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triceretops
10-30-2005, 06:25 AM
I need some help. I want to know what a "muse" is. Are they fantasy creations made by mankind? I can remember one called Serendipity in a movie called Dogma, but it doesn't appear as one of the ancient greek mythological goddesses. My new century dictionary lists:

Calliope, Clio, Erato, Euterpe, Melpoment, Polyhymnia, Terpsichore, Thalia, Urania--all of them are supposedly in charge of a certain character attributes, like astronomy, literary, dancing, song, poetry, etc. But it doesn't tell me which is which. Can you point me to a link on the web that would explain this?

My reason is this: I want to create a new muse (a tenth) that was supposedly left out of the original list, and use her in a new novel. I want to call her Felicitous Fortune, or Felicity, for short. She will be the muse Lady Luck, but I don't know if she is described in one of the previous nine examples!

The book will be in the tone of the script Bedazzled, if you've ever seen that movie staring Brenden F. But it will naturally veer from the plot to make it unique. Now, what in the heck genre is this? Is this what they call urban fantasy? Am I stradling a dangerous fence here? I can think of other examples where mystical or fantasy (or mythological) characters interact with the MC:

Angels in the Outfield
Damn Yankees
Manequin
Date with an Angel
Splash
City of the Angels
The Bishop's Wife
Meet Joe Black

What is the precise name for this genre? I also know that these types of ideas lend themselves better to original screenplays.

Any links on this on the web that might clear this up?

Thanks so much,

Triceratops

triceretops
10-30-2005, 10:07 AM
Whoops--apparently I made this too difficult. I just researched muses on the web, so that's taken care of.

Simple question: What genre is this? Like, if Xanadu was a book, what would you call it for marketing purposes?

Tri

mdin
10-30-2005, 12:18 PM
I would say those are all fantasy. The publisher would likely mark it fantasy, and they would put it in the fantasy section.

If you want to get specific... Amazon would call it contemporary fantasy, others here might call it urban fantasy, depending on how the story works out. Personally, I'd just stick with 'fantasy' and let the publisher worry about the specifics of the genre.

fedorable1
11-02-2005, 10:44 PM
Just FYI: There is a comic book titled "Tenth Muse," which is a fantasy/action take on that subject. Also, the ancient poet(ess) Sappho of Lesbos has also been referred to as the Tenth Muse.

It's sort of like saying the "8th Wonder of the World." I'm sure your idea is completely original, and I'm not sure exactly what you're doing, but it's something to keep in mind.

Good luck.

DaveKuzminski
11-03-2005, 12:50 AM
Why not call her the 13th muse and then let others try to figure out who the other unknown missing muses are?

veinglory
11-03-2005, 12:52 AM
I am not sure how luck is a muse. The muses inspire peaople in specific artistic endeavours. If that is not the role of this creature she doesn't seem to fit the job description?

victoriastrauss
11-03-2005, 12:56 AM
The book will be in the tone of the script Bedazzled, if you've ever seen that movie staring Brenden F.Have you seen the original Bedazzled, with Peter Cook and Dudley Moore? Much, much cleverer and more funny.

- Victoria

Richard
11-03-2005, 12:56 AM
I need some help. I want to know what a "muse" is. Are they fantasy creations made by mankind?

The classical versions were minor goddesses, kicking off with three (Melete, muse of meditation, Mneme, muse of memory, and Aoide, the muse of Song), before being upped to the nine you're talking about. To be honest, luck's not really their thing - they're primarily into the arts and associated disciplines.

The Greeks had a specific goddess for luck - Tyche, later renamed Fortuna by the Romans. She's not a muse, but that's about as close as you're going to get.

badducky
11-03-2005, 02:17 AM
Incidentally, anyone ever meet any buff fantasy buffs?


Is Vin Deisel the only one?

Sage
11-03-2005, 07:49 AM
Calliope, Clio, Erato, Euterpe, Melpoment, Polyhymnia, Terpsichore, Thalia, Urania--all of them are supposedly in charge of a certain character attributes, like astronomy, literary, dancing, song, poetry, etc. But it doesn't tell me which is which. Can you point me to a link on the web that would explain this?


Why, yes I can. Several in fact.

I'm not sure how official this info is, but I found this one had lots of info:
http://www.thanasis.com/muses.htm

www.pantheon.org (http://www.pantheon.org) has info I trust on mythological items, but often the explanations are brief. http://www.pantheon.org/areas/gallery/mythology/europe/greek/muses.html

Hmm, that link doesn't seem to be working right now, so here's what I know.

Urania - astronomy
Terpsichore - dance & music, she also was good for education
Thalia - comedy, idyllic poetry
Melpomene - tragedy
Erato - lyric poetry, especially romance & erotic
Polyhymnia - "Songs to the gods," sacred hymn & dance. She's meditative
Clio - historical & heroic poetry
Euterpe - created the double flute, "aulos." Lyric poetry & music. She's the muse of joy
Calliope - epic poetry

There's some overlap too (three of them are lyric poetry). Calliope has a big story, which I believe you have to go to Artemis's entry on pantheon.org to find, but since that site decided to go down, I can't look it up for you.

There was originally one Muse, then there were three. The three are Mneme (memory), Aoede (song), & Melete (wisdom? I can't remember)

TeddyG
11-03-2005, 12:25 PM
Isn't the movie Splash with Daryl Hannah?

droollllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllsssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss

preyer
11-04-2005, 04:22 AM
three muses, three fates, three turns at pac-man for a quarter, three, three, three (three threes, there, you see?). is three the most powerful symbolic number or what?

Richard
11-04-2005, 04:58 AM
It's up there. Pythagoras called it the 'perfect number', and it occurs throughout mythology - Fates, Furies, Graces, Norns, Christian graces, Cardinal colours...

Rabe
11-04-2005, 10:19 AM
Whoops--apparently I made this too difficult. I just researched muses on the web, so that's taken care of.

Simple question: What genre is this? Like, if Xanadu was a book, what would you call it for marketing purposes?

Tri

I'd call it extremely inferior! Mainly cause I'd not have the pleasure of being able to oogle the extremely loverly Livvy!

But I'd also definately call it Fantasy. What subgenre? Well that depends a lot, but as I read the list of the similar movies you posted, they all strike me as being general Fantasy and mostly blessedly free of a 'sub' genre.

rabe...
...so says the guy that HAS to put the 'dark' before his fantasy!