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Elaine Margarett
07-14-2009, 09:49 PM
I have a character who was born at home (actually a commune) with no medical personnel in attendence and the birth was never officially reported. What steps would this person have to take to obtain a Social Security card?

Hope someone can help~

TIA!
EM

Maryn
07-14-2009, 10:27 PM
It's going to be either difficult or impossible. From ssa.gov:Social Security Number for a U.S.-Born Citizen Age 12 or Older

To apply for a Social Security number:

* Complete an Application For A Social Security Card (Form SS-5); and
* Show us documents proving:
o U.S. citizenship;
o Age; and
o Identity.
* Take your completed application and original documents to your local Social Security office

Anyone age 12 or older requesting an original Social Security number card must appear for an interview at a Social Security office.

Citizenship

We can accept only certain documents as proof of U.S. citizenship. These include a U.S. birth certificate, U.S. consular report of birth, U.S. passport, Certificate of Naturalization or Certificate of Citizenship.

Age

You must present your birth certificate if you have it or can easily obtain it. If not, we can consider other documents, such as your passport to prove age. Social Security must verify a birth record for all U.S.-born applicants or any age who apply for an original Social Security number.

Identity

We can accept only certain documents as proof of identity. An acceptable document must be current (not expired) and show your name, identifying information (date of birth or age) and preferably a recent photograph. For example, as proof of identity Social Security must see your:

* U.S. driver’s license;
* State-issued nondriver identification card; or
* U.S. passport.

If you do not have one of these specific documents or you cannot get a replacement for one of them within 10 days, we will ask to see other documents, including:

* Employee ID card;
* School ID card;
* Health insurance card (not a Medicare card); or
* U.S. military ID card.

We may use one document for two purposes. For example, we may use your U.S. passport as proof of both citizenship and identity. However, you must provide at least two separate documents.

All documents must be either originals or copies certified by the issuing agency. We cannot accept photocopies or notarized copies of documents.

We will mail your card as soon as we have all of your information and have verified your documents.I read this to mean that step one is going to be obtaining one of the very few forms of identification and/or citizenship with the SSA will accept.

Maryn, who's replaced one kid's card

Kitty Pryde
07-14-2009, 10:41 PM
If you 'know a guy', you can get a fake one. My partner interviews lots of people at her job who end up unable to be hired because their SS card/number are faked/doctored. I'm not sure if all companies would run a check on the number like that. At her job they have to do extensive checking because she hires people to be caregivers paid by the state, so it's all official-like. Anyways, my point is that LOADS of illegal immigrants have fake SS cards.

johnnysannie
07-14-2009, 11:04 PM
I have a character who was born at home (actually a commune) with no medical personnel in attendence and the birth was never officially reported. What steps would this person have to take to obtain a Social Security card?

Hope someone can help~

TIA!
EM

My mother is a retired Social Security Claims rep. At one time, SS would take a family record (such as a Family Bible notation) if there was no other available birth record but that was primarily done only for people born before birth registration and certificates were required in all states. Now, it would be next to impossible through legal channels and probably a lot harder that it might seem through illegal ones.

jclarkdawe
07-15-2009, 03:39 AM
You start with the birth certificate, not the social security card. Each state has its own procedures, which are probably similar. Here is the statute for New Hampshire, effective 1 January 2006.

5-C:38 Application for Delayed Certificate of Birth.
I. When a birth record of a living person in the state of New Hampshire has not been filed within 6 months of birth, or 12 months if the birth occurred in a hospital, the registrant, parent, or legal guardian shall register the birth record with the clerk of the town or city in which the birth occurred.
II. The clerk of the town or city shall mark the birth record prepared under paragraph I ""Delayed.''
III. In the case of a live person allegedly born in the state of New Hampshire whose birth is not registered in a New Hampshire city or town, at the division, or in a bordering state, the registrant, or his or her parent or legal guardian, may apply for a delayed certificate of birth in writing or in person with the clerk of the city or town where his or her birth allegedly occurred by submitting: the completed form established by the division for that purpose; the documentary evidence required under this section; and the fee established by RSA 5-C:10.
IV. An application for a delayed certificate of birth shall contain the registrant's full name at birth; the registrant's date of birth; the registrant's sex; the registrant's place of birth; the registrant's city or town and county of birth; the registrant's father's full name and state or country of birth; the registrant's mother's full maiden name and state or country of birth; the signature and present address of applicant, if such person is 18 years of age or over, except that a married female applicant shall use her maiden name for signature; and the signature of a justice of the peace, or the signature and seal of a notary public, the date signed and the date his or her commission expires.
V. If the applicant is under 18 years of age, the application shall be signed and sworn to by one of the following acting on behalf of a living registrant and having personal knowledge of the facts of birth: either of the parents of the proposed registrant, cosigned by one of the grandparents if the parents are not of legal age; the legal guardian of the proposed registrant; or the legal representative having power of attorney over the proposed registrant.
VI. The applicant for delayed certificate of birth shall submit to the clerk of the town or city of birth occurrence the following documentary evidence to substantiate the name of the registrant and the date and place of birth entered on the application: at least 3 pieces of evidence as described in paragraph VIII, one of which shall be a record which was made before the first birthday of the registrant, or at least 4 pieces of evidence as described in paragraph VIII, all of which were made after the first birthday of the registrant.
VII. The facts of parentage of the registrant shall be supported by at least one of the documents in paragraph VIII other than an affidavit of personal knowledge.
VIII. Acceptable pieces of evidence to provide proof of the registrant's place and date of birth shall include but not be limited to, in order of priority:
(a) A notarized statement from the medical information department in the hospital of birth or from the clinical records where the registrant received treatments.
(b) A notarized statement from the physician, midwife, mother or father of the registrant.
(c) A baptismal certificate of the registrant.
(d) Elementary school records from the school district or equivalent stating the date and place of birth of the registrant and the name of at least one parent.
(e) A census report from the United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.
(f) The marriage record of the registrant stating the date and place of birth.
(g) A notarized affidavit of personal knowledge from the applicant or others attesting to the facts of the registrant's birth, limited to one per application.
(h) Birth records of siblings whose births surrounded that of the registrant.
(i) Insurance policies indicating the registrant's birth.
(j) Family bible records.
IX. An affidavit of personal knowledge, as described in paragraph VIII, shall be prepared by any person who has signed the affidavit before a notary public or a justice of the peace; is at least 10 years older than the applicant; is at least 18 years old; has personal knowledge of the facts of birth; and states in the affidavit why he or she knows and remembers the date of birth and states his or her relationship to the proposed registrant.
X. If the city or town of alleged birth borders on a neighboring state, the applicant shall provide a ""no record'' statement from the neighboring state, acknowledging that the birth record in question is not on file with that state. It shall not be considered a piece of evidence or part of the minimum documentation required under this section.Have fun.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

Nivarion
07-15-2009, 07:00 AM
We went through this with our aunt. They had to get a lot of witnesses who saw her born. I was still pretty little but I remember that it took many many months. I'll ask my mom about it.

ideagirl
07-16-2009, 06:09 AM
I have a character who was born at home (actually a commune) with no medical personnel in attendence and the birth was never officially reported. What steps would this person have to take to obtain a Social Security card?

Hope someone can help~

TIA!
EM

Step one is to, belatedly, officially report the birth. Then, step two, get a social security card.

Reporting the birth years or decades later will be a major hassle but is not impossible. Lawyers will be involved, and perhaps an actual judicial process (complete with judge). I would guess that you would need some witnesses, esp. one or both parents. If you want specifics, head down to the local courthouse or wherever birth certificates are recorded in your town and ask someone there what would need to be done to accomplish that. Explain that you're a writer, and have a notebook for taking notes, so they don't think you're some kind of con artist. Keep asking until someone gives you a sensible-sounding answer.

vixey
07-16-2009, 06:14 AM
Jim makes a good point...birth certificate first and getting that it depends on the state where your character was born.

vixey
07-16-2009, 06:19 AM
Found this website (http://www.homebirth-usa.org/baby/birth-cert.html) about at-home births and birth certificates in different states.

Good luck!

Tsu Dho Nimh
07-16-2009, 07:30 PM
I have a character who was born at home (actually a commune) with no medical personnel in attendence and the birth was never officially reported. What steps would this person have to take to obtain a Social Security card?

What era?

Rules have changed over time.

Barb D
07-16-2009, 08:41 PM
Here's another thread about a similar issue:

http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=130579

Elaine Margarett
07-22-2009, 12:41 AM
Thanks for all the great info. I can bend this to fit my story now that I know the gereral facts.

EM,
on the move~