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ccarver30
12-14-2008, 11:39 PM
What I mean by that is, I have come to the realization that all four of my WIPs are at a standstill because I am at the crucial section. I am at the climax and have stopped. I can't get over the hump because this is the "hard" part. (Sorry for all the seemingly sex references!)

Does anyone else have this problem!?!? :(

ChaosTitan
12-15-2008, 12:11 AM
My stall usually comes around page 100. By the time I get to the climax, I have a pretty clear idea of where the story's going, so I rarely have a problem getting there.

Probably not helpful. :)

Palmfrond
12-15-2008, 12:14 AM
Come on ccarver30, put your butt in the chair and just do it. It's never right the first time, but editing is sooo much easier than writing it the first time. You know what's going to happen; just blast through it and fix it later. Go, go, go.

Maryn
12-15-2008, 12:15 AM
Not really a problem I have--since I started having a fairly detailed plan in place before I began something as intricate as a novel.

I only write and see where it takes me with short stories.

I'm curious, do you have an outline or other blueprint and this still happens, or is the problem that you're not sure where you go from here (whether or not you know the ending)?

Maryn, nosy

ccarver30
12-15-2008, 12:25 AM
Maryn- I love your polar bear avatar. :)
NO, I do not outline. Mayhap this is my problem. I know what the climax IS, but I don't know how to get through it. Palmy is right. I think I just need to charge my way through it and if I hate it I can fix it later. I can't beleive I did this same thing will all of my WIPs. I feel weak. :p

Gillhoughly
12-15-2008, 12:33 AM
Lots of writers stall out in the "great swampy middle' as Jim Butcher calls it.

You can second-guess and excuse yourself into giving up and starting a FIFTH WIP---which will also probably stall out...

Or suck down some caffeine, put on your game face, and plow through to the end.

Siddown and get ONE of them finished.

Even if you hate it, the danged thing is FINISHED.

You will have accomplished something amazing.

Later you can totally polish it into publishable brilliance, but for now, slog your stubborn way out of the swamp.

ccarver30
12-15-2008, 12:47 AM
Lots of writers stall out in the "great swampy middle' as Jim Butcher calls it.

You can second-guess and excuse yourself into giving up and starting a FIFTH WIP---which will also probably stall out...

Or suck down some caffeine, put on your game face, and plow through to the end.

Siddown and get ONE of them finished.

Even if you hate it, the danged thing is FINISHED.

You will have accomplished something amazing.

Later you can totally polish it into publishable brilliance, but for now, slog your stubborn way out of the swamp.

Thank you. You are right about the 5th WIP theory; this is why I am glad I figured this out now. LOL

RJK
12-15-2008, 12:51 AM
Your protag must make a decision. Does he turn right or left? Does he make the call or not? Does he say yes or no? It all comes down to one decision at a time, and how that decision affects the future.

ccarver30
12-15-2008, 01:11 AM
Your protag must make a decision. Does he turn right or left? Does he make the call or not? Does he say yes or no? It all comes down to one decision at a time, and how that decision affects the future.

It's more like I know what is going to happen, I just need to write it. I think maybe I am stalling finishing for some reason...

roncouch
12-15-2008, 01:19 AM
Fear not, CC! You'll be fine. I completed my first two manuscripts with few problems. The situation I now face is, after 26k words, I've realized my 3rd manuscript sucks. Back to the drawing board.

ccarver30
12-15-2008, 01:23 AM
I am revamping my 1st novel (Stone and Glass). I am almost done at 72k and did the same thing. I am at the most critical point and I stopped writing. I need to punch myself in the face or something!!

http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u117/moontower07/ohnoz.gif

Hummingbird
12-15-2008, 02:13 AM
I am revamping my 1st novel (Stone and Glass). I am almost done at 72k and did the same thing. I am at the most critical point and I stopped writing. I need to punch myself in the face or something!!

http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u117/moontower07/ohnoz.gif

First off: I love that animation! XD

Ahem.. anyway ;) I hate it when I get stuck somewhere and it feels like I can't go anywhere in my novel even though the characters are already a step ahead of me. Everything is set up - they are just waiting for me. I agree with what everyone said with slogging through :)

Whenever I get to critical points I try to keep writing as long as possible. I'm in the groove and if I leave it could be a bit before I can return again. Of course that is when the dog needs to go outside or something. X_x

Good luck with your slogging! ;)

NeuroFizz
12-15-2008, 02:18 AM
cc, Just as Gil said upstream, pick one of your stories and push on through. Do not move on to the others until you have that one done. Then pick a second one and push through that one until done. Keep going.

To everyone else, do this long before you have two or more half-finished stories. Finish what you start.

Stunted
12-15-2008, 02:31 AM
Not to rock the boat or anything, but I actually disagree with people. When I try to just sit down and write, it often doesn't work. When I feel this kind of hang up you're describing, it often means that my plan for the scene is wrong. Maybe you should sit down with a journal or someone you know and just rant about what you need to accomplish in this scene, what the characters are feeling, which things are absolutely essential and which can be changed. Whatever. And even if it turns out that I'm wrong, and what you had planned was perfect, this exersize'll get you more in the right state of mind.

Good luck!

ccarver30
12-15-2008, 02:49 AM
Stunted - I think you might be right. Why else would I just stop? Maybe it just isn't "right" so I am taking time to rethink the scene that is of the utmost importance. Hmm... I think this is true for WIP 1 and 2 for sure. The scenes I am on are difficult. I need to stop being such a wimp. (I stopped on 3 because 4 felt the need to be written. LOL)

Don
12-15-2008, 02:53 AM
Stunted - I think you might be right. Why else would I just stop? Maybe it just isn't "right" so I am taking time to rethink the scene that is of the utmost importance. Hmm... I think this is true for WIP 1 and 2 for sure. The scenes I am on are difficult. I need to stop being such a wimp. (I stopped on 3 because 4 felt the need to be written. LOL)
I got stuck for three days on my current WIP recently. I was refusing to recognize that I had to kill off one of my major characters to advance the plot. Once I came to terms with the issue, the block disappeared. My guess is that something is telling you to rethink an important issue.

Willowmound
12-15-2008, 02:53 AM
Maybe you have a fear of failure? If you never finish anything, it can't be rejected, right?

The Lonely One
12-15-2008, 02:55 AM
Also, sometimes when you take yourself out of "the zone" and begin to question your motives with the story, it becomes very difficult to place yourself back into the flow of the story. Maybe you've second-guessed the climax's strength in your stories, thus taking you out of the necessary frame of mind to write them. Doubt yourself and not only will you not walk on water, you'll fall into the waves...or, some other such biblical parable :).

Best of luck with it. I haven't quite figured out the remedy to such a problem, other than to ignore your monkey brain (analytical conscious) and talk to the lizard brain (creative subconscious) as often as possible.

ccarver30
12-15-2008, 03:02 AM
Maybe you have a fear of failure? If you never finish anything, it can't be rejected, right?

Yes x 438920423092.7

Willowmound
12-15-2008, 03:07 AM
Once you make yourself finish one thing, the rest come easier. Somewhat.

Maryn
12-15-2008, 03:29 AM
I'm sorry, were you all saying something? I was checking out Jared...

ccarver30
12-15-2008, 03:31 AM
**giggles** I have 125 pics of him on my computer. :D

NeuroFizz
12-15-2008, 10:36 AM
Not to rock the boat or anything, but I actually disagree with people. When I try to just sit down and write, it often doesn't work. When I feel this kind of hang up you're describing, it often means that my plan for the scene is wrong. Maybe you should sit down with a journal or someone you know and just rant about what you need to accomplish in this scene, what the characters are feeling, which things are absolutely essential and which can be changed. Whatever. And even if it turns out that I'm wrong, and what you had planned was perfect, this exersize'll get you more in the right state of mind.

Good luck!
You are not disagreeing, in my mind. This is one good way to deal with a stuck scene. It's something every writer faces. But the danger is in jumping to another project every time this happens, which is the best way to never finish anything. What you are suggesting is to stick with the scene and the story, and that is exactly what several of us are saying as well. Sometimes we can bull-rush our way through a stuck scene. Sometimes it takes a few 30-minute hot showers. Sometimes it takes some serious time to consider alternate approaches, and some venting or doodling to work it out. And frequently, there is the eureka moment when a solution comes and the scene takes flight.

tehuti88
12-15-2008, 07:27 PM
I'm stalling and dawdling before the climax--for me, that's the hardest part of the story, the late-middle section BEFORE the big moment. So, I kind of know the feeling. There's this fear of messing the important stuff up, of rushing everything toward the end when chances are more likely I'm dragging my feet!

The only way around it that I know of is to just quit dragging one's feet and write. *shrug* As hard as it might be. Problems can always be fixed later. And yes, I need to take my own advice. Admitting you have a problem is the first step! :o

Phaeal
12-15-2008, 07:28 PM
Sounds like classic climax anxiety -- how can it ever be good enough? And once I've finished the novel, don't I have to finally face the fact that it finally fails to meet the brilliant expectations I had at the start?

Accept that it will fall short. Speed-write an outline for the climax. Then write it, take a break, and go back for a second draft.

My favorite tip on climaxes: Don't cut them too short. This is the big payoff to the reader -- give him time to savor it.

scarletpeaches
12-15-2008, 07:41 PM
**giggles** I have 423 pics of him on my computer. :D

Then we needs to email each other, sister. :D

Srsly.

Aaaaanyhoo.

I don't outline either, and it's not that I have no confidence in my ability to finish. Every since my first WIP, way back fifteen years ago, I've never, not for a single moment, doubted my ability to get to 'The End'.

I think it's a fear of rejection so something holds me back from finishing...because if I never finish, I can't be rejected, right?

But then if I don't risk rejection, neither will I taste success.

Or Jared.

So. How's about swapping us some manprawn?

I know - for every 500 words you write, I send you another photo of Jared! :D

NeuroFizz
12-15-2008, 08:09 PM
Sounds like classic climax anxiety
The worst I ever had was wonderful...

Dale Emery
12-15-2008, 11:47 PM
I am at the climax and have stopped. I can't get over the hump because this is the "hard" part.

I don't understand. How does "this is the 'hard' part" stop you?

Dale

ccarver30
12-16-2008, 04:30 AM
So, I wrote most of the scene and realized that it was not what I wanted and am going to explore a different avenue tonight. :) Thanks for all the advice, everyone!

ccarver30
12-16-2008, 04:32 AM
I don't understand. How does "this is the 'hard' part" stop you?

Dale

Because this makes or breaks the story.

scarletpeaches
12-16-2008, 04:32 AM
The brutal, honest truth is you'll never know until you write through the wall.

Plus, where's mah damn Jaredprawn, biatch?!

ccarver30
12-16-2008, 04:44 AM
Sent!!! Jeez!

Dale Emery
12-16-2008, 05:44 AM
Because this makes or breaks the story.

There's still a piece missing. How does "this makes or breaks the story" stop you from writing it?

I have similar blocks in my own (unconscious) thinking. There's a part of me that thinks trying and failing is somehow worse than not trying. It translates small "failures" into more general failures. And that part of me is more likely to show up for things that relate to my self-image, such as consulting or writing. If I don't get this story right (on the first draft), then I "can't be a writer." If I don't land this client (on the first phone call), then I "can't be a consultant."

That logic is twisted enough, but then I warp it even more: So if I don't try, I'll never find out that I can't. So I'll be able to tell myself that I could do it if I tried.

That's a lot of meaning and self-esteem to stuff into one phone call or one story or one scene. The more I've tied my self-image to some outcome, the more reluctant I am to take the risk.

These days, if I notice that I'm using goofy logic like that (which I do all the time), I can usually unravel it. The trick is to notice that the goofy part of me wants something good for me: It wants me to be able to see myself as a writer. Once that's out in the open, it's usually pretty clear that in order to be a wrier, I'm going to have to write. And the warped part of me usually readily agrees... at least for the moment (which is usually enough).

Dale

ccarver30
12-16-2008, 06:04 AM
Thanks, Dale. It helps knowing that there are others that can get through it. :)
I am rewriting the scene now and if I don't like this 2nd attempt, then I will move on to number 3 until I get it "right"!

maestrowork
12-16-2008, 09:56 AM
I tend to stall around mid-book, right smack in the middle of it (when I stalled with TPB, it was around 50K mark. I've been moving slowly from 65K-80K with book 2).

Part of it is the mid-book blues, and part of it, as I look back on how I wrote the first book, really is about movement. Plot, character, motivation, etc. I got stuck for a while because the plot didn't really move or the dramatic tension was gone. When I read the book again I noticed how the middle just kind of sagged (and my readers noticed that, too).

The bad news is, it sucks. The good news is, it's not the end of the world. In fact, it's good in that I dislodged so much after the mid-book constipation that the rest just flowed (it took me only four months to write the rest of TPB, and it was the strongest part of the book). So I'm hopefully that once I got through the current hump, the rest will flow again (I already had the ending written and I'm very eager to "get there" from where I am now).

It's also good to know that I'm not the only one. Many writers, seasoned, best-selling authors included, have the mid-book blues or slush. I've seen in some of the best-written, best-selling classics, when the middle just sagged. Deep now I know it doesn't mean the writer is crap -- everyone goes through similar things one time or another. So that eases my mind and I don't feel too bad about it.

I really think everyone has their process and if you find that you just can't BIC and make it work, then don't. Take a break, think it through, go to Disneyland or whatever. But don't give up -- keep working through it. Sometimes it really does mean something is not quite right (or something is just too SCARY to do or some place is too scary to go -- and you just need time). But once you find that "moment" again, I bet the rest will just flow. That happened to me -- once I found my groove again, I couldn't be stopped.

Right now, I have found my "eureka moment" but I'm still, in my mind, not ready to move forward yet. The rest of the book is so rich that I guess I'm a bit intimidated by the scale -- and failure. I'm a bit afraid that I'll fail to deliver. So I do think I need a bit time to let that settle, but I have a feeling that once I find that groove, nothing will be able to stop me from getting to the finish line.

Seriously, writing is a process, a journey. Some people plow through it with discipline and a great routine. Some people simply have to "feel it." I'm mostly the latter with a bit discipline thrown in. I try to write every day; sometimes I write 100 words, and sometimes I write 3000. I try not to set up any expectation or requirement. Writing, to me, is supposed to be fun, and I would never want to feel like it's a chore. But that's me.

Knowing myself and my process helps to get that edge off and keep the pressure soft. But I keep working on it, because I know, from previous experience, that soon the dam will break. I can almost feel it.

maestrowork
12-16-2008, 10:00 AM
There's still a piece missing. How does "this makes or breaks the story" stop you from writing it?

Speaking for myself, I think it's a "fear of failure." When something is pivotal, complex, huge, whatever you want to call it -- make or break the story -- there's a lot of pressure to make it right. The stakes for the writer is just as big as the stakes for the characters. It becomes intimidating, and the fear of failure looms large.

I know. I've been there, and I'm current there now. I know EXACTLY how the story should go and I got goosebumps thinking about it, but the dread of not delivering, not up to the task, and disappointing myself and my readers could be very incapacitating.

For me, sometimes it's about making the right choice. Being the person I am, sometimes I'm not sure if the choices I make are the right one -- at least dramatically. Like a road trip, if you make a wrong turn, sometimes it will take you forever to get back on track. Worst, it could ruin the whole trip and you will have to start over. I think that kind of fear is real, even if one can overcome it.

I think it's easy for others to say, "Just write it. Who cares if it's crap? You can fix it later." But in reality it's not that simple, because sometimes if you screw up, it screws up the entire piece and -- yes, you can start over again -- but the weight for "failure" can be hard to bear. And what if you don't even know it doesn't work? And it could be a disaster to find out much, much later when you betas tell you it doesn't work and you have to scrap the whole second half of the book, etc.

So yeah, definitely fear is at play here.

Use Her Name
12-16-2008, 10:29 AM
I've had a similar problem. I got all the way up to the huge turning point, and didn't know how to proceed. I think I remember some advice-- I do not know who wrote it-- but it seems worthwhile-- and that is to begin the book over again, starting from that point. I suppose you Ignore the fact that you have written anything. At this point, you need to find your new "Hook" start with your new exciting beginning-- pretty much start the book over again from that midway point. Well, maybe it works. You wouldnt want to do all the intros over again.

Ciera_
12-16-2008, 10:40 AM
I have the same problem! though I don't struggle specifically during the climax...
Book 1 is completed but I can't seem to get started with revision =( *dread*
Book 2 is half done, but, well, how the hell am I supposed to know what a priest would say in that situation? Geez...
Book 3 is...who am I kidding, I still can't sink the friggin' boat, so there IS no book 3.
*grumble grumble*
Looks like the holidays will hold a few BIC days for me. Until then, I'm relaxing and taking a break from it ALL.
Good luck! ='/

OctoberRain
12-16-2008, 12:24 PM
I stalled before the climax of my current WIP and spent days trying to figure out why I couldn't write an ending that would work. And then I realized that it was because there were too many holes in the first 300 pages. When I went back and really looked over everything - my chapter summaries, my notes - I saw huge, gaping errors. I had to rework the entire novel, changing POVs, beefing up my protagonist's internal conflict, getting rid of sub-plots that went nowhere (I don't outline), and once I did that, the ending was clear to me. It's not perfect, but I think with revision it will get stronger.

Hillgate
12-16-2008, 02:25 PM
The critical hump is an excellent way of expressing the part of your work that defines what it's really about: ie 'did I write all that just to get to this point?' 'Is that what my story's all about?' 'Does that mean it's rubbish? Or brilliant?' 'Is it derivative?'

The critical hump means your story actually has to go somewhere that's interesting, novel, exciting, disturbing but most of all fitting, in that it has to dovetail with all of the previous words you've crammed into your manuscript, and rams you towards your conclusion.

I like to write out one-page synopses of my work as I go along, pretending that my agent is asking for them (she doesn't until it's all finished normally). The synopses change each time, sometimes radically, sometimes, not, but the change is often at the critical hump stage. I find them a quick and excellent way of refining in my head and on paper whether or not a story is interesting enough to be told, and how it would appeal to readers.

The critical hump is key, although I know there are many writers who end up as dromedaries. :)

NeuroFizz
12-16-2008, 05:44 PM
About the critical hump thing (which I agree is a good phrase to describe it), the "make or break" aspect of it isn't in the first draft. It's in the editing of subsequent drafts. So, press on through and finish it so you can read the whole story through in its entirety. Weaknesses as well as strengths will jump out. The weaknesses are magnified when one is in the middle of them (in the first draft). From that POV, it may seem like the risk is too great. But on reading the entire first draft, what seemed like an ocean of a problem may turn out to be a mud puddle, and you just may be wearing a disposable cape...

alyssalynne
12-16-2008, 07:31 PM
I came to this point on my current WIP around 30K words. I wasn't sure if I could keep the momentum going throughout the long middle section of the story. I decided to move a big, crucial event that was supposed to happen at the end of act two, right into the middle of the story. With a few minor changes to the plot, it worked out perfectly and made the rest of act two even better.

Shadow_Ferret
12-16-2008, 07:51 PM
Ialways stalled out after chapter 4. Mostly because none of them were very well thought out. I finally broke through when I had an epiphany on one and saw all the problems that were causing my sticking point. I restarted the whole shebang and ended up finishing it at 195k. Granted, it's trunked now because of other problems, but I finished it and that sort of broke the dam and I've finished a couple others since.I'm sorry, were you all saying something? I was checking out Jared...
Huh? The guy from the Subway commercials?

Namatu
12-16-2008, 07:53 PM
With my last WIP, I had no problem with the climax. It was the aftermath. It felt like the worst dreck I could possibly write.

Sit down, hammer something out like you're doing, and keep hammering at it until it's all shiny and pretty.

Dave.C.Robinson
12-16-2008, 08:11 PM
I've been stuck at a similar hump too: for me it occurs when I know where I'm going (a future scene) but not how to get there. Usually the problem is that I don't fully understand what the scene that's blocking me is trying to do, whether for character or plot.

What works for me is to space down a couple of lines, then put a line of asterisks across the page for a break and start in on the scene I do have a feeling for. After that I go back and fill in the gap. What usually happens is when I write the other scene it determines what had to have happened in the intervening scene and then I know what to do.

I've tried bulling through and it doesn't always work: that's why I recommend trying skip ahead and backfill to see if that works for you.

Dave Veri
12-16-2008, 11:44 PM
What I mean by that is, I have come to the realization that all four of my WIPs are at a standstill because I am at the crucial section. I am at the climax and have stopped. I can't get over the hump because this is the "hard" part. (Sorry for all the seemingly sex references!)

Does anyone else have this problem!?!? :(


A few points:

1. My characters have the courage to work through things only when I have the courage to work it through.
2. By “courage” I mean the willingness to keep writing through the block every day I can. I don’t have to make the word count increase every day, but I DO keep writing. I let whatever come out, come out: I practice trusting the process. I keep a journal about every novel and write in there when I feel a little stuck. Then the writing is not pressured by its inclusion in the text itself. I just free-write about it, about myself, about my ambitions for the novel, whatever. Often the answer for the novel turns up there.
3. I except for myself that writing novels is really hard work sometimes; that’s how it works when I create my best stuff. I pretend the hard part will turn out to be the best writing, because it often is.
4. I imagine in the future seeing the book on the shelves of the bookstore, and I imagine tapping the pocket which holds the large advance check I’d received.

Good luck,
Dave

ccarver30
12-17-2008, 06:45 AM
Thank you everyone! :D

I rewrote my scene last night and am much happier with it. It is the "day after" and now I feel like I can really move on. Thanks so much for the advice, support and love!

Nico

ccarver30
12-17-2008, 06:46 AM
Huh? The guy from the Subway commercials?

<<<<<< him ;)

Nefertiti Baker
12-17-2008, 11:23 AM
There's still a piece missing. How does "this makes or breaks the story" stop you from writing it?

I have similar blocks in my own (unconscious) thinking. There's a part of me that thinks trying and failing is somehow worse than not trying. It translates small "failures" into more general failures. And that part of me is more likely to show up for things that relate to my self-image, such as consulting or writing. If I don't get this story right (on the first draft), then I "can't be a writer." If I don't land this client (on the first phone call), then I "can't be a consultant."

That logic is twisted enough, but then I warp it even more: So if I don't try, I'll never find out that I can't. So I'll be able to tell myself that I could do it if I tried.

That's a lot of meaning and self-esteem to stuff into one phone call or one story or one scene. The more I've tied my self-image to some outcome, the more reluctant I am to take the risk.

These days, if I notice that I'm using goofy logic like that (which I do all the time), I can usually unravel it. The trick is to notice that the goofy part of me wants something good for me: It wants me to be able to see myself as a writer. Once that's out in the open, it's usually pretty clear that in order to be a wrier, I'm going to have to write. And the warped part of me usually readily agrees... at least for the moment (which is usually enough).

Dale

Thank you for this kick in the patootie. I have a book to work on tomorrow...it deserves better from me.

Jake Barnes
12-17-2008, 09:50 PM
I don't know how much of the mid-book problem is due to books needing to be longer to find a publisher. Back in the Sixties, the Seventies, the Eighties, 50,000 words or 300 printed pages was a perfectly appropriate length for a novel, whether a "serious" novel like RABBIT RUN or PORTNOY'S COMPLAINT or genre fiction like the James Bond novels or the Lew Archer novels or the Travis McGee novels. Now, it seems like all novels have to be 375+ pages.

Stunted
12-18-2008, 08:29 AM
I'm sort of having this problem now. :(

ccarver30
12-21-2008, 03:40 AM
DOH. Sorry Stunted. Make sure to read all the great advice in this thread again! ;)

Prawn
12-21-2008, 04:57 AM
This has happened to me every time. My solution: jump to the end, and write that first. When I return, the hump in the middle doesn't seem so hard anymore.

ccarver30
12-21-2008, 10:26 AM
The irony of this entire thread is that it was actually a sex scene. :)

maestrowork
12-21-2008, 11:32 AM
Ah, now it all makes sense. ;)

TnD
12-21-2008, 01:40 PM
Maryn- I love your polar bear avatar. :)
NO, I do not outline. Mayhap this is my problem. I know what the climax IS, but I don't know how to get through it. Palmy is right. I think I just need to charge my way through it and if I hate it I can fix it later. I can't beleive I did this same thing will all of my WIPs. I feel weak. :p

That's the easiest thing to do. Just duck your head and push through. If it takes a couple of beers to get through your climax and over the hump, then do it. As long as you can read the drunken typing, you'll be fine. It's worked for me in the past.

Seriously, however, an outline can help you through that. If only giving you a nudge about where to go with your story. Hope this helps.

ccarver30
12-21-2008, 10:29 PM
Ah, now it all makes sense. ;)

*giggles*

scarletpeaches
12-22-2008, 06:19 AM
The irony of this entire thread is that it was actually a sex scene. :)

Oh, I'm feeling that.

Metaphorically, of course.;)

ccarver30
12-22-2008, 06:33 AM
I bet.
Did you get my email? :)

scarletpeaches
12-22-2008, 06:38 AM
Aye. :D

ccarver30
12-22-2008, 06:43 AM
****sigh**** <3

ccarver30
01-16-2009, 01:41 AM
I am bumping this to let you all know that I actually completed the story which was causing me problems and have moved to my first love, Stone and Glass to finish that one too.

Also, there is someone asking about 1/2 written/unfinished stories... Maybe this can help...?