as they come.

jennifer75
01-19-2007, 12:56 AM
I never slept on a plane flight since reading "Langoliers."

I watched the mini-series way back when, shoot 10 yrs ago maybe? That was creepy. I can only imagine reading it.

dyljos
01-19-2007, 04:14 AM
I just finished putting four grand shelves up in my new house's den to accomadate (spelling?!) my books. Stepho took up a whole shelf of course. I just need to figure out why I have only thirty three... where's the eyes of the dragon gone, who's pinched salem's lot and why do I have two Dolores'??

Levi
01-19-2007, 04:18 AM
A number of years ago I read the Stand but got board in the middle so I never finished it -- I never read another King book of fiction since.

However, I just read King's book on writing and found it inspiring, helpful, entertaining and informative -- I highly recommend it.

dyljos
01-19-2007, 04:20 AM
His short work "The Mist" is also kick*ss.

MFM

Wow, totally agree.. I don't know what it is about King, but I feel like I knew the charcters in his books. And 'The Mist' is a book I often recall during day to day activity, and I actually have to remind myself that it was just a book and I never met the people in the supermarket!!:D

jennifer75
01-19-2007, 04:21 AM
I just finished putting four grand shelves up in my new house's den to accomadate (spelling?!) my books. Stepho took up a whole shelf of course. I just need to figure out why I have only thirty three... where's the eyes of the dragon gone, who's pinched salem's lot and why do I have two Dolores'??

If you need to get rid of one of your Dolores Claibornes (spelling??) I'll take it. :)

jennifer75
01-19-2007, 04:22 AM
A number of years ago I read the Stand but got board in the middle so I never finished it -- I never read another King book of fiction since.

However, I just read King's book on writing and found it inspiring, helpful, entertaining and informative -- I highly recommend it.


WOOOOHOOOOOOOO.........I may have mentioned a million times on here, that I just purchased "On Writing" online. And I can't wait to get it!

jodiodi
01-19-2007, 04:53 AM
'On Writing' is a great book. It really inspired me to get back into writing.

Alex Bravo
01-19-2007, 06:05 AM
One of my favorite movies is "The Shawshank Redemption." I was shocked that it was based on his work, "Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption."

I saw in an interview that he met a woman who said she hated his work because it was all horror. He told her he wrote Shawshank; and she told him that he couldn't have written that because she like that one!!!!

PeeDee
01-19-2007, 08:58 AM
I just finished Misery. It blew me away. Absolutely blew me away.

I'm reading Bag of Bones now.

Eyes of the Dragon is next, if only because it's such a wildly different sort of book for him.

Southern_girl29
01-19-2007, 09:38 AM
I just finished Misery. It blew me away. Absolutely blew me away.

I'm reading Bag of Bones now.

Eyes of the Dragon is next, if only because it's such a wildly different sort of book for him.

It's so hard to pick a favorite of his, because I've enjoyed so many. But, Bag of Bones has to be one of the best, if not the best, ghost story I've ever read. It's scary but it's also a beautiful story.

jodiodi
01-19-2007, 05:30 PM
It's so hard to pick a favorite of his, because I've enjoyed so many. But, Bag of Bones has to be one of the best, if not the best, ghost story I've ever read. It's scary but it's also a beautiful story.

My thoughts exactly. My husband adored Bag of Bones too, as well as The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon.

dyljos
01-19-2007, 05:59 PM
eyes of the dragon is amazing!

engmajor2005
01-19-2007, 06:04 PM
The Shining isn't just great horror; it's great literature. But I do have one great big shining complaint: the epilogue is unnecessary and perverts the sense of dread the reader felt all through the book. The calm, soothing image of the headlights in the snow should have been the image I was left with, not the sappy picture of the little kid sitting on the pier by the lake. I really don't understand why King threw that epilogue in. It just didn't work.

So for those of you reading The Shining for the firs time, skip the epilogue. And read it exclusively at night, alone, in a quiet house. It's the only way to experience it.

VeggieChick
01-19-2007, 06:23 PM
It's so hard to pick a favorite of his, because I've enjoyed so many. But, Bag of Bones has to be one of the best, if not the best, ghost story I've ever read. It's scary but it's also a beautiful story.
I LOVED Eyes of the Dragon. It's a great, great story. I read that he wrote it for his daughter, because she complained of not being able to read any of his other books.

BlueTexas
01-20-2007, 01:56 AM
I LOVED Eyes of the Dragon. It's a great, great story. I read that he wrote it for his daughter, because she complained of not being able to read any of his other books.

I third that. I wish he'd pick up the story again and write about what happens to Thomas and Denny when they go off at the end. I haven't picked up that book in 15 years probably, and I bet I could name off all the main chars and plotlines.

Sonarbabe
01-23-2007, 12:07 PM
You know, having grown up in Maine I knew where Stephen King lived. (Not too far from me) Now, what's more frightening than his books were the movies that he approved. Mainly, because I KNEW each location that was depicted. I never slept as a child, let me tell you... Still, I forgive him and to this day am a fan of his work. Some of my favorites are:

Four Past Midnight (The Langoliers was simply brilliant)
The Shining
The Green Mile (Wasn't scary, but was well written)
Christine (Creepy)
Carrie (Just totally wrong)

As for his movies?? Creepshow II will forever haunt me. I didn't sleep for six months after watching that, nor did I sleep for a month after watching Maximum Overdrive.

HorrorWriter
01-23-2007, 06:30 PM
I love Stephen King and his works. Before I started reading him, I was mostly into Edgar Allan Poe. Four Past Midnight was great. It was freaky. Desperation was excellent but it was long, still I loved it! I never could pick a favorite. One of my favorite screenplays by him will always be, Silver Bullet. I wasn't a book, just a movie. I loved it. I assume mostly everyone has seen it. If you haven't, it's a classic in my book.:D

BlueTexas
01-23-2007, 08:42 PM
I love Stephen King and his works. Before I started reading him, I was mostly into Edgar Allan Poe. Four Past Midnight was great. It was freaky. Desperation was excellent but it was long, still I loved it! I never could pick a favorite. One of my favorite screenplays by him will always be, Silver Bullet. I wasn't a book, just a movie. I loved it. I assume mostly everyone has seen it. If you haven't, it's a classic in my book.:D

Wasn't the Silver Bullet based off the novella Cycle of the Werewolf?

Soccer Mom
01-23-2007, 09:38 PM
I loved Cycle of the Werewolf. Twelve chapters. One for each month. It was greatness.

Gonzo
01-24-2007, 06:51 PM
I love The Shining, it's a good horror book and set a standard, it's still one of those books that I can't read alone in the house.

T.Trivett
01-24-2007, 07:06 PM
Mr. King is my all time favorite author. I love to read a good scary book. I started reading him in high school, and have followed his work ever since. I've read everything he's done, as himself & as Richard Bachman. His wife is a great author too. I recall reading a book she did, called Small World. It was great.

T.Trivett
01-24-2007, 07:08 PM
I'm head over heels in love with Stephen King. Oddly enough, my favorite story of his is The Langoliers. A lot of people say it's one of his not-so-good stories, but I disagree.


Thats one of my favorites also. Try reading it on a plane, it's awesome! lol

jodiodi
01-24-2007, 07:15 PM
I love The Shining, it's a good horror book and set a standard, it's still one of those books that I can't read alone in the house.

Truer words were never written.

Pamster
02-09-2007, 01:10 AM
I love his books too, but the one I just read, The Green Mile, WOW that was so well written it's frightening...Not that the story itself was scary in a classical sense but it was so good I could NOT put it down, read it all in a day and a half...I love his stuff. :)

Akuma
02-09-2007, 01:25 AM
I just realized that when Stephen King dies, I'm going to be devastated and heartbroken...

So...


Long live the King!!!

Pamster
02-09-2007, 03:24 AM
I just realized that when Stephen King dies, I'm going to be devastated and heartbroken...

So...


Long live the King!!!


I really have to second this sentiment...

Long live the King!!!

The_Grand_Duchess
02-09-2007, 07:29 AM
Pee Dee: Eyes of the Dragon isn't really that far from his work.

Blue Texas: read The Gunslinger, it will tell you briefly what happened to Thomas. And if it doesn't in that one then it does in one of the other DT books.

I am a huge SK fan. It's sick. People used to always ask me how could I read such horror all the time and I could never get them to understand that it wasn't just horror, there was something more, something underneath. That being said, It scared the hell out of me as did Pet Semetary.

My other fave author died not to long ago. Octavia E Butler and Stephen King were my top two. Now he rules alone. Its a weird feeling becuase they mean so much to you but you've never met them.

beezle
02-09-2007, 07:33 AM
I've only gotten into the whole Stephen King mania in the last six months or so, and I'm already in bad. I started off with an anthology of short stories I found second-hand, then some novellas, then The Gunslinger, and now I'm on IT. I've also just ordered his On Writing.

I'm noticing that a lot of his novels seem to be linked, and that common thread is the world of the Dark Tower. Very cool.

The_Grand_Duchess
02-09-2007, 08:30 PM
I've only gotten into the whole Stephen King mania in the last six months or so, and I'm already in bad. I started off with an anthology of short stories I found second-hand, then some novellas, then The Gunslinger, and now I'm on IT. I've also just ordered his On Writing.

I'm noticing that a lot of his novels seem to be linked, and that common thread is the world of the Dark Tower. Very cool.

Yes they are. And thats the most horrible bit because in order to understand everything you have to read all the books. Now I could all crazy about the Tower right now, but I'm not. The world of the tower is the center.

Stephanie_Gunn
02-12-2007, 04:01 PM
The Stand is on of my all-time favourite books. I'm also a huge fan of the Dark Tower books - I love the way King interweaved them with some of his other books.

KCathy
02-12-2007, 07:39 PM
I've always detested horror and didn't read anything of King's until I worked in a bookstore that gave us one free paperback a week as part of our pay. I got stuck one week at the last minute with no decision made and snatched The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon off an endcap. It disn't sound like horror.

It was my free sample of heroin; from there I was hooked. I started with the not-technically-horror stuff like The Green Mile and eventually just kept going, although I stopped after The Shining, just short of things that I know would never let me sleep again like It.

KCathy
02-12-2007, 07:40 PM
P.S. His wife and "ideal reader," Tabitha, writes excellent fiction in her own right.

KellyG
02-12-2007, 07:42 PM
Salems Lot is the one that scares me to death the old tv series is the freakiest ever when Danny Glick floats up to the window and starts his scratching! This isn't one to watch before bedtime and eating a slab of cheese - nightmares guaranteed

wordsmyth
02-12-2007, 09:44 PM
I grew up in Maine, so the first horror books I read were Salem's Lot and The Shining. I love how Stephen King writes!

My favorite book of his is On Writing. I learned so much from reading it and I was highly entertained while being educated. If you haven't read it yet, I recommend it. You'll laugh and learn.

triceretops
02-12-2007, 10:27 PM
I'm 100 pages away from the end of the Stand (the long version). I wish I had the original cut-down copy, but I've managed to takes bites out of this. It's taken me six months off and on. But I like the man's voice, kind of pulls you in in a friendly, disarming way, before he springs something on you. His characters seem to have a "down homesy" quality that you can identify with. I hope to read more of his stuff.

Tri

KellyG
02-13-2007, 11:10 PM
I liked The Shining book much better than the film as you can imagine the horror much better than they can show it. The maze scene was really creepy and you wouldn't want a husband who types a whole book made up of 'redrum' .

The_Grand_Duchess
02-14-2007, 12:35 AM
I thought his whole book was made up of "all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy". It doesn't matter it was creepy. He went crazy, it wasn't enough that the hotel was just haunted, they had to deal with his crazy butt too.

KellyG
02-15-2007, 09:20 PM
You may be right. I may have got this bit confused with the film where Jack sits at his computer - sorry typewriter - typing 'Redrum' endlessly. If I had to use one of those typewriter things I think I would end up doing the same as they look like murder (redrum)!

jennifer75
02-15-2007, 10:28 PM
I want to buy and read my FIRST stephen king novel. I've seen a few movies (The Shining, Misery, Pet Cemetery, Dolores Claiborne and a few others) but I've never read anything by him.

I just started "On Writing" but want to read something fictional.

What would be, in your opinion, the greatest or your absolute favorite and recommended title of his for me to read first? Throw a few at me, I'll research them and pick one.

Thank you!

KellyG
02-15-2007, 10:32 PM
Hi Jennifer. This is a tricky one. I like the ones that I think are his earliest best. Carrie is his first but I think he was on a learning curve. Salem's Lot is out and out horror and a great story. My personal favourite is IT as it has the perfect mixture of horror, great characters and it takes me back three or four years to when I was a kid. Another great one is The Stand. This one is apocalyptic and a bit scary concerning viruses and the times we live in.

jennifer75
02-15-2007, 10:59 PM
I don't know if I'm ready for horror yet. I know, this may be tough to avoid with Stephen King novels but I'd like something to challenge me and keep me in suspense without causing me to fear the dark. :)

I'll look into the Stand.

jennifer75
02-15-2007, 11:20 PM
Has anybody read "The Dark Half"?

I'd love to get my hands on "Everythings' Eventual" but I refuse to purchase mass market paperbacks.

beezle
02-15-2007, 11:27 PM
Has anybody read "The Dark Half"?

I'd love to get my hands on "Everythings' Eventual" but I refuse to purchase mass market paperbacks.

Why?

The Scip
02-15-2007, 11:30 PM
I am somewhat of a Stephen King fanatic. I love pretty huch anything that he has written. In my opinion his best are It, The Stand and Lisey's Story (his new one) i actually just posted about this on my blog a week or so ago.

I would recommend one of the earlier ones to start off like Carrie, Christine or 'Salems Lot. But they are all good.

jennifer75
02-15-2007, 11:35 PM
Why?

I'd love to get my hands on it because the stories seem interesting.

I hate mass market paperbacks because they are so small. I like trade paperbacks. I also hate hardcovers.

I'm wondering if anybody has read The Dark Half because I'm contemplating reading it myself, and would like opinions on it.

~ I wasn't sure which part you were asking WHY about....so I answered them all.

The Scip
02-15-2007, 11:38 PM
The Dark Half was pretty good. I liked it.

jennifer75
02-15-2007, 11:40 PM
I may start with Needful Things.

The Scip
02-15-2007, 11:41 PM
Needful Things is also, very good, although the you may need to ready christine and Cujo before reading needful things, there is a lot of crossover between those books.

jennifer75
02-16-2007, 12:38 AM
Needful Things is also, very good, although the you may need to ready christine and Cujo before reading needful things, there is a lot of crossover between those books.

As in I would be confused without reading them, or are there character references? I'm so confused. I went to borders express at lunch, and they didnt have it so I'm without for the moment. I did see both Cujo and Carrie however.

jodiodi
02-16-2007, 12:41 AM
Well, Jennifer, if you don't want to be afraid of the dark, don't start with The Shining (a much better book than any movie). It's my all-time favorite, however, since nothing grabs me like a good 'haunted house' story (emphasis on good).

The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon is a great book, imho, and isn't a go-for-your-throat horror story. My husband and I actually recommended it to his kids. Bag of Bones was also a very good story that, while nice and creepy at times, was actually one of the most romantic books I've ever read. I highly recommend that one.

It's funny, I've never seen anyone on here mention Desperation or The Regulators (two completely inter-connected books). I liked the concept of the same basic story told from two compeltely different settings, characters, manner.

Those are the ones that come to mind offhand that I would recommend for a Stephen King 'virgin'.

Enjoy.

nighttimer
02-26-2007, 07:27 AM
When Big Steve is on his game he's very good. The Shining, The Stand, It, Salem's Lot, Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption, and Misery are some of my absolute favorites.

I didn't dig Cujo, Pet Sematary, The Tommyknockers, Dreamcatcher, Insomnia or Cell at all. Cell was the last book of King's I read and besides being a reworking of The Stand the ending was so abrupt and unsatisfying it had me looking to see if I was missing a page or two.

On Writing should be in any aspiring author's collection of essential books on the craft. King may overdo his "everyman author" persona at times, but his humility is refreshing in a medium where egos often run rampant.

I even enjoy his essays in Entertainment Weekly. The one he wrote ripping into Nancy Grace was terrific.

Good King or Bad King, there's no doubting he IS the king. :Hail:

beezle
02-26-2007, 07:29 AM
Just got my copy of On Writing today, and picked up Nightmares and Dreamscapes, too.

Southern_girl29
02-27-2007, 12:46 AM
I would recommend Delores Claiborne for anyone who doesn't want something that is out and out horror. The voice in it is wonderful. Misery is another good one. It's scary and creepy but won't keep you awake at night.

If you like a good ghost story, Bag of Bones is the best. The Green Mile isn't really horror either, and I recommend it to everyone. They are both favorites of mine. My all time favorite, though, is The Stand.

wordsmyth
02-27-2007, 01:17 AM
Has anybody read "The Dark Half"?

I'd love to get my hands on "Everythings' Eventual" but I refuse to purchase mass market paperbacks.

Everything's Eventual is listed on Paperback Swap (http://www.paperbackswap.com), if you're interested. Check it out.

The_Grand_Duchess
02-27-2007, 01:49 AM
I really enjoyed the Regulators and Desperation! I thought they were great, but I didn't think anyone else liked them becuase I never hear anyone talk about them.

Pet Semetary scared the hell out of me. As did IT. I really like Needful Things and didn't think it was nessary to read Cujo or Christine to really get them. If you read his work there are constant refrecnes to other books in his stories. It's all about creating a world :)

underthecity
02-27-2007, 01:52 AM
I said it earlier and I'll say it again: I love The Shining.

But anyway, I enjoyed The Dark Half; it has such a great story. And it has a memorable line in it that still sticks with me today: "When you f*ck with me, you're f*cking with the best!"

Tommyknockers I only read once and didn't like it.

Cujo is good.

Salem's Lot is awesome.

I have to admit, I did not like The Regulators or Desperation.

The Stand is excellent, but I wouldn't make it my first foray into SK books.

Pet Sematary is good, and surprisingly, the movie is almost dead on. (ha!)

allen

arainsb123
04-01-2007, 11:38 PM
I'm depressed because I think I've read all of King's good work, leaving only mediocrities like The Dark Half and Rose Madder. (Both of which I started but never finished -- The Dark Half had terribly stilted characters, and Rose Madder was just plain bilge.) My favorites are probably The Stand, The Shining, Firestarter, and It. And Cujo, and Pet Sematary, and the whole Dark Tower series EXCEPT for the book The Dark Tower. That book was an absolute betrayal; the ending, I've forgiven him for, but the book in general was a meandering through wordiness and languor.

Cell felt watered-down and strained -- Misery! Oh, Misery! Dolores Claiborne ... Christine ... he's written so many fantastic books. The Green Mile is an excellent read, and well-suited to the reader who hasn't encountered King before.

swvaughn
04-02-2007, 02:53 PM
eyes of the dragon is amazing!

Hooray! I agree. Loved this one.

PeeDee
04-02-2007, 06:24 PM
I'm depressed because I think I've read all of King's good work, leaving only mediocrities like The Dark Half and Rose Madder. (Both of which I started but never finished -- The Dark Half had terribly stilted characters, and Rose Madder was just plain bilge.) My favorites are probably The Stand, The Shining, Firestarter, and It. And Cujo, and Pet Sematary, and the whole Dark Tower series EXCEPT for the book The Dark Tower. That book was an absolute betrayal; the ending, I've forgiven him for, but the book in general was a meandering through wordiness and languor.

Cell felt watered-down and strained -- Misery! Oh, Misery! Dolores Claiborne ... Christine ... he's written so many fantastic books. The Green Mile is an excellent read, and well-suited to the reader who hasn't encountered King before.

I'll just go point by point....

- I liked the Dark Half. I didn't think it was brilliant, or his best, but I enjoyed reading it. I thought it was a good story.

- Okay, I didn't like Rose Madder either. But I did like Rose Red, which is unrelated except for the word "Rose."

- Very much enjoyed The Stand. I don't think it was his best work, but it was a damn good book.

- Did Not Like the Shining. I don't know why. Like Desperation, I just didn't get into it.

- Firestarter was another one. It felt like he was explaining Carrie for us, if that makes sense.

- It was a wonderful television mini-series, with Harry Anderson and Tim Curry as Pennywise. The book wasn't bad, but while my wife enjoyed it, I really didn't. I thought it meandered, and the ending bamboozled me. I won't spoil it for anyone here, but I will say Turtle..? in confusion, and leave it at that.

- Cujo and Pet Semetary were examples of Stephen King's sheer ability, in that he took concepts that should have only been short stories, and he made them novels, and very good novels at that.

- Haven't finished Dark Tower yet. I have it on audio book, with the wonderful George Guidall (who also did American Gods) reading it, and I'm just starting Wizard and Glass.

- Cell was hands down my favorite Stephen King book. It was fast and gleeful and menacing. It was like Stephen King standing up and saying "Hey, mudduhfugguh, I'm still here." That said, I wanted one damn paragraph more at the ending. Was that too much to hope for?

- Misery was the only book I've ever read where I stopped reading for a moment realized that I was pushing myself back into the couch away from the book in tension and alarm. My level of tension and revulsion were nearly unbearable. It was an astonishing book.

- Dolores Clairborne, I haven't read. It's next on my Stephen King list. Christine I also haven't read, and for some reason, haven't felt the urge to do so. Probably should.

- The Green Mile was beautiful. (possibly the last good movie Tom Hanks/Ron Howard made...) Stephen King can go from harsh and alarming to gentle in an instant, and that's part of his power.

- May I also add Needful Things to the list? I had trouble getting into it for a hundred pages or so, but once I was in, I couldn't get back out. I enjoyed it. But this is probably because I enjoyed The Dark Half and it features some of the same characters.

- My favorite examples of Steve King's writing, actually, are his short stories. Secret Window, for example, is one of my all-time favorite pieces of writing from anyone (and the movie is never far from the top of my list).

scarletpeaches
04-02-2007, 06:28 PM
Every Stephen King book I've read, I've had to drag myself through...there are a number I've put down in boredom.

At the moment I'm struggling with Lisey's Story. I want to see what everyone else sees in SK, but...

But then, I am a weirdo. I've managed to finish the much-maligned Rose Madder and Dreamcatcher!

VeggieChick
04-02-2007, 10:35 PM
Absolutely loved Salem's Lot. My favorite horror book of all time. Also loved Eyes of the Dragon. Have read pretty much anything King has written except for the series. I'm really not too much into his short stories, but really like the novels.

ChunkyC
04-03-2007, 10:33 PM
I think King is great. I've enjoyed pretty much everything of his I've read.

My fave King books:

Salem's Lot
The Shining
The Stand
The Tommyknockers
Hearts in Atlantis

Not being a horror fan per se, Hearts in Atlantis is the one I liked the most. The one that freaked me out the most had to be Salem's Lot.

I haven't finished the Dark Tower series yet, so I'm holding off judgement on that.

jennifer75
04-04-2007, 03:06 AM
I was watching War of the Worlds last night and (I know, not a King flick) but it got to the part at the Ferry Boat and the "things" coming over the hill to attack and I freaked out. I had flashbacks of Langoliers and turned off the video. I cant stand that kind of horror! It totally freaked me out! It didnt help that I was alone.....lol.

Writer2011
04-04-2007, 03:18 AM
My favorite of his is MISERY :)

Kay_XX
04-09-2007, 02:32 PM
I love Stephen King. Not in a I'm-going-to-stalk-him -kinda way, but in a he's-given-me-so-much-I-love-him-for-it -kinda way.

Granted, not all his novels are masterpieces but he is a great storyteller. There are few writers who can capture the feel of bonding and friendship better than him (the children in IT, Stand by Me, The Dark Tower -series for example).

The latest I've read from him is The Cell (Lisey's Story isn't published here yet) and the man still has it.

If I'm forced to pick a favourite, it's the whole Dark Tower series. I love each and every main character, from Roland to Oy. The talent King has, IMO, is that he creates amazing characters. Yes, he's good at storytelling and his plots are great. But it's the characters that stick to my mind and stay with me.

Death Wizard
04-15-2007, 07:01 AM
In my humble opinion, Pet Semetary is the scariest book ever written. Salem's Lot and The Shining were fantastic. The Dark Tower series was bizarre and quirky, but a great, great read. Cell surprised me; the first 50 pages, especially, are fantastic. I loved The Stand, but not as much as some people.

Saundra Julian
04-15-2007, 07:17 AM
I love, love, love King, BUT I cannot get through Lisey's Story...it's so boring and I'm very disappointed!

sgtmrb03
04-28-2007, 09:27 AM
I agree with DeathWizard. I don't scare easily, but Pet Semetary freaked me the f*$k out. The Stand is an epic. Love it. I'm not crazy about his recent stuff. Cell was a good story, but the writing lacked. Different Seasons was his best work overall, IMHO. I love The Breathing Method. And I agree with what a few other posters have said. His work hasn't been done due justice by Hollywood. The majority of the film adaptations have sucked, save The Green Mile, The Shining, [I] and Misery.

kristie911
04-29-2007, 12:08 AM
I just started Lisey's Story and I've only managed to get to page 15 or so. It's bloody awful so far...the character isn't even interesting enough for me to give a crap what's happening to her. I think her husband died of frickin' boredom!

ACK! I want so badly to like it...I love everything else SK has written. Cell is my favorite of his recent works. But The Stand, IMO, is his best work ever. I've read it at least 15 times...

Blushing Apple
05-13-2007, 05:48 AM
I love his work. Firestarter is the only one I have read twice. Loved it. Finished Cell and thought it was the goriest thing he's done.. and loved it. :)

I read The Stand when I was 15 and I had just gotten into Led Zeppelin. While I was reading it, I was listening to Led Zeppelin 4 and the song "Stairway to Heaven" seemed to fit everything going on in the book!

ILove2Write
05-30-2007, 12:24 AM
I love Stephen King's work. I recently picked up his book On Writing (I know it's not new) and read it. I found the grammar parts very helpful. However, when I picked up his book The Shining, I found that some things he wrote contradicted what he was teaching.

Is this because the books are older and the way writing style is now has changed?

I'm not trying to argue with him here...but then when I look at other people's books I see they do the same thing that he previously did.

i.e. dialogue..just thinking randomly here.

"I'll get it," she groaned.
Stephen King says it should be:
"I'll get it," she said.

But in his books, I've seen him write like the first sentence.

I still love his work, either way though. Any answers to how it should be written?

Jordygirl
05-30-2007, 12:44 AM
Anyone read The Long Walk? What did you think of it?
(I haven't read it yet, so no spoilers!)

Cindyh2k
05-30-2007, 12:46 AM
I LOVE Stephen King! Absolutely, no doubt about it, my favorite writer!

alaskamatt17
05-30-2007, 01:30 AM
My favorite King book is the first collaboration he did with Peter Straub, The Talisman. One of the best fantasy adventures I've ever read.

BlueBadger
05-30-2007, 02:16 AM
"Eyes of the Dragon" remains my favourite fantasy book of all time. It seems like fantasy writers work their bums off to give readers magical surroundings, but King worked effortlessly with his characters instead. There was certainly magic involved, but there was also a gritty atmosphere that other fantasy authors spit-shine out of their novels. I don't mind subtle reminders about how people without access to running water and basic health care probably had regular fights with bad stomachs, bad teeth and dangerous child birth.

I recently finished "The Shining" and it was great. Also liked The Stand, The Mist (in Skeleton Crew), Pet Semetary and 'Salem's Lot. I also liked It, but I got a titch lost by the end. XD

ACK! I want so badly to like it...I love everything else SK has written. Cell is my favorite of his recent works. But The Stand, IMO, is his best work ever. I've read it at least 15 times...

Don't feel too badly. My mom used to be the world's biggest King fan, but she absolutely can't stand his newer stuff. She almost never buys it anymore, whereas she used to always be first in line for his hardcovers.

ChunkyC
05-30-2007, 03:31 AM
I really like King too. I'm almost halfway through The Dark Tower VII, last one in the series. I'm so excited to see how it ends.
I love Stephen King's work. I recently picked up his book On Writing (I know it's not new) and read it. I found the grammar parts very helpful. However, when I picked up his book The Shining, I found that some things he wrote contradicted what he was teaching.

Is this because the books are older and the way writing style is now has changed?

I'm not trying to argue with him here...but then when I look at other people's books I see they do the same thing that he previously did.

i.e. dialogue..just thinking randomly here.

"I'll get it," she groaned.
Stephen King says it should be:
"I'll get it," she said.

But in his books, I've seen him write like the first sentence.

I still love his work, either way though. Any answers to how it should be written?
No rule is written in stone. The occasional "she groaned" is fine. But for a new writer, it's important to learn that it's very easy to overdo dialogue tags.

Their primary and by far most important purpose is to aid the reader in identifying the speaker. So when starting out, stick to the basics and before long you'll just know when it's okay to deviate from "the rules," he expounded. ;)

Death Wizard
05-30-2007, 03:40 AM
I agree with DeathWizard. I don't scare easily, but Pet Semetary freaked me the f*$k out. The Stand is an epic. Love it. I'm not crazy about his recent stuff. Cell was a good story, but the writing lacked. Different Seasons was his best work overall, IMHO. I love The Breathing Method. And I agree with what a few other posters have said. His work hasn't been done due justice by Hollywood. The majority of the film adaptations have sucked, save The Green Mile, The Shining, and [I]Misery.

My eldest child was 2 years old when I read Pet Semetary, so that certainly played a role in it terrifying me, IF you know what I mean.

BlueBadger
05-30-2007, 03:55 AM
For some reason, the hedge animals moving for the first time in "The Shining" freaked me out.

Bo Sullivan
05-30-2007, 04:00 AM
I agree with DeathWizard. I don't scare easily, but Pet Semetary freaked me the f*$k out. The Stand is an epic. Love it. I'm not crazy about his recent stuff. Cell was a good story, but the writing lacked. Different Seasons was his best work overall, IMHO. I love The Breathing Method. And I agree with what a few other posters have said. His work hasn't been done due justice by Hollywood. The majority of the film adaptations have sucked, save The Green Mile, The Shining, and [I]Misery.

What about Shawshank Redemption? That was an excellent film. I have seen it three times now.

Barbara

Death Wizard
05-30-2007, 04:03 AM
What about Shawshank Redemption? That was an excellent film. I have seen it three times now.

Barbara

Probably the best movie made from King's work. The movie was better than the novella, in my opinion, though both were excellent.

Bo Sullivan
05-30-2007, 04:07 AM
Probably the best movie made from King's work. The movie was better than the novella, in my opinion, though both were excellent.

I thought everything in the Novella was captured in the film and it was superbly translated to that medium. I was so disappointed that the Novella was not a full length book.

Barbara

Death Wizard
05-30-2007, 04:14 AM
I thought everything in the Novella was captured in the film and it was superbly translated to that medium. I was so disappointed that the Novella was not a full length book.

Barbara

You're right, it easily could have been expanded.

The ending of the movie makes me cry every time.

triceretops
05-30-2007, 05:08 AM
About the Long Walk...absolutely incredible, a nail-biter as far as I'm concerned.

Tri

Alvah
05-30-2007, 06:33 AM
He is a first rate story teller. I especially liked Hearts in Atlantis, Bag of Bones, and The Stand. One of his short stories "Everything You Love Will be Carried Away" is one of the best I've read by any author.

I like most of his work, but once in a while he writes a clunker. For example Cell was derivative of The Stand, and its ending was weak.

CACTUSWENDY
06-20-2007, 01:19 AM
I set a new record today. Purchased a copy of king's 'Lisey's Story'.
Made it to page 46. I must be getting old or something. I can not believe he wrote this. What did the rest of you think of it?.....
Is it possible to give a minus stars?..........If so, I think I could give him at least a -* * *

Del
06-20-2007, 01:31 AM
I heard Lisey's Story on audio book. I suppose over all it was ok. There were some entertaining moments. It does start slow. King likes to stretch things out.

I don't know. I finished The Shining not long ago and felt all but a hundred pages was wasted effort. It should have been a short story. But others loved it. I think King has probably written something for everyone, he has written so much and in so many different ways, but no one can write a story that is unanimously accepted.

You bought it, might as well read it. It will pick up.

reenkam
06-20-2007, 01:35 AM
Okay, after reading all these posts I feel like I'm missing something huge.

Read half of "It"...and got bored.
Read Carrie...thought it was annoying.
Read Firestarter...was forced to for school
Dreamcatcher twice...both times I thought it'd make a good pillow.
Eyes of the Dragon I read in 6th grade so I don't remember it, much
Dark Tower 1&2 were okay, I've never finished 3....
Tom Gordon....okay, that one I thought was amazing.

What am I missing here? Maybe I'm reading the wrong ones but I just keep getting bored and not frightened at all. What should I try reading of King's to...I don't know. Appreciate why he's so amazing?

III
06-20-2007, 01:41 AM
Okay, after reading all these posts I feel like I'm missing something huge.

Read half of "It"...and got bored.
Read Carrie...thought it was annoying.
Read Firestarter...was forced to for school
Dreamcatcher twice...both times I thought it'd make a good pillow.
Eyes of the Dragon I read in 6th grade so I don't remember it, much
Dark Tower 1&2 were okay, I've never finished 3....
Tom Gordon....okay, that one I thought was amazing.

What am I missing here? Maybe I'm reading the wrong ones but I just keep getting bored and not frightened at all. What should I try reading of King's to...I don't know. Appreciate why he's so amazing?

I'd say you're reading the wrong ones. But if boredom is a problem, I'd recommend getting one of his books of short stories. If you wanna be scared, get Nightmares & Dreamscapes. I love pretty much all of his short-story books and about 2/3 of his full-length novels, although I haven't read any of his new ones for the past few years.

Del
06-20-2007, 01:55 AM
Amazing Kings:

The Stand
Cujo
Bag of Bones

I'm starting on the Green Mile. The movie was amazing, I hope the book is too.

CatSlave
06-20-2007, 02:38 AM
My eldest child was 2 years old when I read Pet Semetary, so that certainly played a role in it terrifying me, IF you know what I mean.
I loved the last line in Pet Semetary: "Darling," it said.
That still gives me nightmares.

ChunkyC
06-27-2007, 02:17 AM
Salem's Lot. His second novel, and one of his best, imho. Creeped me right out.

Cassiopeia
06-27-2007, 04:25 AM
I have read two of his novel; Misery and The Green Mile. I also have his book on writing.

I must say, I thought to myself while reading Misery that the man can't form a proper sentence to save his life but then I absolutely loved The Green Mile.

Clearly he can weave a tale, irrespective of what I might think of his sentence structures. :D

swvaughn
06-27-2007, 07:11 AM
Stephen King, IMHO, writes spectacular novellas.

Reenkam, you might try Different Seasons or Four Past Midnight. Both are collections of four novellas (three of the four in Different Seasons have had movies based on them). I think Apt Pupil (the novella, not the movie) and The Breathing Method are my favorite King works -- both are in Different Seasons.

tammieofmi
06-30-2007, 07:41 PM
I set a new record today. Purchased a copy of king's 'Lisey's Story'.
Made it to page 46. I must be getting old or something. I can not believe he wrote this. What did the rest of you think of it?.....
Is it possible to give a minus stars?..........If so, I think I could give him at least a -* * *
I couldn't agree more! I am a huge King fan but I can't even get thru the first few pages of Lisey's Story. I've tried 3 different times to pick it back up after going off and reading something else. So disappointed.

Loved the book IT, couldn't put it down. Also loved Bag of Bones, thought it was more emotional than most of his stuff.

Tammie

ILove2Write
09-25-2007, 10:06 PM
Between The Shining and Pet Semetary, which one should I read first?

Sunnyside
09-26-2007, 05:36 PM
Very different books, with very different scares. But I give the edge to The Shining.

TsukiRyoko
09-27-2007, 03:15 AM
I LOVE King's stories, but I must admit that I'm not too partial to his style. He's the only man who gives me a headache after one page. I usually skim past the first chapter or so, only reading through what I feel is absolutely necessary to the plot, because his introductions are sooooooooo drawnnnnnnnn outtttttt that I can't stand it. Once the shit hits the fan and the plot picks up, it's almost guaranteed that I'll love his stories, but those firts few chapters are painful in my opinion.

I never thought I'd say this, but....

I think I'll stick to the movies for most of King's stuff. No, don't hit me!

TsukiRyoko
09-27-2007, 03:16 AM
Stephen King, IMHO, writes spectacular novellas.

Reenkam, you might try Different Seasons or Four Past Midnight. Both are collections of four novellas (three of the four in Different Seasons have had movies based on them). I think Apt Pupil (the novella, not the movie) and The Breathing Method are my favorite King works -- both are in Different Seasons.
I agree, Four Past Midnight was an admirable collection of novellas. I found the whole book for one dollar at a library sale, and nearly peed myself. IT was the best dollar I ever spent.

gingerwoman
10-08-2007, 06:16 AM
Dreamcatcher twice...both times I thought it'd make a good pillow. um... so why did you read it twice.
I'm fascinated by his imagination but don't like things to be too gory. lol
I loved Insomnia although the begining more than the rest of it.
Misery was much more scary than I thought it would be. It's actually quite brilliant and I read it at the same time as I read On Writing. There is a whole intellectual rumination on a writer's place in the world underneath the horror story.
The only other one I have read is Carrie.
If anyone wants to recommend any of his books that are brilliant but less gross and gory than the others do so.
Yeah I know I'm :crazy:

seun
10-08-2007, 02:54 PM
If anyone wants to recommend any of his books that are brilliant but less gross and gory than the others do so.


The Shining
Eyes of the Dragon
Dark Tower books
Christine
Tommyknockers

jennifer75
10-09-2007, 01:12 AM
I'm reading "On Writing", is it supposed to be funny cause I'm 23 pages in and I've stopped to laugh out loud a number of times.

I love his writing, has he written anything with humor and less fright?

gingerwoman
10-09-2007, 01:29 AM
Thanks guys!
Yes Jen it's supposed to be funny, in the places where it's funny.

seun
10-09-2007, 12:49 PM
I'm reading "On Writing", is it supposed to be funny cause I'm 23 pages in and I've stopped to laugh out loud a number of times.

I love his writing, has he written anything with humor and less fright?

The Body has some funny moments. And although not related to talking about King, you might want to check out Creed by James Herbert. Dark comedy rather than black comedy.

Voyager
10-09-2007, 01:01 PM
I've read everything King ever wrote, some of it I loved and have reread, others not so much. A lot of his stuff scared the beejeezuss out of me, especially Salem's lot, but for some reason, The Jaunt scared and horrified me, and stayed with me a long time after I'd read it. I read it years ago. It would be interesting to see if it still has the same effect.

gingerwoman
10-10-2007, 12:28 PM
Who liked Insomnia?

seun
10-10-2007, 12:40 PM
Who liked Insomnia?

Me :hi:

I loved the idea of an old guy being the one to save the day. King doesn't think much of the book, but I thought it was great.

gingerwoman
10-10-2007, 02:09 PM
I loved the begining with the "Random" and all that. F*** ing brilliant! But he thinks it was a bad book.
I must say I remember the rest wasn't as good as the begining but I did finish and enjoy it.

VeggieChick
10-16-2007, 10:01 PM
Salem's Lot. His second novel, and one of his best, imho. Creeped me right out.

My favorite King book. Pretty creepy --Gave me nightmares for days.

OctoberRain
10-20-2007, 10:25 AM
The first adult novel I ever read was my mother's copy of Pet Sematary when I was 10. What a shocking difference from Sweet Valley High! I didn't know books could be like that. I picked it up because it had the cool scary cat on the cover (little did I know).

Then I read It, again one of my mother's books. I don't think I understood all of it back then, and I've probably read it about seven times since - it's probably one of my favourite books of all time. Because of the way it made me feel. The way he writes children... amazing. Each of those seven kids was like someone I knew personally. And I was about their age when I read the book the first time. I get something different out of it each time I read it.

And I am a fan of Insomnia. Ralph was the coolest elderly person ever.

I think I'm probably the only person who didn't enjoy The Stand. My mind wandered both times I tried to get through it. :(

zahra
10-21-2007, 05:14 AM
I really enjoyed the Regulators and Desperation! I thought they were great, but I didn't think anyone else liked them becuase I never hear anyone talk about them.



I really liked both of them! 'The Regulators' is my fave out of the two. I read them after a King-less gap of a few years, and I'm so glad I did.

I just realized that when Stephen King dies, I'm going to be devastated and heartbroken...

Nah, just dig him up! He'll understand!

Loved most of Stevie-babes's works (he likes me to call him Stevie-babes - or he would, if we met), especially Salem's Lot (recently replaced my copy after I read it to tatters), Cujo, The Mist, The Shining, Pet Sematary and The Regulators, but Insomnia annoyed me and Cell was a re-hash of old ideas and a very limp one, at that.

I haven't read any of the Dark Tower stuff as it's not my thing. Haven't got round to Tom Gordon either.

The_Grand_Duchess
10-21-2007, 07:12 AM
I've read everything King ever wrote, some of it I loved and have reread, others not so much. A lot of his stuff scared the beejeezuss out of me, especially Salem's lot, but for some reason, The Jaunt scared and horrified me, and stayed with me a long time after I'd read it. I read it years ago. It would be interesting to see if it still has the same effect.

"It's eternity in there".

Me too.

edgyllama
10-21-2007, 06:40 PM
'Salem's Lot creeped me out too...I still shiver thinking about it twenty odd years on.

red lantern
10-22-2007, 07:18 AM
I liked the Dark Tower Series and The Stand. I did not find them to be scary or creepy but great page turners.

gingerwoman
10-22-2007, 09:10 AM
Nah, just dig him up! He'll understand!:roll:

seun
11-05-2007, 04:12 PM
And I am a fan of Insomnia. Ralph was the coolest elderly person ever.


Agreed. Ralph rocked. I loved the old farts being the ones to save the day. King did a similar thing in a short story called One For The Road.

zahra
11-06-2007, 11:37 PM
Agreed. Ralph rocked. I loved the old farts being the ones to save the day. King did a similar thing in a short story called One For The Road.

Ooh, yeah, the vampire one. I love that story. And old farts in 'Grey Matter' saved the day, too...or maybe not.

I loved 'One for the Road' partly because I really like it when he tells us something about old characters and stories, in subsequent tales. I so want to know what happened to the little girl in 'Pet Sematary' when she grew up. I want her to go back and find that there's a town full of secret zombies or something. Or maybe she loses someone and gets tempted.

I want to know what the mother does in 'Gramma', when she comes home and finds...what?

I know I'm greedy, but I can't help it. I want more.

seun
11-07-2007, 03:03 PM
With One For The Road, I love the way the narrator and his friend treat the vampires a few miles away as something that just has to be accepted. It's frightening but they can't just ignore it. It's a nice, understated bravery that contrasts with how they leg it when the little girl comes for her father in the blizzard.

Toni1953
11-07-2007, 03:06 PM
My favorites are Salem's Lot, The Shining, Pet Sematary and Needful Things. I like the earlier King works.

Carrie? Not a big fan of it. If that had been my first King book i doubt i would have been hooked. the first one i read was Salem's Lot.

Righting
11-12-2007, 08:12 AM
my fav- the cell. i just finished lisey's story- it was also good. Also started the shining- that reminds me- i have to get back to that. another fav is the nightmare and dreamscapes collection.

Sean D. Schaffer
11-17-2007, 01:02 AM
The only King book I've ever read was On Writing. His portrayal of himself as a regular guy who likes to write has helped to change a lot of my attitudes about the Craft, as well as the people who work within it. I feel like there's hope for me now, where my writing is concerned, whereas beforehand I did not.

I've seen movies based on other books he did, but On Writing was the only book he wrote, that I've ever read.

Gollum
11-18-2007, 11:26 PM
Hey, King's fans. I just finished "The Shinning", and being the first King book I read and having seen the fantastic Kubrick movie before, I had no idea whether I would enjoy it, but I ended up loving it.

As a movie buff I understand most movies as having no value relation with the books. Great movies have come out from not-so-great books and great book have been the source of below average movies. In "The shinning", both mediums are both perfectly used for the story, but even tough it is the same story, the focus varies in the movie from the book and that makes all the difference.

I was more curious with the first half of the book where the alcoholism presents itself as the primary source of terror as this is the part missing in the movie, but I also found the second half to be great because of it's a lot scarier than the first. Absolutely amazing how King places two characters in the same situation and makes both occurrences equally terrifying(room 217).

Any recomendations on what would be is best work? I've read good things about "The Stand" and the dark tower series.

seun
11-19-2007, 05:03 PM
Any recomendations on what would be is best work? I've read good things about "The Stand" and the dark tower series.

The Stand and the Dark Tower series are both great although it might be worth reading other stuff before DT. In case you don't know, the DT books are linked in various ways to a lot of his other work. You may get more out of them if you've read some of his other books.

Zipotes
03-26-2009, 05:25 PM
I've never read any of his books - I'm a big chicken and don't want to be up all night hiding under the blankets.
But, I'm curious...
Can you recommend one of his best works that is not too gross/scary. Then I can judge if I'll read more.

Thanks!

Kathleen42
03-26-2009, 05:47 PM
I went through my Stephen King phase in the seventh grade. I don't think they're really that scary (with the possible exception of It and Pet Semetary). My favourite was The Stand but you might want to check out The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon.

James81
03-26-2009, 05:57 PM
I've never read his scary stuff, either. Most of his stuff really isn't all that bad.

My #1 recommendation (and my absolute favorite book by King):

Hearts in Atlantis

Awesome book.

Other good stuff:

The Dark Tower Series
Shawshank Redemption (yeah it's a book)
The Running Man

stephenf
03-26-2009, 06:06 PM
Stephen King is a prolific writer and it's difficult to suggest just one book.However,I would suggest two nonfiction books,Danse Macabre and On Writing ,both are interesting to anyone who has a interest in writing and would like to know a bit more about S King and his work.As for one fiction recommendation I would chose, Misery .

alleycat
03-26-2009, 06:08 PM
The Body (the moive Stand By Me was based on it)

Shawshank Redemption

The Green Mile

Hearts in Atlantis

Or maybe his nonfiction book, On Writing.

Jersey Chick
03-26-2009, 06:09 PM
I've only read three King books - IT - which is scary as anything, The Shining - scary but not too scary or gross. And Misery - which I didn't like.

My brother's a huge King fan and he always recommends The Stand and Needful Things, but I can't vouch for how scary or icky either book might be. :)

General Joy
03-26-2009, 06:32 PM
I agree with those who have said The Green Mile and Hearts in Atlantis, since those are not horror. Or if you want to try something shorter, The Body. I loved Dreamcatcher and The Long Walk... wouldn't say either of them are too scary. The latter is especially impressive to me, because imagine writing a book in which the characters are walking the entire time. You'd think the same setting and same actions would get redundant, but it doesn't. King pulls it off very well.

LaurieD
03-26-2009, 06:38 PM
My suggestion? Visit a library or bookstore - read the flyleaf and a couple pages chosen at random from whatever titles grab your attention, then decide which ones you want to read.

Most of his (fiction) books have a little bit of everything in them, though by far, I found IT to be truly scary. The earilier his work, the slightly more (insert adj here - tweaked/twisted/odd/scary/bizarre/peculiar) the story to be. The longer the story, the more times I've had to read it to feel like I'm not missing anything important.

Prozyan
03-26-2009, 06:46 PM
A great SK title that isn't horror or scary at all: The Long Walk.

Really, anything he wrote as Bachman fits that description.

Satori1977
03-26-2009, 08:52 PM
The Body (the moive Stand By Me was based on it)

Shawshank Redemption

The Green Mile

Hearts in Atlantis

Or maybe his nonfiction book, On Writing.

What I was going to say (except for Hearts, never read it). Those are his best works, and not really scary.

ChaosTitan
03-26-2009, 08:55 PM
Thirding (fourthing?) The Green Mile and Hearts in Atlantis.

Different Seasons - read the entire anthology in which "The Body" and "Shawshank" are included. The other two stories are very good, as well.

Also, The Eyes of the Dragon.

Grrarrgh
03-26-2009, 09:02 PM
It is my favorite of his fiction books. And definitely read On Writing.

darkprincealain
03-26-2009, 09:40 PM
Fifthing? Hearts in Atlantis. Also for a later story that isn't scary but is pretty darn odd/bizarre, try From a Buick 8. Fair warning: it did get a fair bit of criticism that it was just a rehash of Christine, but I enjoyed it.

Satori1977
03-26-2009, 09:41 PM
Thirding (fourthing?) The Green Mile and Hearts in Atlantis.

Different Seasons - read the entire anthology in which "The Body" and "Shawshank" are included. The other two stories are very good, as well.

Also, The Eyes of the Dragon.

I forgot he wrote The Eyes of the Dragon. Very different from his usual stuff, I loved that book.

fullbookjacket
03-27-2009, 04:23 AM
The Stand is quite good and not overly scary.

Dommo
03-27-2009, 06:43 AM
I'd also give a thumbs up to the stand. The only problem with the book is that it's a monster, so be ready to spend a lot of time chugging through it.

Cranky
03-27-2009, 07:19 AM
My ditto on the following:

The Stand
The Dark Tower series
The Green Mile
The Eyes of the Dragon

dgrintalis
03-27-2009, 07:39 AM
I am just repeating what a lot of others have said, but here goes anyway!

The Shawshank Redemption
The Long Walk
The Dark Tower books
The Green Mile
The Stand

Delhomeboy
03-27-2009, 07:58 AM
The thing you have to judge with some of these is whether or not you can be "creeped out" or not. Like The Stand for instance: not "scary" in the classical way, but despite my love for it, I've only read it once because the thought of it creeps me out.

That being said, in addition to what others have mentioned, The Dead Zone is another of his that's less horror.

childeroland
03-28-2009, 09:08 AM
Eyes of the Dragon
The Dark Tower Books (though they go downhill after Book 4)
The Stand, cut or original
The Body (probably the best thing he's written)
Danse Macabre (marvelous tour of horror fiction and cinematic classics)
Rage, The Long Walk, and The Running Man -- he really is very good as Bachman

Mr. Pocket Keeper
03-29-2009, 10:28 PM
My two favorite King books are The Stand and IT, but I found IT to be far scarier.

Although the premise of The Stand may be scary, the book itself isn't...at least not a hide under the blankets, sleep with the lights on kind of scary.

EFCollins
03-29-2009, 11:03 PM
If you want King at his best, but not overly scary, try his new anthology of short works, Just After Sunset. There is one very frightening story in there called "N." but the others aren't scary at all. Good stuff, though. Willa and The Gingerbread Girl are my favorite of that one.

Novels, The Green Mile and Hearts in Atlantis, yes, good books. Insomnia wasn't scary at all, and though most talk smack, I loved it. It has a very subtle sense of melancholy throughout too that just... makes it work. Lisey's Story, while strange, is a good one too. Rose Madder... you can see he was still very into Roland and the whole DT thing (not a fan of those, though I wish I could just read them... can't get past page four on the first one) but it's not bad... not great, but not scary either.

Delhomeboy
03-30-2009, 07:27 AM
Rose Madder... you can see he was still very into Roland and the whole DT thing (not a fan of those, though I wish I could just read them... can't get past page four on the first one) but it's not bad... not great, but not scary either.

You must overcome this! ;) I agree, though, the first one is definitely the weakest. I, however, managed to plow through the first twenty or so pages, and that's when things really pick up. Like mondo-rocket-shooting-to-the-planet-Saturn pick up. Not in action, necessarily, but in characterization, comprehension, story, etc. And it doesn't slow down!...then you read the end part of book 4, and after that, it's pretty much hit and miss...:sigh:....

Satori1977
03-30-2009, 08:12 AM
I still want to read the Dark Tower series. A coworker was telling me about it, and it sounds interesting. Especially how he puts characters from other books in it (i am kinda curious how that works). I will get to it one day.

Loved It, but it is one of his scariest, IMO. Very very good book though

Enna
04-01-2009, 07:09 PM
Wait...no one's mentioned Dolores Claiborne!!!

I read it when I was fourteen- that was actually the first of many, many King books for me. Not too scary...actually, it made me angry (in a good way). The MC is a woman that everyone believes is a murderer who was never convicted, and the story of what actually happened unfolds through a series of flashbacks. (I think that's right...this was fifteen years ago, feel free to correct me!)

The darkness for me came from the fact that by the end, I was hoping she was a murderer. (I think I actually remember yelling "oh, just kill the bastard!" by the end.)

I did a book report on it. :)

busy91
04-06-2009, 06:37 PM
The Long Walk was one of my favorite SK stories. I really enjoyed The Green Mile.
On Writing is one of my favorite SK books, lots of food for thought.

beezle
04-06-2009, 06:51 PM
I still want to read the Dark Tower series. A coworker was telling me about it, and it sounds interesting. Especially how he puts characters from other books in it (i am kinda curious how that works). I will get to it one day.

Loved It, but it is one of his scariest, IMO. Very very good book though

I'm in the middle of The Waste Lands (third book), and it's very, very good.

Shail
04-06-2009, 06:59 PM
I agree with most of the suggestions. Yeah, It is probably too creepy for starters, but it was one of my favorites. As for The Stand . . . Warning warning warning. Do not read if you have a head cold. I read it during a bout of acute sinusitus. Had nightmares. Besides, it's really long and not one of my favorite stories. I read it for posterity.

And avoid Dreamcatcher. Not overly scary, but super icky.

Cranky
04-06-2009, 06:59 PM
I'm in the middle of The Waste Lands (third book), and it's very, very good.

It was a great book. But the one that comes after, Wizard and Glass? I think that's the best one in the series, with The Gunslinger following close behind.

Waiting so long for it was agonizing, though. :)

beezle
04-06-2009, 07:01 PM
You know, I got into King via his short story collections. He has some great ones, too. Maybe that's the way to start.

mister_lister
04-07-2009, 01:26 AM
I have read every novel and short story collection that king has produced EXCEPT for his book Rage which he took off the market after a kid used it as an inspiration for a school shooting.

I concur with most recommendations. King has gone through phases with his writing and although he is known for Horror, his strongest books are not very horror in the classic sense. He spins the horror stories out of things of life. For instance, The Shinning was more about alcoholism than ghosts. Pet Semetary is about lossing a child. Doleres Clairbourn is about child molestation and what it does to a family. The Green Mile is about capital punishment. Misery is about obsessive fans. Many of his books take something that happens in the real world and spins them into a horror or some other genre.

Somethings that King does real well:

He portrays interactions between kids that are believable and I find myself many times thinking, "God, he really remembers what it was like to be with your friends as a kid". (IT, Stand By Me).
His senior citizen characters and their interactions are highly developed. (Insomnia and others)
When there are groups of characters all working toward some goal, he handles the interactions in interesting ways. (The Stand, Cell, The Dark Tower Series).This post is gettin long I could talk about his work for a long time. One note, After Sunset his recent short story collection was pretty good, kind of a return to the King style writing that he had in his prime. Not every book hits it out of the park, but he is an enjoyable read for most people.

busy91
04-07-2009, 02:10 AM
Mister Lister, if you really want to read Rage you can find it in:

The Bachman Books : Four Early Novels by Richard Bachman (Rage / The Long Walk / Roadwork / The Running Man).

I found a copy in my local library.

ElsaM
04-07-2009, 04:00 AM
I'd definitely recommend Different Seasons. I really enjoyed all of the stories in it except for Apt Pupil - and that one would be the closest to scary/icky out of the four. The Body and Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption are fantastic.

Cranky
04-07-2009, 04:06 AM
King's short fiction really is pretty extraordinary, if ya ask me. And certainly a more comfortable introduction to his work than some of his novels if you're not "into" horror.

Delhomeboy
04-07-2009, 04:20 AM
King's short fiction really is pretty extraordinary, if ya ask me. And certainly a more comfortable introduction to his work than some of his novels if you're not "into" horror.

Have you read "Just After Sunset"? Greatness, seriously.

Cranky
04-07-2009, 04:23 AM
Not yet, but it's on my wish list. *nudges husband* :D

Delhomeboy
04-07-2009, 04:30 AM
Not yet, but it's on my wish list. *nudges husband* :D

Ha! Tell him to get on it. But for real, it's got some pretty heavy stuff. Except for "N", which will just scare the bejesus out of you.

Cranky
04-07-2009, 04:32 AM
*joneses*

:D

sunday morning
04-07-2009, 06:31 AM
I'll second the once (only once?) mentioned Delores Claiborne. I think that's one of his very best, and it's not horror.

Not mentioned yet: Bag of Bones.

This was my favorite book for a long time after I read it. Some of the realest characters I've ever read. I didn't find it scary, really. It's more a love story than anything. But there's ghosts too & all sorts of puzzle pieces of plot. Great book.

Meredith
04-07-2009, 07:47 AM
I'll second (third, fourth, fifth?) From a Buick 8. I would describe it as tense and thoroughly creepy, rather than downright scary. And as someone else mentioned, it's a "horror" novel that's about a lot more than horror - it's about loss and anger and acceptance far more than it's about the car.

And if it's just a rehash of Christine, I'll just be over here hoping hard that he'll rehash the rest of his earlier work in a like fashion. =) I could clear some shelf room for that, I think!

EFCollins
04-07-2009, 10:24 AM
Hehe.. I read Bag of Bones pretty often. That and The Shining. I reread King a lot just because he's so good at what he does. Not every writer writes great all the time, so I'm not saying he's perfect, he has some bad 'uns out there too, but he's good. Very good. I enjoy the way he writes. The Shining was the first horror book I ever read. I was 9. Needless to say, I didn't sleep for a loooong time at night after that. But, I was hooked, hooked, hooked.

Dale Emery
04-07-2009, 12:17 PM
The Colorado Kid is a mystery, sort of. It's quite sweet (in a good way).

I loved The Dead Zone, which isn't especially scary.

Dale

sunday morning
04-08-2009, 05:16 AM
Hehe.. I read Bag of Bones pretty often. That and The Shining. I reread King a lot just because he's so good at what he does. Not every writer writes great all the time, so I'm not saying he's perfect, he has some bad 'uns out there too, but he's good. Very good. I enjoy the way he writes. The Shining was the first horror book I ever read. I was 9. Needless to say, I didn't sleep for a loooong time at night after that. But, I was hooked, hooked, hooked.

Those are the ones I like to reread too. I haven't read Bag of Bones in awhile, but I'm planning on it again sometime. And I don't reread a lot...just certain books if I really loved them and feel like it. With BoB, I liked how I picked up more on it the second time through, with foreshadowing & symbolism.

The Shining's my favorite. I just reread it this year and I could read it again. :)

EFCollins
04-08-2009, 04:46 PM
I reread quite a bit. I read as much as I can and, if I can't get to the library, I reread what's in my collection. I had, at one time, over a thousand books, but I donated a lot of them to a used book store. I've always loved to read. My mother taught me when I was three out of some old Louis L'Amour westerns she read all the time. By the time I was 9, she'd given special written permission to the school library and the book-mobile to allow me to check out higher level books. Well, we had a copy of The Shining at home. I asked her if I could read it (It was the print paperback that had the silver, shiny cover with Danny's face showing through from the inside, I think) and she told me if she ever caught me with that book, I'd be grounded until I was thirty. So, I went and checked it out of the book-mobile and stowed it away in my book bag.:ROFL: I didn't tell her about that till I was... twenty or so.

As for some of King's other works, I think his short collection Nightmares and Dreamscapes is my favorite for short stories. The Moving Finger... Chattery Teeth... Popsy and The Night Flier... my favorites of his short works are all in that one collection.

jodiodi
04-11-2009, 08:13 PM
I still want to read the Dark Tower series. A coworker was telling me about it, and it sounds interesting. Especially how he puts characters from other books in it (i am kinda curious how that works). I will get to it one day.

Loved It, but it is one of his scariest, IMO. Very very good book though

One of the things I like about King is how he creates his own mythology throughout his books. He'll make references to things that happened in other books to give authenticity to his world. I remember in Pet Sematary, I believe, he refers to Cujo (the farmer who owned the dog lived in the same area). In another one (or maybe the same book) while the protagonist is driving through the town of Derry, he thinks he sees a clown with silver-dollar eyes looking out from a storm grate (the antagonist from It).

There are several other examples, but I can't remember them all at present. Still, I adore the little references. To me, they make the stories more believable, like they're grounded in his reality.

Delhomeboy
04-11-2009, 10:21 PM
One of the things I like about King is how he creates his own mythology throughout his books. He'll make references to things that happened in other books to give authenticity to his world. I remember in Pet Sematary, I believe, he refers to Cujo (the farmer who owned the dog lived in the same area). In another one (or maybe the same book) while the protagonist is driving through the town of Derry, he thinks he sees a clown with silver-dollar eyes looking out from a storm grate (the antagonist from It).

There are several other examples, but I can't remember them all at present. Still, I adore the little references. To me, they make the stories more believable, like they're grounded in his reality.

You'd probably love The Dark Tower's then. Every book he's ever written is involved in those.

S.C. Denton
05-09-2009, 01:32 PM
What stopped you on page four Ellen? The Dark Tower books are his best work. The Magnum Opus. The first Gunslinger is a very good story, but it's merely a primer of what's to come. I'd be willing to bet that there isn't another series in the world that has encompassed so many genres into what is really just one story split betwixt seven novels.

While the Gunslinger books aren't really scary they are maddeningly addictive, so... reader beware. And one other note on them that may be a bit of a spoiler: they are circuitous. Many who fail to understand the big picture of the work are unsatisfied by the ending. But once you read the whole lot of them say two or three times the whole notion of why it had to end the way it did becomes clear:

To protect the Rose, and thereby all of existence, in these worlds and the others that are so oft mentioned.



As far as departures from his usual type of stories... I'd pick up The Colorado Kid. A good novel that is comparitively short--for him.



To write is human, to edit is divine--Stephen King: ON WRITING

brainstorm77
05-09-2009, 03:25 PM
The Shining, Misery and Salem's Lot are my favs.

RikkiKane
10-08-2009, 01:04 PM
Every time I try picking up one of his novels I am bored senseless with all his exposition. Is it just me? It surprises me, because I did read his book "On Writing" and it's one of the best things I've ever read. I have really wanted to read his novels ever since but I can't seem to enjoy his work.

motormind
10-08-2009, 01:09 PM
I always feel his books could be cut by half without losing much. But the man obviously does something right, since he is raking in the cash by the truckload.

megan_d
10-08-2009, 01:09 PM
I'm sure you're not the only one who feels this way, but obviously there are a lot of people (myself included) who don't feel this way.

RikkiKane
10-08-2009, 01:10 PM
I'm sure you're not the only one who feels this way, but obviously there are a lot of people (myself included) who don't feel this way.


What are his best books do you think? I hear "The Long Walk" is pretty good?

nitaworm
10-08-2009, 01:16 PM
I liked his earlier stuff a lot. I started losing interest though after a bit. I am moody with what a I read. Sometimes I am in the mood for something slow and suspenseful. Other times I am not. What I liked about his writing was that it built, was suspenseful, and that it didn't always end happy.

kaitie
10-08-2009, 01:18 PM
It depends on the book you pick up. I think some of his books are fantastic, and some I really can't stand at all. In particular I don't tend to like his earlier books. Firestarter is one of my favorite King books that happens to be written relatively early in his career. On the other hand, I couldn't stand Christine, which is one of his most famous. One's I liked:

The entire Dark Tower series
The Long Walk (up until the end)
The Eyes of the Dragon
Hearts in Atlantis
The Stand
The Shining

Probably a couple more I really enjoyed, and quite a few that I didn't really swing either side of the fence on, but those are the ones I liked best. Actually, if you want to check out something really fantastic, read a book by Joe Hill. It's the pen name of his son, and he only has two books out (one a collection of short stories). In my opinion, he is actually better in a lot of ways than his father. I wouldn't say he could top the Dark Tower (yet), but I was very impressed.

Try picking up a book or two from completely different time periods in his life. You should be able to tell if it's just that you don't like his style, or perhaps you just don't like his books from that time. He has evolved, and I know a lot of people who are completely opposite to me and really dislike his newer works. And honestly, just because an author is famous doesn't mean they're right for you or me. I can't get through a John Grisham book, and goodness knows he sells millions. Try out a lot of different things by a lot of different writers and see what you enjoy. :)

aadams73
10-08-2009, 01:18 PM
Some people like him, some don't. Personally I prefer his earlier works such as Carrie, Cujo, It, Pet Semetary, and Christine. They had a little less waffle.

Stargazer
10-08-2009, 01:22 PM
I'm not a fan of King and havn't read much by him... Wrong genre mostly. The rest is just me being lazy.

However, I bought 'Green Mile' for my wife for christmas a couple of years ago and she never got around to reading it so I figured I may as well put the book to use. After all, the film was spectacular.

While the book was perhaps slightly overlong, and the serialised nature of it was a bit of a pain, it was alright. Parts seemed to drag, others flowed, most of it had a reasonable pace.

As with everything, it'll all come down to what 'does it' for you. For example, people raved about Luke Reinhart's (sp?) 'The Dice Man'. I wouldn't even use it as a fire-lighter.

Rob.

colealpaugh
10-08-2009, 01:22 PM
What are his best books do you think? I hear "The Long Walk" is pretty good?

I've read The Long Walk a dozen times, and I've always thought it would make an awesome movie. The intense violence from start to finish would probably makes it a tough script to market.

gothicangel
10-08-2009, 02:38 PM
I read Misery ten years ago, and never read another one since.

For me the violence was seriously over the top and added nothing to the story. He had a great opportunity for developing psychological terror in Misery; but he blew it (and the whinging about being a writer !!!) Also I found the writing style clunky, another opportunity for horror missed.

Personally, I much prefered Richard Laymon.

Parametric
10-08-2009, 02:50 PM
Love me some King. I've read nearly all of his stuff, and only The Shining and Misery and Lisey's Story failed to do it for me. It, The Stand, Cell, Pet Sematary, The Dark Tower, Hearts in Atlantis - really enjoyed them all.

Mumut
10-08-2009, 03:05 PM
I tried one book and didn't like it at all. So I didn't try again.

kaitie
10-08-2009, 03:19 PM
Oh man, I just can't get into Lisey's story. And I've tried. It's very unusual that I don't finish a book, and I just can't get through the first fifty pages. Maybe I'll pick it up again and try when I finish my current stack. It might be better once you get into it.

fringle
10-08-2009, 03:26 PM
I'm not a constant reader, but I will pick up a SK book from time to time. I usually enjoy them. On Writing was, for me, the best of the bunch. Insomnia--the worst.

rosiecotton
10-08-2009, 04:50 PM
I've read most of King's stuff. Salem's Lot is one of my faves--pacing-wise it runs like a race horse. But I also love the behemoths--The Stand, IT. I get why he turns some readers off--Lisey's Story could have been half the length and Desperation a short story!

The last of his I read was Duma Key, which I thoroughly enjoyed. It had a different vibe to anything of his I'd previously read but if his side tracks turns you off, I wouldn't recommend giving it a try! It's a very slow burn.

Charlee
10-08-2009, 05:02 PM
I have read quite a few King books and I actually enjoy most of them even though I'm not much of a horror reader.

I read his one about a car ('from a buick' is it called I can't remember) and I kept waiting for something interesting to happen. It never did and believe me that book is lloooonnnngggg! I read it to the end but only because a book has to be truely terrible for me not to finish it.

DrZoidberg
10-08-2009, 05:09 PM
I think he's a fantastic writer. Technically one of the best, just excellent. I've spent a lot of time analysing his books. His book about writing, "On Writing" is, in my opinion, the best one in it's genre.

But the stories are not for me. I think he plays it safe to the extreme and does nothing but beat down already wide open doors. After reading one of his books I mostly ask myself... Was that it? Really? Why bother even writing it? Every story always plays out in the most predictable way imaginable. As far as I'm concerned he gets by on writing talent alone. He's not exactly a deep guy. And I require that to keep me interested.

The only book with any kind of depth I've read by him was Misery, since it was a meta-story about the predicament of the professional author, who if they want to get read, have to pander to the often childish needs of their readers, and most often just having to stroke their ego's. That was a risky book since, as an under-text, he's basically yelling right at the reader, "stop being such a sensitive and pathetic nancy." I thought that was funny, anyway.

Summonere
10-08-2009, 05:22 PM
The last Stephen King book I enjoyed was Different Seasons. I'm not a fan of most of his stories, really, but I admire his ability. On Writing, though, is great.

SarahMacManus
10-08-2009, 05:29 PM
I find his horror books kind of boring. I agree about the excess of exposition. I think I've only finished one; the clown in the sewer one (?) and found myself skipping through a lot of the expo.

On the other hand, I love his literary work (like "Different Seasons") and read and reread the copy I had years ago a number of times.

Cranky
10-08-2009, 05:33 PM
For some of y'all that don't care for King's work, if you get a chance, you might want to read some of his short stories. I love King's novel's, but I think he *really* shines in short form.

Rarri
10-08-2009, 05:37 PM
I haven't read any of King's really scary writing - i have enough to keep me awake at night as it is - but The Green Mile and Shawshank Redemption are brilliant, at least, i really enjoyed reading them. Both brilliant stories.

Phaeal
10-08-2009, 06:10 PM
I've read and enjoyed most of King's work. A favorite nonfiction book is Danse Macabre, a discussion of the weird in fic and film.

Love many of the short stories, especially:

"Mrs. Todd's Shortcut"
"The Word Processor of the Gods"
"The Reach"

Favorite novels:

Salem's Lot
The Shining
The Dead Zone
Pet Sematary
Needful Things
Duma Key
The Stand (except it scared me so much I never reread it.)

I'm looking forward to Under the Dome, 'cause it's supposed to be reaaaaal long and vintage King.

Manuel Royal
10-08-2009, 06:31 PM
King needs a firm-handed editor who's willing to cut out huge chunks of extraneous matter. (And who would have kept The Tommyknockers from being published. No surprise King was out of his head on coke when he wrote it.)

He does write some great short stories, as long as he stays far away from any attempt at science fiction. He has a bright eight-year-old's conception of science.

Noah Body
10-08-2009, 06:42 PM
Every time I try picking up one of his novels I am bored senseless with all his exposition. Is it just me? It surprises me, because I did read his book "On Writing" and it's one of the best things I've ever read. I have really wanted to read his novels ever since but I can't seem to enjoy his work.

I like King, I think he's a very gifted writer who can spin some pretty incredible tales that are absolutely riveting. At the same time, he can be maudlin and overbearing--for instance, in Lisey's Story the overuse of "smuck" seemed to be worse than being hit between the eyes with a ballpeen hammer.

Yet, it made millions, and the critics loved it.

Cell was (to me) amazingly derivative--King was channeling George Romero and pretty obviously, but he can get away with it.

And oh yeah, it made millions. King can wipe his ass on a piece of paper and it would make millions in pre-sales, so you've got to respect that. :)

RedScylla
10-08-2009, 06:49 PM
As other folks have mentioned, his short stories are wonderful. Among my favorites of his novels are The Dead Zone, Salem's Lot, and The Stand, which I like to reread anytime I'm sick in bed. I haven't read anything he's written in the last 15 years, though. Just moved on at some point, but he was certainly my favorite writer when I was about 12.

ChaosTitan
10-08-2009, 06:49 PM
For some of y'all that don't care for King's work, if you get a chance, you might want to read some of his short stories. I love King's novel's, but I think he *really* shines in short form.

Ditto this. I adore his short story collections, as well as his novellas. I definitely prefer his earlier, pre-doorstopper works, but the doorstoppers are amazing, too, if you go into them with the right frame of mind.

Yes, King meanders with storylines sometimes. Yes, he writes a thousand words when a hundred will do. But he's good at it. It doesn't float everyone's boat, just like Dan Brown, Nora Roberts, Clive Cussler, and James Patterson don't float everyone's boat.

As much as I think King is a genius, a lot of people don't. S'okay. I know folks who adore Patterson--I tried one book of his, hated it, and haven't tried again.

But I do think that "The Body" (from Different Season) should be required reading for everyone. The story is just amazing.

Medievalist
10-08-2009, 06:52 PM
It's just you.

I think Steven King will be taught along with Hawthorne, Melville, Twain and Faulkner as part of the American novel canon in less than twenty years.

I'm reading King for the first time really; MacAllister gave me a list.

OK; she called it a list--it's a friggin' syllabus. I'm up to Bag of Bones, now.

I can't read King before I sleep though . . .

Libbie
10-08-2009, 06:56 PM
Every time I try picking up one of his novels I am bored senseless with all his exposition. Is it just me? It surprises me, because I did read his book "On Writing" and it's one of the best things I've ever read. I have really wanted to read his novels ever since but I can't seem to enjoy his work.

I personally don't enjoy King's style, but I certainly loved his book On Writing. It's a great how-to.

Rufus Coppertop
10-08-2009, 07:02 PM
I absolutely hated "The Long Walk". I think a book about teenage boys being shot dead for slowing down is just hideous.

I could not read "The Stand" at all, the characters were completely unappealing.

I love the "Dark Tower" series though and intend reading all of them.

thewakingself
10-08-2009, 07:05 PM
The last Stephen King book I enjoyed was Different Seasons. I'm not a fan of most of his stories, really, but I admire his ability. On Writing, though, is great.

This. Most of his novels have been very hit-or-miss for me, but I loved On Writing and Different Seasons (his shorts are, imho, pretty darn good on the whole like others have said). And I actually liked his collaborations with Peter Straub (The Talisman, Black House)--and The Stand is, of course, a classic.

Others that I've tried like Gerald's Game and Insomnia... not so much.

aadams73
10-08-2009, 07:12 PM
For some of y'all that don't care for King's work, if you get a chance, you might want to read some of his short stories. I love King's novel's, but I think he *really* shines in short form.

The Raft. My goodness. You'll never look at lakes the same way again.

Yes, I agree, his shorts are amazing.

Stew21
10-08-2009, 07:26 PM
I like several of his novels, but I agree with Cranky. His short stories are amazing!

KTC
10-08-2009, 07:27 PM
I'm a big fan of King's. He transcends genre with his epic come-to-life characters and sense of place. I learn writing every time I stick my head in a King book.

lucidzfl
10-08-2009, 07:36 PM
I actually really liked his short stories too.

Its like, when he writes a novel he feels the compunction to be needlessly verbose. When he's in short story mode he's too the point, and dead on.

1408 was fantastic. I remember reading that 10 years ago and still being scared of hotel rooms.

Strange Days
10-08-2009, 08:09 PM
I've read only Dark Tower series and Misery. Both seemed as captivating and suspenseful as a book can only be. But then, for example, I failed to finish any of John Grisham I ever started and Stephenie Meyer also bored me to death (to me- vampires are to suck blood, gore people and occasionally meditate on the lonesomness of their existence and be tortured by self-loathing- I cannot see them having a relationship. Vampires are not people.) But then- again, I'm not among the intended audiences of either Grisham or Meyer. And they are not of my taste. Yet I can easily envision a fan club of Grisham in some Law School. His audience. They will find him fascinating. Nothing is wrong with that. Just a matter of taste. For the same reason- I can see how some people might be bored with King. They are fewer in number for the reason that he originally intended most of his books for the widest possible audience (unlike Grisham and Meyer). And yet- as I see, they do exist. No author is perfect, even King. No author can satisfy tastes of ALL... :)

Delhomeboy
10-08-2009, 08:17 PM
I love pretty much everything by King; my dad has all his books, and he was the first major author I was introduced to--I'd borrow my dad's hardback copies, more or less stunned at how BIG the things were--remember, I was like 8 at the time, and thought books stuck to a 300 page or less form.

But even some of his "weaker" stuff, like The Tommyknockers and Insomnia, I couldn't put down. My one disappointment with him, ever, is the last three books of the Dark Tower series...but even them I can't call "bad." Meeting him in person is one of my biggest goals in life.

MrWrite
10-08-2009, 08:18 PM
I find King very hit and miss. I love The Dead Zone, Pet Cemetary and a few of his earlier novels. But some I just find so boring. Salem's Lot is his best work though in my opinion.

I should add I love On Writing too. His best book imo

Carlene
10-08-2009, 08:23 PM
Me too - loved his earlier works and read them all - then he started babbling. Yup, he needs a good editor. Could NOT read the book by Joe Hill - the one about the box or something? Oy. ! I thought it was terrible and only got published because of his dad.

Carlene

AnonymousWriter
10-08-2009, 08:32 PM
I have never read/attempted to read any of his novels.

firedrake
10-08-2009, 08:44 PM
I love King. He's written some real stinkers (e.g. Misery, Dolores Claiborne, etc) but he's written some real page-turners too:

The Stand
It
Pet Semetery
Salem's Lot
The Dark Tower Series

I also love 'On Writing'

I just love the way he distorts every day, small-town life by introducing horror. I like his 'voice', the humor, his imagination. I can see Medievalist's prediction about him being required High School reading coming true.

bearilou
10-08-2009, 08:48 PM
For some of y'all that don't care for King's work, if you get a chance, you might want to read some of his short stories. I love King's novel's, but I think he *really* shines in short form.


Agreed, 100%. I can't read his novels. I find them boring and difficult to get into. His novellas and short stories? Like candy. Love them to bits.

Wayne K
10-08-2009, 08:59 PM
I love King, but I will admit that the ending of The Dark Half caused me to throw it into the bar b que.