Writer's Literary Screenplay Agency, Screenplay Writers' Agency,The Screenplay Agency

rudythewriter

Screenplay Agency

My "acceptance" e-mail from the Screenplay Agency -
Our review team believes that your Book-To-Film Adaptation has commercial
potential and we would like to proceed further with you. We believe we would
like to represent you....however.....
The Coverage Report usually takes the editor 1-2 hours and is $95... The
Pitch sheet takes about three hours of the editors time and is $189. If you
request them both at the same time, the total cost is discounted to $245.
PLEASE NOTE: WE ARE NOT ASKING FOR MONEY.
 

Roger J Carlson

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rudythewriter said:
My "acceptance" e-mail from the Screenplay Agency -
Our review team believes that your Book-To-Film Adaptation has commercial
potential and we would like to proceed further with you. We believe we would
like to represent you....however.....
The Coverage Report usually takes the editor 1-2 hours and is $95... The
Pitch sheet takes about three hours of the editors time and is $189. If you
request them both at the same time, the total cost is discounted to $245.
PLEASE NOTE: WE ARE NOT ASKING FOR MONEY.
*wink* *wink* *nudge* *nudge*

Sounds like a waiter at a fancy restaurant who says they have no seating available, then gives you a meaningful look. Once you give him a $50, a table miraculously opens. The difference, of course, is that Fletcher will show you to the back door. "This way to the egress."

Thanks for posting. Their gall never ceases to amaze me.
 
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aka eraser

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winter said:
The mark of a successful writer is their fundamental appreciation for their development team.

That's the funniest thing I've read in a long time.

So success is not cashing cheques and receiving plaudits from readers. It's engaging in group hugs with your (bogus) agent/coach/editor.

I wanna try one:

The mark of a desperate con man is his inevitable appearance on message boards wherein he becomes an object more to be parodied than scorned.

Okay. Maybe 50-50.
 

Duncan J Macdonald

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James D. Macdonald said:
Oh, that's rich! If they aren't asking for money, what's $245? Gefilte fish?

victoriastrauss said:
Nah. Chopped liver.
Hey! If to you it's chopped liver, send it to me! I'll use it wisely in my vocation of helping working girls uplift themselves.
 

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Anyone who still has any doubts about the legitimacy of The Screenplay Agency--or who just wants a good time--should read Jim Macdonald's Take My Logline ... Please. Do be sure to follow the links, and the comment thread is bound to be interesting very shortly, as well.
 

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My response from the screenplay agency. Betcha it looks like every one elses who sent a synopsis to them.

Thank you for your query to the Screenplay Literary Agency. Based on
your
query form information we would like to see your work and learn a
little bit
more about your goals and your work.


1) Would you please send us an electronic copy
of your screenplay for further evaluation?

Please email your manuscript to
[email protected] .
(We accept Final Draft, Movie Magic, Screenwiter, and pdf, doc,
and
rtf)

2) Would you please answer these 2 questions
in the body of the SAME email? (Just copy and paste
the questions).

A. How long have you been writing, and
what are your goals as a writer?

B. Do you consider your writing 'ready-to-go',
or do you think it needs some polishing.


You may send either 30 or so pages, or the entire screenplay, whichever
you
are more comfortable sending to us. Your screenplay is completely safe
within our company. We take care to properly manage all access and if
we
don't end up working together, we delete all files.

Please DO NOT include any questions with your submission. If you have
a
question, please send it to [email protected] where the
proper people may address your question. Most of the questions you may
have
are answered on the website and at the bottom of this email. Please
see the
FAQs below.
 

DaveKuzminski

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Hey, Victoria, Ann, Jim, Jenna, let's keep a record of how many writers we save from the LAG and its tentacles. We could set up a tally that each of us could mark for each letter of thanks we receive just to let Fletcher know how much money we're saving for writers. I'm sure he'd appreciate knowing that. ;)
 

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DaveKuzminski said:
Hey, Victoria, Ann, Jim, Jenna, let's keep a record of how many writers we save from the LAG and its tentacles. We could set up a tally that each of us could mark for each letter of thanks we receive just to let Fletcher know how much money we're saving for writers. I'm sure he'd appreciate knowing that. ;)
Yes! Yes! That's a great idea. I'm going to start a thread and sticky it.

I suggest that rather than add a post each time we report a thankful writer, we edit our initial posts to add the numbers.

- Victoria
 

MMo

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HapiSofi said:
On a slightly different subject:

O AW regulars, is there any way we can find out whether Bobby Fletcher's got a failed book(s) somewhere in his past?

While there are scam agents and publishers who aren't failed authors, that description fits all the scammers I've seen who strike back by saying their accusers are themselves failed authors. Also, I've noticed that Fletcher's sockpuppets react like they've been stung when people tell them they don't write very well.

The copyright office has several Robert (Middle Initial) Fletcher instruments, but no Robert M. Fletcher in the current database. The following are Robert (NMI) Fletcher, and there is no way of knowing if this is the Robert Fletcher of this thread. And of course I have no further information other than what is given here.


Registrations:

Books, Music, Etc.
1. Registration Number: TXu-1-255-157
Title: The fall of Noldur.
Note: Cataloged from appl. only.
Claimant: acRobert Fletcher
Created: 2005
Registered: 25Aug05
Miscellaneous: Rights & permissions info. on original appl. in C.O.
Special Codes: 1/B


Transfers:
Item 1 OF 1 V1743 P184 (COHD)
Date Recorded: 29Aug79
Date Executed: 5Jul79
Party 1: Robert Fletcher.
Party 2: Paramount Pictures Corporation.
Note: Assignment of copyright.
 

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What I'm loving is watching the scam-a-scammer meme spread in the screenwriter blogosphere. :ROFL:
 

victoriastrauss

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The back and forth with winter lost its usefulness (and its entertainment value) some time ago. I've split off most of his/her posts and the responses to them, and sent them to the Take It Outside topic. The thread there is still called The Screenplay Agency.

- Victoria
 

Mojo

Another Concern!!!

I just learned about TSA recently online and started researching because it seemed too good to be true. Thanks all of you for the heads up. I have to admit, the opportunity to send something in- only if it means I have to say "no" to proceeding further if they want money, is still tempting.

My real concern is that, if they really aren't in it for what they say, then what's to stop them from stealing the ideas/concepts in whatever I submit and working it into their own screenplay (assuming my screenplay is original and interesting enough!)

Any thoughts on that? Thanks again- very good to read so many perspectives.

Mojo
 

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Mojo said:
My real concern is that, if they really aren't in it for what they say, then what's to stop them from stealing the ideas/concepts in whatever I submit and working it into their own screenplay (assuming my screenplay is original and interesting enough!)
They'd need the talent to do so and the knowledge to sell it once they did. They don't got neither. :cool:
 

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Mojo said:
...what's to stop them from stealing the ideas/concepts in whatever I submit and working it into their own screenplay (assuming my screenplay is original and interesting enough!)


That would require that they sell something ... which so far they've shown no ability to do.
 

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James D. Macdonald said:
That would require that they sell something ... which so far they've shown no ability to do.
And to write something, which they definitely can't do.
 

VJwriter

Roundabout to The Screenplay Agency

I found Hart Literary Management in the Hollywood Representation Directory. The listed Web site took me not to Hart Literary, but to a page with links. The first link was The Screenplay Agency, which I've already shied away from, thanks to stopping by the Water Cooler. Hart Literary looks authentic. WGA affiliation. Is anyone familiar with Hart Literary?
 

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VJwriter said:
I found Hart Literary Management in the Hollywood Representation Directory. The listed Web site took me not to Hart Literary, but to a page with links. The first link was The Screenplay Agency, which I've already shied away from, thanks to stopping by the Water Cooler. Hart Literary looks authentic. WGA affiliation. Is anyone familiar with Hart Literary?
A separate thread has been created to address this agency, so further discussion would be better directed here:
http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=30065
 

VJwriter

About Hart Literary

The Hart Literary Management Web site is listed in The Hollywood Creative Directory as hartliterary.com. That took me to a list of "related Websites," with The Screenplay Agency topping the list. Others listed were New York Literary Agency, Childrens Literary Agency and Desert Rose Agency. Hart Literary is WGA approved, so why does their listed Web site take me elsewhere. It's a minefield out there! Thank gosh I chanced by The Water Cooler! I'm also adding a copy of "The Street Smart Writer" to my library.
 

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Sorry for all the misinformation

I'm giving you two answers to your question about what you've read. The first answer is the short one, and the second is the long one. I apologize in advance for any 'attitude' that you read in my reply, but it's a gut/core issue for us and we feel pretty strongly about certain things.


The short answer ....
We told the self-proclaimed industry watchdogs to shove it.
We've drawn the battle lines and we've said that unpublished
writers have very little chance of success unless they think differently.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
We told the so-called watchdogs that they are hurting authors by maintaining 'old school' ideas. We explained that the agency business is so competitive now, that we can only focus on one thing, selling the work. The author has to take responsibility for bringing their work to industry standards. In short, we told the industry watchdogs that they don't get it, and they are promulgating old ideas that no longer apply. It didn't go over very well and they chatter incessantly, but if you think a writer has thick skin, you should try being an agent.

We've been in business now long enough to know that our model works, and that buyers respect the fact that EVERY AUTHOR WE REPRESENT HAS BEEN THROUGH A RIGOROUS CRITIQUE AND EDITING PROCESS. What you read on the boards is just authors whining about having to do more work, which they want us to do for free. Think about it for just a minute. If you were buying an unpublished author's work, wouldn't you want to buy work that had been through the proverbial wringer? And wouldn't you want to buy work that could get to market faster, because the grunt work, the editing, had already been done.

In the end, the truth of the matter is that you really want an agency that is willing to break a few rules on your behalf. The 'old school' doesn't want you to get in, and that's the truth. We have 4 sales, most agencies only have 1 or two. We will double that this year we think and you really need to consider whether some 'anonymous' board poster really has your best interest at heart or if you should give us a try, eyes wide open, and see if we don't keep our promises which are * We respect what you have accomplished thus far as a writer, * We believe that great authors are made, not born. We are willing to
develop talent. * We pledge straight talk in a confusing and old-school industry. * We can't promise a sale. We can promise a professional relationship.



------------------------------------------------------------------
Here's one author's reply to this email. We hope you are this discerning. "Thank you for the trouble you took to explain what's on those boards. I think I understand your frustration with the critics and nay sayers now. I have reviewed again the on-line comments and sources and agree that there is really nothing substantive in either their remarks or criticisms. In fact most of them whine about nearly everyone".
-----------------------------------------------------------------


Here's the long answer:
----------------------------------------
We are keenly aware of the negative material on a lot of writer's message boards. I thank you for 'seeking first to understand". Once again, sorry for the length of this email, but there's a lot to try to communicate to you.

I know it is confusing to authors. Luckily most authors can detect that there's something very negatively one sided about most boards, and a good author will ask for more information.

I think you would agree that it's tough to even get a reply from an Agency. Most authors (98%) can't get the time of day from an Agent. Why? Because invariably the author's work needs improvement and if an Agent takes the time to say, "I like the idea, but you need a little help" the Agent is blackballed by every writers blog on the net. So, it's easier to say no, or not reply, than to actually try to help a writer with a good idea and a good start.

Successful writers of books and screenplays use editors and coaches, always have, always will.. if you've never worked with an editor, you should. I would say that 95+% of the books on the shelves today have had an editors touch, either through the publishing company or as directed by an agent. There are two levels of editing. The first is our internal level. The second is the publisher level. When you pass our first level, it means that we will put our reputation on the line for you, however, it doesn't mean that it has been exhaustively edited, like a publisher would do. Their edit is MUCH more extensive. Our edit requirements are related to pitching and selling only.

THIS IS THE REAL ISSUE: If an agent assists the writer by telling them to get editing and then the agent will represent them, they get blackballed. So, here's a situation where potentially great work is 'waiting in the wings' so to speak, and can't get access to the market because Agents are overwhelmed and gunshy.

Luckily (for those authors that can see through the bs), we've decided that the old model is dead and we want new fresh talent. We want authors that want to improve and have their chance. And, our management team is a group of business warriors that basically say, "screw the naysayers because buyers love our model".

Why do buyers (publishers and producers) love our model? Because they know that we've forced the writer to jump through a series of hoops to prove their mettle. And the writers whine, whine, whine, and the publishers say, "whew, thanks for bringing us great work and for filtering out the crackpot writers that want the world and don't have an understanding of how competitive the market is." BUYERS WANT WRITERS THAT HAVE INVESTED IN THEMSELVES AND THEIR WRITING.

But why all the negative press you might ask? In short, the message boards attract unsuccessful writers. It's quite a statistical anomoly isn't it. A successful writer isn't sitting around responding to message boards, a successful writer is improving their craft, making submissions, and writing. As I'm sure you've seen the pettiness on the boards.. That pettiness is, to me, worse than a National Enquirer that you read in the grocery line, and frankly, I think the message boards attract the same caliber of people. Also, just for the fun of it, you should ask the people that work the boards to be your agent, and see how many writers run to help you.

LET ME STATE THIS AGAIN.. ASK THE PEOPLE ON THE MESSAGE BOARDS, BECAUSE THEY ARE SO SMART, WHAT THEY'VE SOLD, AND WHO THEIR AGENT WAS... And whether they'd be your agent. <I'm sorry to be a bit cynical here, but I'm sure you can see why? Nobody on those boards is going to work for you.. they aren't going to coach you, prep you, and try to sell your work.>

That said, we've come to thank these boards. The boards weed out three main categories of writers that we are actually glad to be rid of: 1) Authors that don't have a clue, 2) Authors that can't make up their mind for themselves and don't have any "grit", and 3) the SFN's (writers that want Something for Nothing). I hope that you aren't in any of those three categories. The Something For Nothing authors really get my goat, but that's another rant. Those are the authors that think we'll bear all their expenses because they've 'written the next bestseller'... egads...


Reread the 4 bullets under my signature. That's our promise. It's simple and it's understandable, and we deliver on it all day, every day. (Like this email really).

So, in conclusion, this is what I would do, if I were in your shoes, I'd proceed with us, eyes wide open, and see if we meet or exceed our four business tenets below, A) Respect, B) Building Talent, 3) Straight Talk, and a 4) Professional Relationship.

Just for grins, and so that you know we provide a service of value to aspiring authors, I would like you to see some of the unprompted quotes that we receive on a daily basis. Our clients say it best. The quotes below are unedited and as you can see, quite from the heart. (We have lots more of these.) If you are really cynical, you will probably believe we made them up, but I promise you, we can prove every one of them.

=======================

"Just a note to say, whatever the outcome of my submission, it's refreshing to engage an agent who will a) take an email submission, b) turn it round as quick you've committed to do and c) actively work with a writer. Submissions are daunting enough anyway without having to wait ten weeks for an impersonalised slip of paper. Here's to you."

"It is refreshing to get an honest professional opinion of my work, it make me realise just how much I don't know about the written word and its presentation."

Dear Georgina, I'd like you to know how highly and gratefully I regard the clarity with which you explain the process as well as your reliability. I have complete trust in both your abilities and ethical standards. Best wishes, Judith

It's been a long time since I left school with considerable number of years passing before I became interested in writing again. I would like you to thank you for working with me and let it be known that I look at this as a new beginning and rebirth of my education.

You don't know how nice it is to have such timely responses. I am sure I am not the only writer that puts a lot of heart into their work and I have to say, I have "kept mine tucked away in the closet" for many, many years. I just enjoy writing, but didn't know if I would ever try and submit it to anyone. Making the decision to do that has been somewhat of a nerve-wracking process. Your timely responses and professional, yet "down-to-earth" responses are making the process a lot easier. At this time, I am not submitting my work to anyone else, because you have impressed me the most up to this point. Even if we do not end up working together, I felt it was important to pass this along to you.

Dear Georgina: Your professional zeal and resourcefulness cannot be overemphasized seeing the volatile-oceanic-wave called the American Hollywood with its impregnable sales frontiers.I hold you dearly to my heart in my every prayers towards our mutual success now and...very soon in sbsequent works.I doff my heart after your every professional spirit imagining the energy, sweat and travellings involved. Thanks for everything you stand for professionally.

Thank you for your constructive feedback. I found your critique of my work very informative, and it concluded many things that I already knew. I really do need to improve on my punctuation skills, and that has been something I have struggled with for some time. I appreciate your suggestions on materials to improve this, and I plan on taking an advanced grammar and puctuation class at the college I am attending. Several other points you made were also very informative. I know I have a long way to go before I am a "professional" writer, but I am glad that you agreed that the potential is definitely there. I'd also like to thank you and your company for staying in contact with me through this process. I would, and will, come back to your company if I need further material critiqued. Thank you again for your time.

I just want to say I have been rejected for years by Agents and Publishers. After awhile it all seems pointless. But I am in this for the long run and will never give up and never give in. Whether you accept me or not you have restored my faith and hope that someone out there is concerned and listening to what writings go through. I look forward to learning all that I can from you and your associates.

"After having reread all the information sent to me, I must say that I am impressed by the way your agency has handled the science, or art of appreciating new sources of writing. If only all agencies displayed your model the world may be a better place. Your FAQ has answered all of my questions and i am eager to get to work."

===========================

WE ARE CREATING THE MOST POWERFUL AGENCY GROUP IN THE UNITED STATES. Every author that we represent has been fully edited and we know, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that their work is good enough for publication. Unfortunately, the ones that 'wash out', tend to grouse and *****. If you can make it through our process, then you will be in an elite group that buyers respect. We never promise a sale, but we can promise that if we present your work, it will get respect from our buyers.

Best to you in your career whatever your decision. I hope you give us a chance to prove ourselves. What's your real risk anyway?