PDA

View Full Version : Dropped 'G' and punctuation



Ambri
05-28-2011, 01:50 AM
So, I have a character who uses some slang, including "darlin'" with a dropped g. Of course, sometimes it's at the end of a sentence, so I'm trying to figure out the punctuation. Is it:

"What's wrong, darlin'?"
"Come here, darlin',"
"Sweet, sweet darlin'."

Or:

"What's wrong, darlin?'"
Etc etc

I think it's the first version, but I think it just looks kinda odd, either way. If I had access to my well-worn copy of Strunk and White I could probably answer this myself, but it's packed away in some far recess of the dark and dreaded closet. :tongue









Hmm, that thread title sounds oddly like a band name . . .

mirandashell
05-28-2011, 01:56 AM
It's the first one. The second one looks odd.

Jamesaritchie
05-28-2011, 03:24 AM
Your first three examples are correct. Punctuation doesn't change because you replace a letter with an apostrophe.

Chase
05-28-2011, 11:42 AM
"What's wrong, darlin'?"
"Come here, darlin',"
"Sweet, sweet darlin'."


As James said, the apostrophe at the end of darlin' shouldn't be confused with a single end quote mark. Although they look the same, they have different functions.

Your versions above are correct.

Castle Pokemetroid
05-28-2011, 01:16 PM
This has answered my own question. The ' replaces a letter and is treated as one.

I got it.

Ambri
05-29-2011, 11:28 AM
Thanks. Yet another example of the various ways in which I overthink things.

JayMan
05-29-2011, 05:03 PM
In On Writing, Stephen King wrote an example in which he gave an example of something or other, and wrote some of the dialogue without an apostrophe at the end of words. For example, "I don't know why you keep askin me about it." (it's on pg 132)

He mentioned that you could discuss a lot of things about the passage, such as "the decision not to use the apostrophe where the speaker has dropped a g," but he doesn't go on to actually explain that point.

Although I'm firmly in the "use an apostrophe" camp, does anybody know what the justification might be for not using one? I always figured it was a matter of grammar/punctuation and not style.

Chase
05-29-2011, 06:23 PM
Although I'm firmly in the "use an apostrophe" camp, does anybody know what the justification might be for not using one?

I was introduced to King's dropped final apostrophe in a contraction by a beta reader who encouraged the same with evangelical fervor. We parted ways because I went right on with the conventional darlin' and somethin' in dialog and first person.

An ardent reader of all King's works, I note he carries out the practice in later books but so far has left internal apostrophes alone. The quirk is a puzzle to me, too.

jdm
05-29-2011, 06:37 PM
Just be careful. I did a lengthy work in which most of my characters dropped their g on the ing words. Problem was, by the time I got finished with the bazillion final edits and re-reads, I was dropping the g in my own speech. lol. Has anyone else ever found themselves starting to talk like the characters they have nurtured for so long? Sort of like actors who stay in character even when they are not acting. I may post this as a separate thread somewhere just to see if other people are as whacky about that type of thing as i am.

Jamesaritchie
05-29-2011, 07:24 PM
In On Writing, Stephen King wrote an example in which he gave an example of something or other, and wrote some of the dialogue without an apostrophe at the end of words. For example, "I don't know why you keep askin me about it." (it's on pg 132)

He mentioned that you could discuss a lot of things about the passage, such as "the decision not to use the apostrophe where the speaker has dropped a g," but he doesn't go on to actually explain that point.

Although I'm firmly in the "use an apostrophe" camp, does anybody know what the justification might be for not using one? I always figured it was a matter of grammar/punctuation and not style.

Some just think the apostrophe isn't needed, and looks bad. Trouble is, if you do this, you need to be careful about which Gs you drop.

I know from editing that even words that shouldn't can sometimes throw you. I remember reading the word "somethin" in a manuscript, and had to read it a second time for context before I realized it was supposed to be "something", rather than some thin.

If I have to read anything twice, the writer loses me.

It makes no more sense to drop an apostrophe with a dropped G that it does to remove the apostrophe from any contraction.

Chase
05-30-2011, 01:43 AM
I remember reading the word "somethin" in a manuscript, and had to read it a second time for context before I realized it was supposed to be "something", rather than some thin.

It makes no more sense to drop an apostrophe with a dropped G that it does to remove the apostrophe from any contraction.

The slippery slope becomes even more treacherous when, as James implies, interior apostrophes are dropped.

I'll becomes ill, the it's-its confusion worsens, won't (will not) becomes wont (a habit or mannerism), and so on.

L'ets not even get started on the fun of misplaced or curiously added apostrophe's.

Nick Blaze
05-30-2011, 02:30 AM
The slippery slope becomes even more treacherous when, as James implies, interior apostrophes are dropped.

I'll becomes ill, the it's-its confusion worsens, won't (will not) becomes wont (a habit or mannerism), and so on.

L'ets not even get started on the fun of misplaced or curiously added apostrophe's.
The latter reminds of terrible Japanese Visual Kei bands that like their names to have no grammatical sense. 'It just looks cool,' they say. Examples: Aliene Ma'riage (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aliene_Ma%27riage), Zi:Kill (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zi:Kill), La'cryma Christi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La%27cryma_Christi), D'erlanger (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%27erlanger), D=Out (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%3DOut), just to name some. Oh, Japan.

Worse is when people start adding umlauts to words.

absitinvidia
05-30-2011, 03:37 AM
In On Writing, Stephen King wrote an example in which he gave an example of something or other, and wrote some of the dialogue without an apostrophe at the end of words. For example, "I don't know why you keep askin me about it." (it's on pg 132)

He mentioned that you could discuss a lot of things about the passage, such as "the decision not to use the apostrophe where the speaker has dropped a g," but he doesn't go on to actually explain that point.

Although I'm firmly in the "use an apostrophe" camp, does anybody know what the justification might be for not using one? I always figured it was a matter of grammar/punctuation and not style.


I've edited books in which the decision was taken to omit the apostrophe simply because there were so many of them, and it was difficult to read the dialogue. Unfortunately this isn't one of those cases where you can describe the speech pattern and use normal spelling (as you could say someone speaks with a thick Scottish accent and then use standard spelling in the dialogue, rather than rendering it phonetically).

JayMan
05-30-2011, 05:28 AM
Ah, all the things noted in the posts above make sense. Reading this thread, I can feel my brain expanding. Or maybe that's the encephalitis. Either way, I feel more knowledgeable.


Worse is when people start adding umlauts to words.
Unless you're in a heavy metal band. In that case, the more, the better.

Nick Blaze
05-31-2011, 04:51 AM
Ah, all the things noted in the posts above make sense. Reading this thread, I can feel my brain expanding. Or maybe that's the encephalitis. Either way, I feel more knowledgeable.


Unless you're in a heavy metal band. In that case, the more, the better.
To be honest, as an avid metal listener, I can't think of a single one with an umlaut... unless they're German. Hahaha! :P

Fallen
05-31-2011, 10:48 AM
I was introduced to King's dropped final apostrophe in a contraction by a beta reader who encouraged the same with evangelical fervor. We parted ways because I went right on with the conventional darlin' and somethin' in dialog and first person.

An ardent reader of all King's works, I note he carries out the practice in later books but so far has left internal apostrophes alone. The quirk is a puzzle to me, too.

When you get paid as much as King does, you can leave a book blank and say it's the latest quirk and get away without getting a slap. The rest of us mere mortals ware red cheeks.

Hell, he'll be promoting phonetic spelling in schools next (crap, that's already been tried by one writer).

But I think it's just due phonetics. If someone says darlin, why stick an apostrophe on the end to show the author knows how to spell properly?

Grrrrrrrrr

AmsterdamAssassin
05-31-2011, 10:57 AM
To be honest, as an avid metal listener, I can't think of a single one with an umlaut... unless they're German. Hahaha! :P

Mötorhead?

poetinahat
05-31-2011, 11:47 AM
And Mötley Crüe

But hmmm, both of those bands have been around for a quarter of a century or more.

absitinvidia
06-01-2011, 12:45 AM
Don't forget Queensr˙che and Blue Öyster Cult.

Nick Blaze
06-02-2011, 03:09 PM
Mötorhead?

I stand corrected.


And Mötley Crüe

Not considered metal.


Queensr˙che and Blue Öyster Cult.

Metal and horribly not metal, respectively. But yes, I stand corrected. :P

JayMan
06-02-2011, 05:18 PM
Motley Crue is considered glam metal!

Nick Blaze
06-02-2011, 06:18 PM
Motley Crue is considered glam metal!
Yup, just as Slipknot is considered nu-metal. But a dragonfly is neither a dragon nor a fly; nu-metal nor glam metal are metal. Just different kinds of hard rock.

JayMan
06-02-2011, 06:44 PM
I'd have to disagree. "Metal" and "heavy metal" themselves are just types of rock, and they tend to be heavier than "hard rock". You could also say that there are no metal bands, period, just different kinds of rock, but that wouldn't help very much in drawing genre boundaries (which tend to overlap as it is). Glam metal is also metal because it's heavier than hard rock, generally, but it's also distinct from other types of metal (like speed, thrash, death, etc). One need only compare Crue to traditional hard rock outfits like AC/DC or Aerosmith to see how much heavier Crue is!

Though, ultimately, genres tend to overlap a lot anyway, and bands often play music that can fit into several genres.

Chase
06-02-2011, 07:45 PM
So droppin' band names has morphed from droppin' a final "g"? Shades of ongoing gunfights in the firearms forum.

Off on yet another tangent, one aspect of the dropped "g" is mostly invisible, except for the deaf and hard-of-hearing, who seldom argue nuances of music but who need closed captions:

"Going to" is commonly shortened to "gonna." Other "sound words" show up a lot in closed captions on TV.

However, those who lip-read can tell it makes no difference if the speaker is a street urchin or an orator in the House of Lords. It's maddening when lines from Shakespeare contain "wanna" and "hafta." Or should I write that it's maddenin'?

Curiously, subtitle writers don't take such shortcuts and tend to follow the speaker's vernacular. They even include apostrophes in place of a dropped g.

Julie Reilly
06-02-2011, 07:57 PM
If I was writing a character who spoke that way all through the book, what I might do is write it a few times with the apostrophe to denote the missing g, just long enough to establish the character's accent, then I would probably continue to write it WITH the g for ease of reading. I would never write it without the g or the apostrophe, as "spinnin".

Would that be wrong?

As a Lancashire lass, I loathe it when writers attempt to write the Northern accent, e.g. "Oop North!" It's very condescending and makes me put a book down instantly. If someone uses a different word for something, i.e. a dialect word, that's one thing - but to write out the pronunciation of a normal word is annoying.

It's like me writing "barth" for "bath" or "Grarss" for "Grass" to put across that my character speaks with a Southern accent - it's unnecessary and implies that the writer's accent is the 'correct' one.

Or maybe I'm being over-sensitive - IDK.

jdm
06-02-2011, 08:29 PM
If I was writing a character who spoke that way all through the book, what I might do is write it a few times with the apostrophe to denote the missing g, just long enough to establish the character's accent, then I would probably continue to write it WITH the g for ease of reading. I would never write it without the g or the apostrophe, as "spinnin".

Would that be wrong?



When I read, I don't have the presence of mind to consciously (or unconsciously) think "Oh, that g isn't really supposed to be in this character's speech pattern so therefore I will ignore it." I read what I see and if a character started out without his g, then suddenly it was there, I would assume it was sloppy writing or an editor's mistake. If you had a character who was undereducated and always conjugated his verbs wrong, it would seem pretty silly for him to start speaking with proper English a few sentences later in one of his dialogues. Same thing, in my opinion.

Julie Reilly
06-02-2011, 08:57 PM
Well, dropping a 'g' isn't conjugating a verb wrong.

If a character always said "them books" instead of "those books" then I would always write "them". But if it's simply a matter of pronouncing a word in a particular way, then is it necessary to write it throughout the book?

Chase
06-03-2011, 01:10 AM
Well, dropping a 'g' isn't conjugating a verb wrong.

I think conjugation was an example unrelated to contractions. Moreover, I see JDM's point about sticking with a character's speech differences throughout.

That's not to say we should Huck Finn every single word, but minor differences can keep every single character, including the narrator, from "sounding" tediously the same.

Nick Blaze
06-03-2011, 06:34 AM
I'd have to disagree. "Metal" and "heavy metal" themselves are just types of rock, and they tend to be heavier than "hard rock". You could also say that there are no metal bands, period, just different kinds of rock, but that wouldn't help very much in drawing genre boundaries (which tend to overlap as it is). Glam metal is also metal because it's heavier than hard rock, generally, but it's also distinct from other types of metal (like speed, thrash, death, etc). One need only compare Crue to traditional hard rock outfits like AC/DC or Aerosmith to see how much heavier Crue is!

Though, ultimately, genres tend to overlap a lot anyway, and bands often play music that can fit into several genres.

That would be true if metal were more like hard rock. It originated from a blues/jazz aspect more than a rock influence. Black Sabbath was the first metal band, first a blues band, then being traditional heavy metal and then moving on to doom metal. It is true that Crue sounds different than AC/DC, but if you compare them to other traditional heavy metal bands (like Slough Feg), you'll notice they have more in common with hard rock.

Speed metal technically doesn't exist; it's usually just a mix of power and thrash metal. Metal isn't about heaviness. There are plenty of metal bands that sound very "light", especially in the prog, power, and doom metal areas. Metal is about the song structure and how the guitars are employed, so if you compare, say, Blind Guardian to an AC/DC song, you would hear two almost completely different song structures and elements. You may also hear similar structures, too. For this reason, and especially with metalcore bands (in order to differentiate them from being more metal than hardcore rock) you'll notice Crue holds more in common with AC/DC and Aerosmith in song structure than with Black Sabbath.

bsymom
06-08-2011, 09:16 PM
I think it would depend on how much slang your subject is using. Sometimes your page can end up looking like a dot-to-dot.

Torgo
06-08-2011, 09:27 PM
That would be true if metal were more like hard rock. It originated from a blues/jazz aspect more than a rock influence. Black Sabbath was the first metal band, first a blues band, then being traditional heavy metal and then moving on to doom metal. It is true that Crue sounds different than AC/DC, but if you compare them to other traditional heavy metal bands (like Slough Feg), you'll notice they have more in common with hard rock.

Speed metal technically doesn't exist; it's usually just a mix of power and thrash metal. Metal isn't about heaviness. There are plenty of metal bands that sound very "light", especially in the prog, power, and doom metal areas. Metal is about the song structure and how the guitars are employed, so if you compare, say, Blind Guardian to an AC/DC song, you would hear two almost completely different song structures and elements. You may also hear similar structures, too. For this reason, and especially with metalcore bands (in order to differentiate them from being more metal than hardcore rock) you'll notice Crue holds more in common with AC/DC and Aerosmith in song structure than with Black Sabbath.

How would you categorise the Cäptäin and Tennīlle?

jdm
06-10-2011, 04:30 AM
How would you categorise the Cäptäin and Tennīlle?

Male and female. Boy did this thread go astray!

AudreyInDC
06-23-2011, 12:24 AM
So, I have a character who uses some slang, including "darlin'" with a dropped g. Of course, sometimes it's at the end of a sentence, so I'm trying to figure out the punctuation. Is it:

"What's wrong, darlin'?"
"Come here, darlin',"
"Sweet, sweet darlin'."

Or:

"What's wrong, darlin?'"
Etc etc

I think it's the first version, but I think it just looks kinda odd, either way. If I had access to my well-worn copy of Strunk and White I could probably answer this myself, but it's packed away in some far recess of the dark and dreaded closet. :tongue









Hmm, that thread title sounds oddly like a band name . . .

Important to note that a comma or period should precede the apostrophe that ends "darlin'":

"What's wrong, darlin'?"
"Come here, darlin,'"
"Sweet, sweet darlin.'"

It looks ugly here, but should look better in Times New Roman or similar font.

Torgo
06-23-2011, 12:27 AM
Important to note that a comma or period should precede the apostrophe that ends "darlin'":

"What's wrong, darlin'?"
"Come here, darlin,'"
"Sweet, sweet darlin.'"

It looks ugly here, but should look better in Times New Roman or similar font.

Eh?

I disagree!

AudreyInDC
06-23-2011, 12:31 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by AudreyInDC http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/buttons/viewpost.gif (http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?p=6276940#post6276940)
Important to note that a comma or period should precede the apostrophe that ends "darlin'":

"What's wrong, darlin'?"
"Come here, darlin,'"
"Sweet, sweet darlin.'"

It looks ugly here, but should look better in Times New Roman or similar font.

Eh?

I disagree!

You disagree? About the ugliness or the correctness? :)

Torgo
06-23-2011, 12:33 AM
About the correctness! I contend that the period or comma should go between the apostrophe and the quote marks. If you take it away from the end of 'darlin' the apostrophe loses all meaning.

AudreyInDC
06-23-2011, 12:34 AM
Eh?

I disagree!

My reasoning is that, at least in American English, commas and periods go inside of single quotes where they're used, e.g.:

"Aunt Polly said, 'Go home.'"
Or "He said, 'Go home,'" Aunt Polly explained.

So on the same principle, the apostrophe in "darlin'" should also enclose any comma/period.

Chase
06-23-2011, 12:37 AM
Important to note that a comma or period should precede the apostrophe that ends "darlin'":

"What's wrong, darlin'?"
"Come here, darlin,'"
"Sweet, sweet darlin.'"

It looks ugly here, but should look better in Times New Roman or similar font.

The second and third examples look ugly anywhere in any font; they're wrong. The problem is the apostrophe is being confused with a single end quote mark.

Correct:

"Come here, darlin'," he said.

and

"Sweet, sweet darlin'," she said.

Chase
06-23-2011, 12:39 AM
My reasoning is that, at least in American English, commas and periods go inside of single quotes where they're used, e.g.:

"Aunt Polly said, 'Go home.'"
Or "He said, 'Go home,'" Aunt Polly explained.

So on the same principle, the apostrophe in "darlin'" should also enclose any comma/period.

The samples above are correct for US publications, but the principle cited doesn't apply to apostrophes.

Torgo
06-23-2011, 12:40 AM
My reasoning is that, at least in American English, commas and periods go inside of single quotes where they're used, e.g.:

"Aunt Polly said, 'Go home.'"
Or "He said, 'Go home,'" Aunt Polly explained.

So on the same principle, the apostrophe in "darlin'" should also enclose any comma/period.

Yeah, but although it's the same character, an apostrophe is not the same thing as a single quote. They do different jobs and the only way to distinguish between them is by their position.

Ari Meermans
06-23-2011, 12:47 AM
My reasoning is that, at least in American English, commas and periods go inside of single quotes where they're used, e.g.:

"Aunt Polly said, 'Go home.'"
Or "He said, 'Go home,'" Aunt Polly explained.

So on the same principle, the apostrophe in "darlin'" should also enclose any comma/period.

Nope. The apostrophe in darlin' is replacing the 'g' and is not part of end of sentence punctuation. It denotes a dropped letter.

Fallen
06-23-2011, 12:53 AM
I think Torgo is spot on here, Audrey.

The apostrophe is being used to show that a letter has been dropped. Going v goin' and even in dialogue the apostrophe should always stay attached to the word that's missing a letter:

"He said, 'we're goin','" AP explained.

In your 'go home quote, you're quoting something someone said inside quotes: "Aunt Polly said 'go home,'" You're not missing a letter out. :)

AudreyInDC
06-23-2011, 12:58 AM
Okay, you're making me doubt my analogy here, but does anyone have an authoritative reference for that? I just tried to google and couldn't find a good answer right off the bat ...

How about with possessives? Would you write: "Whose day off was it? The fathers'." Or would you say, "Whose day off was it? The fathers.'"

AudreyInDC
06-23-2011, 12:59 AM
I think Torgo is spot on here, Audrey.

The apostrophe is being used to show that a letter has been dropped. Going v goin' and even in dialogue the apostrophe should always stay attached to the word that's missing a letter:

"He said, 'we're goin','" AP explained.

In your 'go home quote, you're quoting something someone said inside quotes: "Aunt Polly said 'go home,'" You're not missing a letter out. :)

Oh, does AP say it? I trust AP! And your example looks right ...

Torgo
06-23-2011, 01:00 AM
Okay, you're making me doubt my analogy here, but does anyone have an authoritative reference for that? I just tried to google and couldn't find a good answer right off the bat ...

How about with possessives? Would you write: "Whose day off was it? The fathers'." Or would you say, "Whose day off was it? The fathers.'"

The former. If ' is working as an apostrophe, it needs to stay on the premises.

Fallen
06-23-2011, 01:15 AM
If you had a character who was undereducated and always conjugated his verbs wrong, it would seem pretty silly for him to start speaking with proper English a few sentences later in one of his dialogues. Same thing, in my opinion.

But then that's saying that all educated people don't drop their 'g's'. Everyone who speaks language diversifies, or changes their language from context to context. You could have a college professor say to his class:

"Morphological inventiveness is a way for children to express their understanding of the world."

Then to his missus, when he's got his feet up:

"Fancy doin' us a cuppa, love?"

And vice-versa, just because some people don't have an education, it doesn't mean they don't know how and where to use language to their advantage.

Julie Reilly
06-23-2011, 01:15 AM
If the apostrophe is being used to denote a missing letter, it should be treated as if it were the letter itself for the purposes of punctuation. You would not put the missed 'g' after the comma, so therefore you also don't put the apostrophe which replaces it after the comma either.

It's the same with possessives. The apostrophe is treated as part of the word. All other punctuation comes after it.

Fallen
06-23-2011, 01:27 AM
Oh, does AP say it? I trust AP! And your example looks right ...

Lol, AP is just Aunt Polly from your example.

The best reference you'll find is any fiction on your shelf, hun, Just have a look how the punctuation is set out. Failing that, just remember what possessive mark goes with a word, stays with a word, what contracted form gets cut down by a mark, stays with that mark.

If in any doubt, write the sentence without the quote marks:

he said, we're goin', ap explained.

Then add your quotes:

"he said, 'we're goin','" ap explained.

Torgo
06-23-2011, 01:30 AM
The apostrophe is like a ruggedly-handsome bodyguard, putting himself in the line of fire for the 'g', played by R&B sensation Whitney Houston. That bodyguard would never leave his post to cower behind a period or a comma.

Oh dear, I shouldn't have had that last Grolsch.

JayMan
06-23-2011, 03:16 AM
The apostrophe is like a ruggedly-handsome bodyguard, putting himself in the line of fire for the 'g', played by R&B sensation Whitney Houston. That bodyguard would never leave his post to cower behind a period or a comma.

Oh dear, I shouldn't have had that last Grolsch.
Au contraire. You should have more. This is only the start of something wonderful.

AmsterdamAssassin
06-23-2011, 11:01 AM
It should be easy to see
The crux of the biscuit
Is the apostrophe...

Torgo
06-23-2011, 01:11 PM
Thursday: I wake up to discover that I have invented the Kevin Costner Theory of Punctuation.

AudreyInDC
06-23-2011, 10:28 PM
Nope. The apostrophe in darlin' is replacing the 'g' and is not part of end of sentence punctuation. It denotes a dropped letter.

Okay, then, since now you've all got me obsessing over the differences between apostrophes and single quotes, would your plural of "darlin'" be "darlin's"? Or would you simply drop the apostrophe there and write "darlins"?

(This whole discussion is highly theoretical for me, since I'm not likely to have a character saying "darlin'" either in the singular or the plural anytime soon ... still, it's always good to be prepared, right?)

quicklime
06-23-2011, 10:45 PM
Although I'm firmly in the "use an apostrophe" camp, does anybody know what the justification might be for not using one? I always figured it was a matter of grammar/punctuation and not style.


I think a big part would be that the apostrophe sort of denotes that the writing is incomplete or incorrect, and if you're "doin hillbilly english", especially page after page of it, all those apostrophes might not dovetail with the flow of the dialogue. It can get to be a lot of shit floatin at the top of the textline, and I thin some people drop it so it isn't taken as a quotation mark.

or they're lazy.

Julie Reilly
06-24-2011, 12:58 AM
Okay, then, since now you've all got me obsessing over the differences between apostrophes and single quotes, would your plural of "darlin'" be "darlin's"? Or would you simply drop the apostrophe there and write "darlins"?


The apostrophe replaces the 'g' so it would go where the 'g' would have gone.

So, darlings would become darlin's

The only time you don't use an apostrophe to replace a missing letter is when it is replacing two or more letters that were together, or when using one of the standardised exceptions or irregular forms.

So, forecastle on a ship becomes fo'c's'le, even though the first apostrophe replaces both the r and the e. And I was the only kid when we studied this in English aged 11 who guessed what fo'c's'le was short for :D Sometimes the last apostrophe is omitted.

Exceptions and irregular forms
"Shan't" has no apostrophe to replace to two 'l's which were in "Shall not".
"Will not" becomes "Won't"

Small children, when learning the rule, often use the form "amn't" which seems logical, but is not a standard contraction. It's cute though :)