Quote Originally Posted by Roxxsmom View Post
There are different ways to approach this, and it's largely a matter of style preferences. The way you did it in the last example makes it look like the teacher is burping, however. You need to attribute the belch in some way.

If I wanted to emphasize that a spoken sentence was interrupted midway, I'd probably do it like this:

The teacher said, "In today's lesson, we are"--someone in the second row burped with the gusto and volume only a teenage boy can manage without vomiting--"going to study ancient history."

You could also write:

The teacher said, "In today's lesson, we are"--Buuuuurrrrp, went Brad--"going to study ancient history."

You could also write something like:

The teacher began, "In today's lesson, we are--"

One of the students burped loudly, but the teacher continued without missing a beat, "going to study ancient history."

Or you could write,

Ignoring a loud belch from the second row, the teacher said, "In today's lesson, we are going to study ancient history."
Hi Roxxsmom,

That is very helpful. Thanks!

It is a relatively fast paced scene, so I think this example would work nicely for my needs: The teacher said, "In today's lesson, we are"--Buuuuurrrrp, went Brad--"going to study ancient history."

-If it is a sound which is heard over and over again, and from which we are certain of the source, could I eliminate the "went Brad" part? To read as: The teacher said, "In today's lesson, we are"--Buuuuurrrrp--"going to study ancient history."

-Also is it typical convention to use the -- outside the quotes when someone is being interrupted?

Thank you for your time!
Juggernaut