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Thread: What is the plural of Thomas?

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  1. #1
    practical experience, FTW The Second Moon's Avatar
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    What is the plural of Thomas?

    In a story I'm writing, The MC and his adult figure, Mr. Thomas, meet a hive mind of Mr. Thomas' (?)

    How do I refer to this hive mind? Here is an example sentence that I made up on the spot.:

    The Mr. Thomas' spoke.

    Or would it be

    The Mr. Thomas's spoke.

    Thanks in advance for your help.


    Barney and Mr. Thomas = (8/8) stories finished {In the process of being beta read}

    Barney, Mr. Thomas, and the Alligator Creature = (3/8) stories finished {on the 1st draft now}


    Apocalypse Stoppers = {first draft}

  2. #2
    fighting evil by monitorlight lilyWhite's Avatar
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    You'd use "-es" (Mr. Thomases) since Mr. Thomas ends with an s. Apostrophes aren't used to make proper names plurals.

  3. #3
    practical experience, FTW The Second Moon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lilyWhite View Post
    You'd use "-es" (Mr. Thomases) since Mr. Thomas ends with an s. Apostrophes aren't used to make proper names plurals.
    Thank you!


    Barney and Mr. Thomas = (8/8) stories finished {In the process of being beta read}

    Barney, Mr. Thomas, and the Alligator Creature = (3/8) stories finished {on the 1st draft now}


    Apocalypse Stoppers = {first draft}

  4. #4
    practical experience, FTW
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    Hmm, something's nagging at me . . . I believe it might be . . . the Messrs. Thomas spoke.

    Off the top of my head, it seems a bit formal yet correct--especially if the Thomases in question are related.

    The only cite I can find is CMOS, 16th Ed., 10.16, p.493.

  5. #5
    Heckuva good sport frimble3's Avatar
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    I would lean toward 'The Thomases', saving the 'Mr.' for Barney's particular Thomas, as a gesture of respect. Like calling your mother's best friend 'Auntie', even if she isn't family.

  6. #6
    practical experience, FTW neandermagnon's Avatar
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    I would find "The Mr Thomases" much truer to a child character's voice than "The Thomases". And even if there is a plural form of Mr, I don't think the child character would know it.

    I don't know how it is in USA schools but in UK schools teachers are known by their title and last name, so every teacher I ever had at school was Mr, Mrs, Miss, etc (last name) and the title was mentally processed as part of their name, not a title of respect. Also, Sir is used as well, again like it's the teacher's name. I've even heard of cases of students swearing at teachers and still addressing them as "Sir" in the same sentence, like their actual name is Sir, the kid hasn't processed that Sir is a title of respect and not a given name, and also hasn't noticed the irony of calling someone Sir and a string of expletives in the same sentence. Teachers find this hilarious (after dealing with the insolence appropriately).

    Anyway, The Mr Thomases seems to me the most appropriate way to refer to the hive mind given a child POV.
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  7. #7
    Beastly Fido Roxxsmom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Second Moon View Post
    In a story I'm writing, The MC and his adult figure, Mr. Thomas, meet a hive mind of Mr. Thomas' (?)

    How do I refer to this hive mind? Here is an example sentence that I made up on the spot.:

    The Mr. Thomas' spoke.

    Or would it be

    The Mr. Thomas's spoke.

    Thanks in advance for your help.
    I'd probably write "The Thomases."

    Apostrophes would denote possession, not plurals.
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  8. #8
    practical experience, FTW The Second Moon's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone. The hive mind only shows up for a very brief amount of time in the short story, but I just couldn't figure out what the plural was.T Thanks again


    Barney and Mr. Thomas = (8/8) stories finished {In the process of being beta read}

    Barney, Mr. Thomas, and the Alligator Creature = (3/8) stories finished {on the 1st draft now}


    Apocalypse Stoppers = {first draft}

  9. #9
    practical experience, FTW The Second Moon's Avatar
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    I would find "The Mr Thomases" much truer to a child character's voice than "The Thomases". And even if there is a plural form of Mr, I don't think the child character would know it.
    I thought the same way. I called them the Mr. Thomases.


    Barney and Mr. Thomas = (8/8) stories finished {In the process of being beta read}

    Barney, Mr. Thomas, and the Alligator Creature = (3/8) stories finished {on the 1st draft now}


    Apocalypse Stoppers = {first draft}

  10. #10
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Second Moon View Post
    I thought the same way. I called them the Mr. Thomases.
    Maybe try Misters Thomas.

    You'll probably hate it as much as I do.
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  11. #11
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Second Moon View Post
    In a story I'm writing, The MC and his adult figure, Mr. Thomas, meet a hive mind of Mr. Thomas' (?)

    How do I refer to this hive mind? Here is an example sentence that I made up on the spot.:

    The Mr. Thomas' spoke.

    Or would it be

    The Mr. Thomas's spoke.

    Thanks in advance for your help.
    How about:

    Mr. Wholemes' spoke. Like in, 'a whole mass of something'--though you'd need to introduce who these particular fellows is of One are.

  12. #12
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    Bus:buses :: Thomas:Thomases.

  13. #13
    New Fish; Learning About Thick Skin
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Second Moon View Post
    In a story I'm writing, The MC and his adult figure, Mr. Thomas, meet a hive mind of Mr. Thomas' (?)

    How do I refer to this hive mind? Here is an example sentence that I made up on the spot.:

    The Mr. Thomas' spoke.

    Or would it be

    The Mr. Thomas's spoke.

    Thanks in advance for your help.
    Messy. Try Smith. Or Brown. Not Jones.
    David Makinson

    Author of Invincible, Volume 1 of the Tanner Archives Invincible

    Principal & Founder, Sharpedge Editing Sharpedge Editing

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    A writer is a person for whom writing is more difficult than it is for other people.
    Thomas Mann

  14. #14
    never mind the shorty angeliz2k's Avatar
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    If you wanna get technical/fancy, you can use messieurs (abbreviated Messrs.; Messrs. Thomas).

    But it would be the Misters Thomas or the Thomases.

    For a kid, I suspect he might just say "Mr. Thomas and Mr. Thomas" or "the Mr. Thomasas". Are the two Thomases related? Maybe "the Thomas brothers/cousins/whatever" if he's talking about them but not to them.
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