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View Full Version : What Professional Writers, Editors, and Agents Say About PA


JennaGlatzer
05-16-2006, 02:34 AM
One of the rumors PublishAmerica likes to float around is that all the people who speak out against PA are just disgruntled writers who were rejected by PA, or whose books failed because they didn't do enough promotion.

That's not reality at all, and Old Hack suggested that we should collect here posts/quotes from publishing professionals who have no "relationship" to PA, so people can see that the publishing industry is strongly opposed to PublishAmerica's misleading tactics.

So, let's keep this a very focused thread.

Here's what belongs in it:

-Short comments from professional writers, editors, and agents about why they oppose PA, and a statement to the effect of "I never submitted a manuscript to PA."

-Quotes (with links) from websites of pro writers, editors, and agents to that same effect.

No commentary in this thread, please. Use rep comments or PMs to comment, or comment in the NEPAT Overflow. This thread's strictly business. ;) Thanks!

JennaGlatzer
05-16-2006, 02:37 AM
This is Jenny Rappaport at Folio Literary Management.


Say that you've just written this great fantasy novel, and now you want to get it published. But you're at a loss to how to do this--you don't want to go with a vanity press, you don't want to self-publish it, you don't want to go anywhere near PublishAmerica (avoid them like the plague), but most of the really big-name publishing houses only take agented submissions. So what are you supposed to do? How do you get your great manuscript in front of the editors at the big publishing houses, so that they can offer you a publishing contract?

You get an agent.

http://litsoup.blogspot.com/2006/04/...gents-101.html (http://litsoup.blogspot.com/2006/04/literary-agents-101.html)

JennaGlatzer
05-16-2006, 02:44 AM
Literary agent and blogger "Miss Snark" speaks out:

Everything on this website smacks of the amateur hour.

Bottom line: it's a publishing mill. If they automate enough of the work, they can make money on the 85% they gross off your work.

So, if you want a book that is about Grandma's recipes, or poems about your relationship with your cat, or something else of sentimental value and limited marketability, these guys will be glad to benefit from your work.

http://misssnark.blogspot.com/2006/01/publishamerica.html

JennaGlatzer
05-16-2006, 02:49 AM
Charlie Petit, an attorney who specializes in intellectual property law (and posts here as Jaws), speaks out against PA in numerous places on his website:

Sometimes vanity presses try desperately to avoid being so labelled, particularly when they can't even be bothered to comply with their own contracts. One of the primary examples of this is PublishAmerica ("PA"), a vanity press based in Frederick, Maryland that preys on its authors.

http://www.authorslawyer.com/l-publishers.shtml

JennaGlatzer
05-16-2006, 03:10 AM
Lee Goldberg, a highly successful television writer (Monk, Diagnosis Murder) and author (novels and nonfiction) speaks out:


The book industry trade publication Publishers Weekly (http://www.publishersweekly.com/) is outing Publish America (http://www.publishamerica.com/) as the scam we all know that it is (http://www.publishersweekly.com/article/CA481863.html?text=%22Publish+America%22)... it seemed only the desperate, aspiring authors who "sold" their books to the publisher couldn't see it.
Until now.

http://leegoldberg.typepad.com/a_writers_life/2004/11/publish_america.html

Peggy
05-16-2006, 04:03 AM
John Scalzi (http://www.scalzi.com/whatever/003011.html) is a successful columnist, freelance writer and book author (both non-fiction and fiction). His debut novel, Old Man's War, was nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Science Fiction Novel in March 2006. Anyone who looks at PublishAmerica's practices gets the idea pretty clearly that the publisher is not in the business of selling to a mass market; it's in the business of selling to the writer and to the writer's immediate friends and anyone the writer can convince to carry the book. And of course there's a phrase that fits those kinds of publishers: Vanity publisher. His response to a commenter who praised PublishAmerica as "a deal that many small presses can't beat.": PublishAmerica is rotten for aspiring authors, for reasons amply noted above. If you say otherwise, you're either ignorant or a PublishAmerica shill. The good news is that being ignorant is correctable (http://www.steelypips.org/miscellany/publishamerica.html), so let's hope that this is your condition.

If one decides to publish on one's own, one should do it through Lulu.com or Cafepress, which do not charge to set up a publish-on-demand situation, and do not oblige one to such ridiculous contractual obligations as does PublishAmerica. It's a far better option.
http://www.scalzi.com/whatever/003418.html

icerose
05-16-2006, 04:31 AM
I don't know if you consider newspapers and news groups sources, but here are some articles.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A25187-2005Jan20

http://www.ripoffreport.com/reports/ripoff104646.htm

Maddog
05-16-2006, 05:28 AM
From Ann Crispin and Victoria Strauss

The Great PublishAmerica Hoax

A number of SFWA members (including me) have perpetrated a diabolical hoax upon PublishAmerica, a print-on-demand-based vanity publisher that poses as a "traditional" publisher in order to ensnare thousands of gullible first-time writers.

Most of the writers' advocates providing warnings about this company are speculative fiction writers. After PublishAmerica posted a venomous screed against science fiction and fantasy writers at its AuthorsMarket.net (http://www.authorsmarket.net/) website ("...writers who erroneously believe that SciFi, because it is set in a distant future, does not require believable storylines, or that Fantasy, because it is set in conditions that have never existed, does not need believable every-day characters"), a bunch of us wretched hacks decided to see how high a bar the supposedly selective PublishAmerica sets for its own books. Over the course of a weekend, thirty professional science fiction and fantasy writers and editors sat down and each banged out a chapter of a deliberately unpublishable opus entitled Atlanta Nights. Guess what: PublishAmerica accepted it.

The press release and other information (including links to a downloadable version) are here. (http://www.prweb.com/releases/2005/1/prweb202277.htm) A list of known contributors is here. (http://coldground.typepad.com/cold_ground/2005/01/atlanta_nights_.html) Sample a snippet of Atlanta Nights' immortal prose here. (http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/006032.html)

Writer Beware has received more than 100 complaints about PublishAmerica over the past few years. One PublishAmerica author recently won a judgment in an arbitration proceeding (http://www.publishamericasucks.com/arb.html) against PublishAmerica; the difficulties he experienced are typical of the complaints we've seen.

icerose
05-16-2006, 05:44 AM
http://www.authorslawyer.com/l-publishers.shtml

Sometimes vanity presses try desperately to avoid being so labelled, particularly when they can't even be bothered to comply with their own contracts. One of the primary examples of this is PublishAmerica ("PA"), a vanity press based in Frederick, Maryland that preys on its authors. At least its scheme is a little bit inventive: the authors end up paying for copies of their books, because virtually nobody else will buy them (or even can, as all but a handful of PA titles are nonreturnable and thus not stocked in bookstores).

http://www.fictionfactor.com/alerts/pa.html

http://www.todays-woman.net/poetry-scams-71.html

http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2005/publish.html

JennaGlatzer
05-16-2006, 05:57 AM
Sherwood Smith is the author of more than 25 novels. (See her bibliography here. (http://www.sff.net/people/Sherwood/biblio.htp)) She says:


I should say that I have no objection to vanity presses--the ones who are honest about the goods and services they offer. A vanity press, in fact, is perfect for some projects, where writers of niche books need a printer so they can take the product to an audience they know is waiting: a friend did this with a book about the life of an early twentieth century car designer. She had it printed by a reputable vanity press, took the book to rare car shows, and make a tidy bundle--so successful I believe she went back for a couple of printings before her market tapped out.

What I loathe and despise about PA is that their advertizing tries to suggest in every way possible short of actual promises that they distribute the book--that going with them will get your book into the big book chains.

They also claim that they reject a lot of books, and only pick publishable books. Oh yeah?

http://sartorias.livejournal.com/65204.html

JennaGlatzer
05-16-2006, 06:06 AM
My name is Jenna Glatzer, and I've never sent a manuscript to PublishAmerica or had anything rejected by PublishAmerica.

I have written books for McGraw-Hill, Simon & Schuster, Thomas Nelson, Andrews McMeel, Penguin Putnam, and others. I am a full-time writer and editor.

I oppose PublishAmerica because they purposefully mislead new writers, pretend to be selective, pretend to have real bookstore distribution, send abusive letters to their own authors, lie about how the publishing world works so they can get their authors to fork out more and more money buying their own books, etc. (You can see more of my thoughts on the "Condensed" thread.)

pepperlandgirl
05-16-2006, 08:49 AM
Jennifer Jackson, Agent
http://arcaedia.livejournal.com/74959.html


I'm sorry.... Publish America is *not* a credential. *sigh*

aruna
05-16-2006, 03:47 PM
I'm Sharon Maas, and I've had three novels published by HarperCollins, London. I've never submitted a manuscript to PublishAmerica, and I utterly despise their methods.

Their website is targeted towards members of the public inexperienced with the publishing business, and sneakily worded to make them believe that their work might be ready for publication. This is very often far from the case. It took me many years of working at my writing before I was publishable - but it was well worth the wait.

PublishAmerica doesn't want your book - they want your money!

mdin
05-17-2006, 12:20 AM
Neil Gaiman (http://www.neilgaiman.com/) mentions PublishAmerica a couple times on his blog.

(in response (http://www.neilgaiman.com/journal/2005/12/tab-closing-time.asp) to a letter from a PA author about self promotion:)

Well, there's nothing wrong with authors promoting their own work. One of the advantages of working with more traditional publishing models is that publishers have people who will do things like write catalogue copy, and write press releases and send them out, while books from traditional publishers are several thousand percent more likely to be picked up and read by book reviewers than books which are perceived as being self-published. Most authors are better writers than they are publicists, for a start, and are, as you note, better off spending their time writing than publicising, especially when, as in your case, even if they do succeed in publicising the book, people will have real trouble getting it. As the CEO of Barnes and Noble explains in this Washington Post article about PublishAmerica, (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A25187-2005Jan20.html) "if authors want their books in stores, they need to go the traditional publishing route." There are other problems with PublishAmerica as a way to get your book into people's hands -- I'd point you to http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=10211 for a useful summary.

batgirl
05-17-2006, 01:12 AM
Teresa Nielsen Hayden, a senior editor at Tor Books in NYC, says:
PublishAmerica is a vanity publisher. They'll publish anything that has enough words in it to pass muster as a book.
http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/006032.html

-Barbara

Kevin Yarbrough
05-17-2006, 01:52 AM
http://www.hipiers.com/publishing.html#P1From Peirs AnthonyDecember 2004 update: complaints continue, and PUBLISHERS WEEKLY ran an expose, saying that PA does not pay royalties. That's a no-no. My impression is that this publisher is best avoided.

Peggy
05-18-2006, 03:48 AM
There is an informative thread (http://groups.google.com/group/alt.writing.scams/browse_frm/thread/a5d525a012af4d80/73e8c1ca26b44e92) in the Usenet group alt.writing.scams from 2003, that includes the above mentioned Teresa Nielsen Hayden (http://nielsenhayden.com/) (senior editor at Tor), AW's own James D. McDonald (http://www.sff.net/people/doylemacdonald/) (novelist) and John Scalzi (http://www.scalzi.com/whatever/003011.html) (non-fiction and fiction writer)*
I'm sorry. It's a vanity publisher. They've just figured out how to charge for publishing the book at a different point in the publishing cycle.

The trick is that authors =always= want a bunch of copies of their books. Between the author's copies and the friends-and-relations copies, you can figure an average of about 75 sales per book. If the publisher does a dead-cheap production job, and sets a very high per-unit price for the book, they can make a profit even if the book never sells to readers outside the friends-and-relations group.

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.writing.scams/browse_frm/thread/a5d525a012af4d80/73e8c1ca26b44e92

* While it's true that you never can be sure of the real identity of a Usenet poster, TNH cites this thread on her own blog, in a post titled "Sneaking Out Under the Literary Radar (http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/002703.html)". Also see TNH's Atlanta Nights post linked above and "Follow the Money (http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/002692.html)" (and be sure to read the comments - several of the commenters are successful published authors).

Peggy
05-18-2006, 04:01 AM
Brian Keene horror novelist (http://www.briankeene.com/):
Many fine publishers use POD to produce their books: Wildside/Prime, Raw Dog, Eraserhead, etc. This does NOT mean they are self-publishing.

Self-publishing means that you pay someone money to print and publish your book. Sometimes it is a vanity-publisher, such as iUniverse or Publish America. Sometimes it is a printing company, such as Cafe Press or Lulu.com. In any case, YOU PAID MONEY TO GET IT OUT THERE, RATHER THAN THEM PAYING YOU FOR THE RIGHT TO PUBLISH IT. It's that simple, really. It has nothing to do with POD, other than the fact that most vanity presses (publishers who make a living enabling authors to self-publish) use POD technology.

Are we clear? Do you understand the difference between Raw Dog and iUniverse or Wildside and Lulu.com? I hope so, because I grow weary of explaining it every few months. In a nutshell: Eraserhead good. Publish America bad.
http://worlddomination101.blogspot.com/2006_03_01_worlddomination101_archive.html#1142360 56729998025

T. Nielsen Hayden
08-07-2006, 03:42 AM
There is an informative thread (http://groups.google.com/group/alt.writing.scams/browse_frm/thread/a5d525a012af4d80/73e8c1ca26b44e92) in the Usenet group alt.writing.scams from 2003, that includes the above mentioned Teresa Nielsen Hayden (http://nielsenhayden.com/) (senior editor at Tor), AW's own James D. McDonald (http://www.sff.net/people/doylemacdonald/) (novelist) and John Scalzi (http://www.scalzi.com/whatever/003011.html) (non-fiction and fiction writer)*

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.writing.scams/browse_frm/thread/a5d525a012af4d80/73e8c1ca26b44e92

* While it's true that you never can be sure of the real identity of a Usenet poster, TNH cites this thread on her own blog, in a post titled "Sneaking Out Under the Literary Radar (http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/002703.html)". Also see TNH's Atlanta Nights post linked above and "Follow the Money (http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/002692.html)" (and be sure to read the comments - several of the commenters are successful published authors). I am Teresa Nielsen Hayden, and I confirm that I am the author of the posts made under my name in the thread you cite.

I will furthermore confirm here something that I've said in conversations elsewhere, which is that Follow the Money (http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/002692.html) is primarily about PublishAmerica. I didn't say so at the time because my good friend Jim Macdonald persuaded me to be prudent. PA was less beleaguered back then, and could put more resources into retaliating against individual attackers.

I've also posted extensive remarks about PA here (http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/007815.html#137089).

Some credentials:

I started working in the mid-70s as a typesetter for various newspapers. I have also worked as an editor, line editor, copy editor, proofreader, slugger, researcher, copy writer, managing editor (trade fiction), comic book editor, literary criticism reference series editor, and consulting editor.

The only work I've ever submitted to PublishAmerica was one of the chapters of Atlanta Nights; and everyone knows how that came out.

janetbellinger
08-07-2006, 05:06 PM
It's so good to see you here, Teresa. It adds an element of official endorsement to our campaign. Usually when you feel like you've been slimed, you're not wrong. That's exactly how I feel about my experience with Publish America.

I am Teresa Nielsen Hayden, and I confirm that I am the author of the posts made under my name in the thread you cite.

I will furthermore confirm here something that I've said in conversations elsewhere, which is that Follow the Money (http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/002692.html) is primarily about PublishAmerica. I didn't say so at the time because my good friend Jim Macdonald persuaded me to be prudent. PA was less beleaguered back then, and could put more resources into retaliating against individual attackers.

I've also posted extensive remarks about PA here (http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/007815.html#137089).

Some credentials:

I started working in the mid-70s as a typesetter for various newspapers. I have also worked as an editor, line editor, copy editor, proofreader, slugger, researcher, copy writer, managing editor (trade fiction), comic book editor, literary criticism reference series editor, and consulting editor.

The only work I've ever submitted to PublishAmerica was one of the chapters of Atlanta Nights; and everyone knows how that came out.

T. Nielsen Hayden
08-07-2006, 08:40 PM
Thank you, Janet, but you truly don't need my imprimatur to know you've got heavy-duty backup in this forum. Along with much-published authors like Jim, Jenna, Victoria, and Ann (emphatically not a complete list), you've got all kinds of industry pros here. I'm not just talking about all the editors, though they're a mainstay of the forum. Christine Norris, to take just one example, genuinely knows her stuff about marketing and distribution. That makes her a real rarity in online writers' forums, and a valuable resource.

BTW, in case you find this reassuring: I'm morally certain you have more industry professionals participating here pseudonymously than the general readership is aware of. (I don't mean HapiSofi; she's out of the closet.) Respect their anonymity. They're extremely useful to have around.

James D. Macdonald
08-07-2006, 09:46 PM
I'm Jim Macdonald, and I've submitted a manuscript to PA (via a proxy).

It was accepted, of course: The infamous Atlanta Nights (http://www.lulu.com/content/102550), purposely written to be an uneditable, unpublishable mess. To no one's surprise, PA offered a contract.

While it is true that PA eventually withdrew the offer, they only did so after we announced the sting in public. The date/time stamped posts that prove this are still here on AW.

Is it fair to send an unpublishable book to a publisher? Of course it is. Writers do it every day. Publishers routinely reject those books.

What PublishAmerica's offer of a contract means isn't that they'll publish everything -- there aren't enough hours in the day -- but rather that they'll publish anything. That's beyond dispute.

aruna
08-13-2006, 06:56 PM
This is from the Wylie-Merrick Lit. Agency blog:

In the past, some authors who have found a publisher on their own have asked us to work the contract for them. This concept would work fine, except in most cases the publisher found was usually PublishAmerica or some other similar entity. If some of you aren’t familiar with PublishAmerica, let me just say this: If you are turned down by them, you must have done something to make them angry, because, otherwise, you would be published. The advance for this venture would get these writers a check of $1.00, and our take for working their contract would be a whopping 15 cents. Oh, did I forget the royalties? Darn. There’s probably a couple of bucks there, too, if the writer has a huge family and a large circle of indulgent friends.

http://wyliemerrick.blogspot.com/2006/05/totally-biased-response-dont-say-we.html

Christine N.
08-28-2006, 01:51 AM
I'm bumping this, so that anyone swayed by the recent "expert" on the PA boards will find it easily.

That, and there are quotes here by John Scalzi, who was not only nominated for a Hugo, is now a WINNER!

Ok, sorry. Didn't win that one, but did win a Campbell. My bad.

spike
10-19-2006, 09:13 PM
From http://raleva31.livejournal.com/ , Rachel Vater wrote:

I googled him and saw his books are with PublishAmerica. This is a vanity press.

Peggy
10-20-2006, 12:48 AM
From http://raleva31.livejournal.com/ , Rachel Vater wrote: The permalink for her post is : http://raleva31.livejournal.com/27197.html

This is her bio:I've been an agent at Lowenstein-Yost Associates (www.lowensteinyost.com) since January 2006. Prior to this, I worked as an assistant agent with the Donald Maass Literary Agency. Before moving to NYC, I lived in Cincinnati, Ohio and worked at Writer's Digest Books for 4 years as an editor. I grew up in Northern Kentucky.

JennaGlatzer
11-07-2006, 01:42 AM
Guys, a reminder from the first post, please:



Let's keep this a very focused thread.

Here's what belongs in it:

-Short comments from professional writers, editors, and agents about why they oppose PA, and a statement to the effect of "I never submitted a manuscript to PA."

-Quotes (with links) from websites of pro writers, editors, and agents to that same effect.

No commentary in this thread, please. Use rep comments or PMs to comment, or comment in the NEPAT Overflow. This thread's strictly business. Thanks!

I'll move the other comments to their own thread (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=45729).

Christine N.
11-07-2006, 02:56 PM
Shoot, you moved the conversation, but this quote directly impacts that, and it's a quote from a professional.

From Rachel Vater's latest blog entry...

If you have published with AuthorHouse, PublishAmerica, iUniverse, or Xlibris previously, please do not list that as a publishing credit. Because you know I’m going to look it up and find out.

otto
08-29-2007, 07:50 AM
I have one book that I contracted with Publish America. I already know they aren't any good. They have promised me 8% royalties. Do they actually pay those royalties or do I have to sue them to get them to live up to their own contract?

Gravity
08-29-2007, 07:00 PM
That's a good question, Otto. At any rate, 8% of whatever overpriced books you end up selling out of your trunk at area flea markets isn't likely to be much. Shake off the dust and write another one.

She Raven
05-07-2008, 07:56 PM
Boy, that's so easy to say when you're not the one submitting and getting rejected. My favorite comment is your MS is not what we're looking for now. Oh, you mean that the u are listed in Writer's Market as taking on mysteries, thrillers, suspense... you get the idea, and the writing is great but we just can't. The biggest racket I have ever seen, boy, I thought the medical field was nuts, quess u can tell I'm having a bad day? Well this chick is going to self publish the darn thing, to hell with the money, I just wanted to tell a great story.

Christine N.
05-07-2008, 08:25 PM
Um, She Raven, most people here HAVE been the ones submitting and getting rejected. Several times over. Have you thought about submitting your query letter here, to the Share Your Work forum, for advice? Or looking in the critique partners forum for a beta reader to see if your work couldn't be polished up a bit?

Before you go to self-publishing (not that there's anything WRONG with that) maybe you should spend some time here - there are many resources you won't find anyplace else.

And you won't spend one thin dime on them. :)

kullervo
05-07-2008, 08:54 PM
I wrote twelve novels before I sold one. Do I understand what it is to write a novel, rewrite it, submit it, and have it rejected? Over and over and over? Why yes, I do.

My fear was not that I would see my story go untold. I have more than one story to tell. I even rewrote a couple of my favorites as my writing improved.

My fear was sending a crappy novel out into the world, or even sending out one that was simply not ready for prime time. I wasn't about to demand a few hours out of the life of a fellow human being to read something that wasn't worthy. I possess basic logic; I thought the folks who published the books I loved should be able judges of what was good.

I am a writer; writing is my craft. It took me a long time to learn my craft. I am proud that I finally made it. I am very glad I didn't force my early work on anyone.

James D. Macdonald
05-07-2008, 09:16 PM
Well this chick is going to self publish the darn thing, to hell with the money, I just wanted to tell a great story.

That's fine, if what you want is for fifty or a hundred people -- who you already know by name -- to be the only ones to read your book.

If you want to find out why books get rejected, may I recommend you read Slushkiller (http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/004641.html), and take it to heart?

Gillhoughly
05-07-2008, 09:25 PM
What Uncle Jim said, She Rraven.

Perhaps a good beta reader from AW can help get that MS ready for the big leagues! But if you must self-pub, then go with Lulu--the prices will be much more reasonable for friends and family, and the book will be easier to order for on-line fans.

Typo alert for MySpace: It's spelled fiery, not firey.

Good luck!

Dertie Bertie
08-08-2008, 12:14 AM
I wouldn't send to PA if they paid me. Apparently, they don't. I'd find an indy publisher that pays for the publishing, marketing, etc, and takes their cut from the back end.

CaoPaux
08-16-2008, 08:28 PM
Author Scott Douglas: http://www.ludingtontalks.com/forum/topic/show?id=2007390%3ATopic%3A22676

stormie
08-16-2008, 08:33 PM
Glad you posted that link here, Cao. As I mentioned in another thread, Scott calls PA "Book Producers" not "Book Publishers." Very true.

DaveKuzminski
08-17-2008, 05:58 AM
Posting opinions here from professionals in the publishing industry in a central spot appears to be a good idea. It might be worthwhile to encourage more to post here. Maybe one of them will be instrumental in convincing a new writer not to sign with PA if the new writer sees a recognized professional name known to that writer stating the truth about PA.

Christine N.
08-19-2008, 04:21 PM
A blog from one of the authors at Samhain Publishing...

Friends don't let friends... (http://samhainpublishing.com/blog/2008/08/15/friends-dont-let-friends-publish-america)

Stacia Kane
08-19-2008, 06:00 PM
A blog from one of the authors at Samhain Publishing...

Friends don't let friends... (http://samhainpublishing.com/blog/2008/08/15/friends-dont-let-friends-publish-america)


Umm..they're giving the guy 100 free copies of his book in exchange for legal help with "some people trying to sue them"? Shouldn't a judge be notified of that? It sounds kind of like a conflict of interest to me (but of course I don't actually know, I'm not an attorney.)

spike
08-19-2008, 10:00 PM
Umm..they're giving the guy 100 free copies of his book in exchange for legal help with "some people trying to sue them"? Shouldn't a judge be notified of that? It sounds kind of like a conflict of interest to me (but of course I don't actually know, I'm not an attorney.)

No conflict if he is acting as their legal counsil. However, the IRS frowns upon barter.

Christine N.
08-19-2008, 11:57 PM
I read it as she was asking if he would be getting 100 ARC's. If you read on, "Gary" asked what an ARC was. He had no clue.

Stacia Kane
08-20-2008, 01:07 AM
I just didn't know if it was a conflict for him to rep the house publishing his book.

spike
08-20-2008, 04:22 PM
I just didn't know if it was a conflict for him to rep the house publishing his book.

Nope, the lawyer whose office computers I do tech support for does my legal work.

It's just business networking.

James D. Macdonald
08-21-2008, 03:29 PM
Why are they asking some guy to do legal work for them on a barter basis if they have Vic on staff?

Eirin
08-26-2008, 04:36 PM
Why are they asking some guy to do legal work for them on a barter basis if they have Vic on staff?

The question is the answer.

//End pompous voice//

*Runs for cover*

Christine N.
08-26-2008, 05:17 PM
Oh, okay, I misread it. They ARE giving him a hundred free copies.

So, essentially they're paying the guy $200 or so for his legal advice? Assuming they use the big Xerox machine, it can't cost more than $2/copy. Let's be generous and say $5. So $500 for legal help? Guess who got the better end of THAT deal?

allenparker
08-26-2008, 05:51 PM
No conflict if he is acting as their legal counsil. However, the IRS frowns upon barter.

Actually, there is a form for reporting barter deals. IRS is fine so long as you report the receivable side as income.

Why are they asking some guy to do legal work for them on a barter basis if they have Vic on staff?

I am just guessing, but Mr. Cretella is probably not a member of every bar. There is a difference between how each state and even each court handles cases and trials. They may see a benefit in having a local person represent them.

It may just be that they saw a chance to save some bucks on legal fees and this guy saw a chance to grab a few books for his clients.

Karen Duvall
11-17-2008, 01:44 AM
Agent Colleen Lindsay of Fine Print Literary has listed among her reasons for rejecting a query:

You told me that you were previously published by someone like PublishAmerica...and meant it. This is akin to telling me that you would consider yourself previously published if you had Xeroxed pages of your manuscript and stapled them together.

This was from her blog. You can find the rest of her reasons here (http://theswivet.blogspot.com/2008/11/why-i-may-have-rejected-your-query.html).

Alphabeter
11-17-2008, 04:52 AM
Any takers on betting when the POSITIVE PA PEOPLE will go a'commentin'?

Christine N.
11-17-2008, 05:50 AM
Positive PA people don't read industry blogs. They stay safe inside the PA cocoon.

circlexranch
12-15-2008, 02:34 AM
Here's another good one (http://www.newsreview.com/sacramento/bibliolatry/blogs/post?oid=659278)written in April of this year by a book critic in a major city.

Which brings me to another bitch about the stuff that’s sent for review from such outfits as PublishAmerica, iUniverse, xLibris, Trafford, etc.: I distinctly get the impression that these writers don’t read very much. If they did, they might recognize a clichè when they wrote one. (Hint: the good writers I know—and I know a number of them—read at least three times as much as they write. They read widely. They’re curious.)

Ouch . . .

stormie
12-15-2008, 11:12 PM
Oh, but so, so true!

robertmblevins
02-06-2009, 09:34 AM
It's not happening anymore, but back in 2007-08 I used to receive the occasional eMail from different PA writers who would ask my advice on how to extricate themselves from their PA contracts.

These eMails came to me because of threads concerning PA over at Kent Brewster's now-gone Speculations site. I won't discuss those threads here. (Besides, most of you reading this understand about the Speculations threads)

Don't know why I posted this, really. Just thought someone should know.

Robert Blevins
Managing Editor
Adventure Books of Seattle
The Escape Velocity Magazine

stormie
02-06-2009, 06:01 PM
Glad you posted this. Maybe PAers are doing their own research and coming here for advice. This is the best place for help.

MMcQuown
08-27-2009, 01:32 AM
I wonder what PA would do if they actually got a salable book. Has it ever happened? Would anyone know?

M.R.J. Le Blanc
08-27-2009, 01:41 AM
They wouldn't know if they had a salable book. They don't read them, they just print and overcharge them.

JulieB
08-27-2009, 01:46 AM
Wasn't there the story a while back of an author who had convinced some local grocery stores to stock her book - and then the contract was canceled? Maybe I'm confusing that with something else.

writergirlindistress
09-22-2009, 08:31 AM
Jennifer Jackson, Agent
http://arcaedia.livejournal.com/74959.html


I read this quote...
But I am wondering, how do you know what is a real publishing credit?
Like, I have been published with Hustler, Tit-elation.com and I have had poetry published in many different anthologies, most of which I still have the names. Will these work on my resume?

Cyia
09-22-2009, 08:36 AM
Real publishing credit = paid manuscript from a reputable publisher or publication people have actually heard of. (Paid in money or prestige, as some of the smaller, prestigious, mags pay only token amounts, if at all, but being included in them is a big deal.)

The point is that the work has to be vetted. It has to be read, evaluated, edited, and held up against all of the other work in the same category and deemed better or more well suited by someone who knows what they're doing.

ChristineR
11-10-2009, 06:21 PM
I read this quote...
But I am wondering, how do you know what is a real publishing credit?
Like, I have been published with Hustler, Tit-elation.com and I have had poetry published in many different anthologies, most of which I still have the names. Will these work on my resume?

The mags would count for a lot if you were trying to sell to Playboy or Penthouse, far more than a PA book.

CaoPaux
11-10-2009, 06:45 PM
I've ported some general stuff to Overflow. Please keep this thread to examples of what industry professionals say about PA, and discussion of same. Thanks.

Gillhoughly
11-10-2009, 08:18 PM
ChristineR-- a single PAYING piece, short or long, counts more with the editor of a commercial publishing house than 20 titles placed with PA.

My future editor at the time called about my first novel and asked if I'd ever sold anything--it was her opening question!

Discounting a letter to the editor written in high school :D, I said I sold five pieces in the last two years to a small magazine in the Midwest. She was quite happy with that.

It told her that I produced stuff regularly, knew to send it to a paying market, and that another editor thought enough about my words to buy them. Maybe it was only a nickle a word, but it was good enough!

Sorry PA Lurkers--but getting paid one dollar for a whole novel just doesn't cut it. Commercial editors should be all about symbolism in the books, not checkbooks.

Christine N.
01-27-2010, 02:42 AM
Coming in with a new quote, this one from Colleen Lindsay, an agent at Fine Print Literary: (regarding things that would be an instant reject in a query letter) " You told me that you were previously published by someone like PublishAmerica… and meant it. This is akin to telling me that you would consider yourself pr...eviously published if you had Xeroxed pages of your manuscript and stapled them together."

http://kathytemean.wordpress.com/2010/01/25/agent-colleen-lindsay-gives-query-letter-tips/

circlexranch
03-03-2010, 02:11 AM
I'm double-dipping this post on the NNEPAT because that is where the discussion originated. However, it belongs in here to be archived with the other agents opinions of PA.

Uber-agent Janet Reid had this to say about the PublishAmerica - Random House debacle in her blog. (http://jetreidliterary.blogspot.com/2010/02/shameful.html)

I mention this because I don't want you to start ranting that I'm anti-POD, or anti-self publishing when I tell you that PublishAmerica's latest endeavor to separate writers from their hard-earned money infuriates me.

It preys on people's hopes and dreams, and uses their lack of knowledge specifically and intentionally to make them buy something the company knows is unlikely to achieve the results implied. (Implied of course is key. They don't actually tell you it works, they let you believe the implication.)

There's lots more, Ms. Reid didn't hold back . . .

kullervo
04-03-2010, 08:28 AM
Lynn Price at Behler Publications:

http://behlerblog.wordpress.com/2010/04/02/more-on-how-they-get-you/

kullervo
07-21-2010, 08:29 PM
Think you're published? Think again:

http://editorialanonymous.blogspot.com/2010/06/high-ho-sparkles-away.html

Gillhoughly
07-23-2010, 09:53 PM
Writer Jim C. Hines blogs about PA (http://jimhines.livejournal.com/518985.html).

Working Spy
08-03-2010, 06:43 PM
Gullible does not begin to describe me. Perhaps egotiscal, maybe, given the right kind of flattery even - stupid. Whatever the case may be I've found out the hard way that PA is all that I have been reading about here at the writers water cooler. What I humble myself to ask al of you who have published - what do I do now? I want my book back. how do I go about that? Can I change the title (GACK %$^&+*&$#)? Change my name? HELP!!

Jill Karg
08-03-2010, 07:33 PM
I am not defending PA but I am an author that has been published by them (recently July 18th release). I would say that some of the comments above were very nasty.

Just for the record as a PA author, I do read. My favorite authors from the old school: Hemmingway, Poe, Shakespeare and from the new school: Clive Cussler, John Gardner, Sebastian Faulk to name a few. I have always and will always have a thirst for knowledge. I am educated (bachelor degree in MIS) and have been a technical writer. My book might be published by a not so nice publisher but it doesn't mean the quality is sub-average or poor.

I will not be using PA for the second book in my series, and I will be searching out an agent. I feel the agents that snub their noses at those that have been published even by PA are not worth having. I want someone that looks at the work in front of them, the synopsis and sample chapters and decides then if the work and author is good enough to support.

I truly believe that you do attract more bees with honey instead of vinegar. And yes that is a cliché. And cliché is a French term that is overused also.

My grandmother had a thousand of them. My all time favorite is “Don’t judge someone unless you are willing to walk in their shoes. or Don't judge a book by it's cover.”

I am published author and I am proud of that fact. I will have success even if it is with the second book of the series of seven. Yes, I said seven. All these books are more than 500 pages long with many plots lines, many characters and dialogue that can stand the test of reading it out loud.

I don’t pretend to know what these agents were looking at to say such harsh comments but I do know it wasn’t my work.
:Soapbox:

Ok done.

Cyia
08-03-2010, 08:00 PM
Hi Jill.

I'm sorry you think the comments are harsh, but that's the reality of writing and publishing. It's a harsh business, and everyone doesn't get to play along. Writing a book is only one step of it, finding a legit agent or publisher or both is another. And to do that, you have to do your due diligence.

Using PA implies you have access to the internet, since it's an on-line submission process. If you have the internet, you have the ability to research, and it takes less than twenty minutes to check PA (or any other publisher) out.

I can only speak to my own experience, but I was practically on-line illiterate when I started a serious attempt at getting published. I made serious mistakes because I didn't know any different (at the time, my on-line capabilities were limited to "get on-line, send e-mail, be quick") but once I was able to start Googling people and places, it wasn't difficult to see who was legit and who wasn't. (Thankfully I'd found P&E straight off) I think I found AW on like my 3rd search, while checking on an agent, and I
double checked their information, found enough other sources to corroborate it , and moved on. There's so much information out there now on PA and its practices that anyone should be able to do the same.

Bookstores frown on PA, and avoid their authors, because they know from experience what to expect. They're used to stone walls, and the (usually 5%) lousy discounts. They're used to sub-standard merchandise. They're used to getting stuck with books that won't sell. And they're used to wide-eyed authors who've been instilled with the sense of entitlement that comes with being told they're "just like" Stephen King and Nora Roberts when they're not. Only Stephen King and Nora Roberts are like Stephen King and Nora Roberts, no matter how successful another writer may or may not become.

The agents who say PA isn't something to be bragged about do so because they know, if you're still considering a PA book "published", you haven't done your due diligence. You haven't done the basics, and that means you probably haven't put any more time or effort into researching them, either.

It would be like showing up for a job interview and asking the person doing the interview how to do the job you want. You should already know, and it's not their fault you don't.

This is going to sound nasty, but -- you are NOT a published author, not if you're counting PA as your publishing credit. You ARE an author; you are not published. It counts no more or less than if you'd gone to Kinko's printed your book out, and had it bound.

I've had things "published" on fanfiction.net, and comparatively, it's the same tier of credit as PA. The only difference is, I know people have read what I wrote and they didn't have to pay a ridiculous amount of money to do it. (And I've never been asked to purchase copies.)

Marian Perera
08-03-2010, 08:14 PM
My book might be published by a not so nice publisher but it doesn't mean the quality is sub-average or poor.
If you needed to fill a job opening and someone showed up saying, "My diploma is from an internet university which hands them out to everyone who sends a check but it doesn't mean I'm a bad worker", what would you think?

Maybe it's true. Maybe that person is the most intelligent and most qualified person to apply for the job. But the fact that he went to a diploma mill (and then brought it up at all, rather than keeping quiet about it) is a huge warning sign. Most employers aren't going to look favorably on that.

I will not be using PA for the second book in my series, and I will be searching out an agent. I feel the agents that snub their noses at those that have been published even by PA are not worth having. I want someone that looks at the work in front of them, the synopsis and sample chapters and decides then if the work and author is good enough to support. Reputable agents tend to be swamped with queries on top of selling manuscripts and negotiating rights for their current clients. As a result, most of them only have the time to look at queries (rather than sample chapters, synopsis, etc). If the query is poorly written they're likely to take a pass.

If the query mentions the writer's PA-printed books as publication credits, that tells the agent that the writer is unaware of what's expected or what's done in the publishing industry. It's not a good idea to apply for a job and then show that you're not aware of what the job expectations are.

The agents are not snubbing their noses at you. Don't take it personally or you'll end up being even more disappointed.

My grandmother had a thousand of them. My all time favorite is “Don’t judge someone unless you are willing to walk in their shoes. or Don't judge a book by it's cover.”If books weren't judged by their covers, publishers wouldn't bother spending money on cover art.

I am published author and I am proud of that fact.

Be as proud as you like. Just don't expect the publishing industry to recognize your PA book as a publishing credit, because it's not.

Momento Mori
08-03-2010, 08:29 PM
Jill Karg:
I would say that some of the comments above were very nasty.

I understand why you'd find some of the comments here quite difficult to read, but everything said here is true.

Jill Karg:
Just for the record as a PA author, I do read. My favorite authors from the old school: Hemmingway, Poe, Shakespeare and from the new school: Clive Cussler, John Gardner, Sebastian Faulk to name a few. I have always and will always have a thirst for knowledge. I am educated (bachelor degree in MIS) and have been a technical writer. My book might be published by a not so nice publisher but it doesn't mean the quality is sub-average or poor.

The problem though is that you've been published by a vanity publisher and the vast majority of other PA authors are not regular readers (many say as much in the PA discussion boards) and the books they have released through PA are not very well written.

That's what is so insidious about PA - they publish anything regardless of quality. In esence, they are publishing slush. As a result, while your book might be great (and there are books with PA that could easily have found a commercial publisher had the author done their research in advance) it will never, ever get the audience it deserves and it will be tainted by its association with a publisher that does not care about quality.

Jill Karg:
I will not be using PA for the second book in my series, and I will be searching out an agent.

Unless your second book in the series works as a stand alone, you may find it difficult to get an agent. It's very difficult to find an agent for a book or series where first publishing rights have been exhausted (which is what happens when you go with PA) unless you've managed to get significant sales for that first book. You may be better off abandoning the series completely and working on something completely different.

Jill Karg:
I feel the agents that snub their noses at those that have been published even by PA are not worth having.

You're misinterpreting what the agents are saying. Agents do not regard PA as a publishing credit - therefore if you list your PA book in a query letter as being an example of your having been commercially published, they will view you as an amateur (ditto if you query a novel that's already been published by PA) and your query is more likely to be set to one side.

As regards whether the agent is worth having - all of the agents quoted on this thread are people worth having on the basis that they represent some best selling authors and can (and have) negotiated good deals for their clients.

You might not like that attitude, but that's the reality you face given the PA situation. The good news is that you are not alone and there are plenty of people in this Forum who have been with PA and who have gone on to get agents and commercial publishing deals.

Jill Karg:
I truly believe that you do attract more bees with honey instead of vinegar. And yes that is a cliché. And cliché is a French term that is overused also.

That's not a great analogy. Again, not liking the way the message is being presented doesn't make the message any less true.

Jill Karg:
My all time favorite is “Don’t judge someone unless you are willing to walk in their shoes. or Don't judge a book by it's cover.”

Great sayings. Shame they don't apply in this case.

PA is known as a vanity publisher. Therefore its authors are judged to be vanity published. The only way you can mitigate that is through your sales, which you will never get with PA.

Jill Karg:
I am published author and I am proud of that fact.

Yes, you are published but you have been badly published by a vanity outfit.

Jill Karg:
I will have success even if it is with the second book of the series of seven. Yes, I said seven. All these books are more than 500 pages long with many plots lines, many characters and dialogue that can stand the test of reading it out loud.

I hope that you do have success, but you won't with PA.

Jill Karg:
I don’t pretend to know what these agents were looking at to say such harsh comments but I do know it wasn’t my work.

Those agents were looking at work produced by your fellow PA authors. Your work may well be great, but the fact that so much from PA isn't, will taint it.

For that reason, you're better off not mentioning PA at all when querying an agent and let your work stand or fall on its own merits.

MM

Chris P
08-03-2010, 08:58 PM
Hi Jill. I too am a PA author, and I understand what you are saying. In effect, you are walking in my shoes, three years after I walked in the shoes of thousands of other PA authors. I have chosen not to use PA again for specific reasons.

I've said this before and I still believe it: If you can find a way to make PA's approach to publishing fulfill your needs as a writer, then go for it! However, there are four things that PA does that makes it more difficult for me to meet my goals: 1) their prices, 2) their marketing approach (99% of efforts are to the authors and not readers or bookstores, poor discount, no/shoddy return policy, etc), 3) their antics (deleting rather than addressing legitimate concerns of authors on their message board, sending threatening letters to their authors) and 4) no publication standards (they'll publish anything that doesn't open themselves to a liability--and even then they sometimes do).

As to the nastiness, I've made a choice to avoid a certain brand of PA-bashing that is sometimes seen on this board, sometimes dishearteningly so by people I respect. But, that's a choice I have made for myself and the image I wish to present on this board. I have no desire to get onto anyone else for how they wish to present themselves.

I discuss my experiences with PA, and until they stopped sending me email discount offers I presented these offers, unvarnished but with my impressions of them, on this board in various threads. My own experience is my experience, and these offers are what PA has been saying about itself. It's not necessary to say much else, in my opinion.

PS: I wonder if a mod should split this discussion into a new thread? The OP gave specific guidance on the content of this thread.

kullervo
08-03-2010, 09:10 PM
So you've locked the first book in a series into a contract that will last seven years. You've sold first publication rights to a notorious vanity press. Think they're not? They admit it:

http://bb.publishamerica.com/viewtopic.php?t=31473

Nobody in the publishing industry thinks this is a publishing credit, but at the same time all story rights, character rights, etc., now belong to them for seven years. Whether by accident or design you are now playing Author — the Roleplaying Game rather than going through the pain of hunting for a legitimate agent and publisher. That is not an easy thing to undo.

The diploma mill analogy is apt, except the diploma received would have to cost three times as much as Harvard. You've got a $35 paperback on your hands. How do you expect to sell that?

CaoPaux
08-03-2010, 09:31 PM
PS: I wonder if a mod should split this discussion into a new thread? The OP gave specific guidance on the content of this thread.Mmm, it's going a little far afield, but I'm inclined to let the discussion develop some more before deciding where/how to split it out. http://foolstown.com/sm/budo.gif

merrihiatt
08-03-2010, 10:13 PM
Gullible does not begin to describe me. Perhaps egotiscal, maybe, given the right kind of flattery even - stupid. Whatever the case may be I've found out the hard way that PA is all that I have been reading about here at the writers water cooler. What I humble myself to ask al of you who have published - what do I do now? I want my book back. how do I go about that? Can I change the title (GACK %$^&+*&$#)? Change my name? HELP!!

Welcome, Working Spy! :welcome: I was afraid your post was going to get lost amid the other comments.

You are not stupid. You signed a contract without fully knowing who you were dealing with. Some people have had success at getting their rights returned by sending polite letters stating they are not in a position to purchase books or promote their work and they'd like the rights returned. That didn't work for me. I tried for two years. I ended up paying the $99 reversion of rights fee to get my rights returned. I'm not saying that's the best idea out there, just putting it out there.

I hope you'll check out other areas of the site, as well. There are a lot of wonderful people here who will help you find your way through the publishing maze.

Unimportant
08-04-2010, 04:35 AM
Working Spy, Merri is correct. I'll also add: No, you cannot change the title or your name and sell the same rights to another publisher. You have legally contracted those rights to Publish America. You either have to get them to agree to return the rights, or wait until the contract runs out.

Jill Karg
08-04-2010, 04:39 AM
ok going to clear up a few things....

I have been published through gov't pubs at work "co wrote" supplemental guides. These guides are no longer in print. I also have written for the postal services in house and published gov't documents to a division that is no longer in existence. I also wrote short stories and poems for a literary magazine in college locally. :Lecture:

I did do research and found equal for and against PA. Hindsight, it was a mistake to go with them. But it wasn't because of ego or lack of research. I waited 8 months for rejections from both agents and publisher alike and I didn't submit it to multiple publishers or agents at the same time, (in the course of several years). I was patience and again went down my list. :Headbang:

Yes I would prefer correspondence through computer aka I'm a computer person. I will not be mention PA directly in the querying. But when asked by an agent I will tell them the truth. :e2BIC:

I have written other series of books that I can easily go with and might try to market them first they are not a scifi series. I also have read them in writers groups I am in locally. The writer groups love them and only liked the scifi books.

Another point, I checked contract again after reading post the other 6 books are not under contract with PA nor are the characters. I signed for only "The Work" not for a series, one single book.

This is last post I will defend myself and if you wish to pick it apart so be it. But again, people make mistakes.:deadhorse

JulieB
08-04-2010, 04:53 AM
Hi, Jill.

Yes, you made a mistake. We all make 'em.

I'm convinced one reason that writers do go with PA or someone else not suitable for their work is that they don't know enough about how the publishing industry works. One of the things we try to do here is educate people on that topic.

I should point out that this particular thread is about what pro writers, editors, and agents say about PA. We're generally quoting from their blogs, and agents and editors have a tendency to be blunt about this sort of thing sometimes.

Once again, we're not here to chastise you for your mistake. Live and learn, pick up the pieces and move on. It's the best most of us mere humans can do, and I honestly wish you the best.

Unimportant
08-04-2010, 04:55 AM
Jill, no one is saying that you personally are a bad writer or a bad person or anything like that. We are saying that Publish America is well known in the publishing industry, and that there is a taint by association.

PA's contract has changed many times over the years. Sometimes they included an options clause that gives them the right of first refusal on subsequent works by the author, so we always advise people to check their contracts to make sure they are legally free to submit their next books to other publishers.

Marian Perera
08-04-2010, 05:04 AM
I didn't submit it to multiple publishers or agents at the same time, (in the course of several years).

Just one point - it's OK to query agents and publishers simultaneously. I generally send out queries in batches of 5 to 10 at a time. My publisher is also fine with simultaneous submissions of manuscripts to other houses, as long as they're informed about it.

Kweei
08-04-2010, 05:49 AM
Jumping in for a sec...

Jill, you don't need to defend yourself here. I understand a lot of what you're hearing is not what you'd like to hear and no one is questioning or doubting your intelligence or your commitment to your writing.

The truth is that many people here have been dealing with PA for a long time, either as former PA authors or those that just want to warn people. Yes, it can get snarky sometimes, and yes it's not always easy to hear, but I swear that these posts are made to help. There are tons of people on this board with extensive experience as published authors and know how the industry works. They don't want to sugar coat anything for new people to AW. They want people to know what is expected of you and what publishing is like (or supposed to be) based on their experiences.

I hope you can settle in here at the forum and find a home. We all love writing here, in some way or another, and want everyone to be successful.

amergina
09-09-2010, 05:22 AM
The Query Shark (aka Literary agent, Janet Reid) just chomped (as she is wont to do) on a query from an author who uses PA as a credential:

http://queryshark.blogspot.com/2010/09/176.html

The important bit:

Dear Query Shark:

I am the author of (redacted), published by Publish America.

And that's where I stop reading. If you've had a book printed by any of these template houses that profess to publish but in fact do not offer any of the additional value of a publisher, for the love of Mike, don't mention it. Ever.

This is not a publishing credential. It's also a huge disadvantage. Once you've published a book, you're no longer a debut author. It's MUCH easier to sell a debut novel than a second or third from a writer who hasn't enjoyed robust sales.

Ms. Reid pulls no punches.

circlexranch
09-10-2010, 06:44 AM
YEE-OUCH!

At least the writer took her punch square and admitted she had a ton of work to do on the chewed up and spit out bits of query left by the sharky one.

Terri

CaoPaux
03-31-2012, 07:06 PM
Via Writer Beware Blogs!, editors report being approached by PA's "literary agency". http://www.accrispin.blogspot.com/2012/03/publishamerica-literary-agent-inside.html