What Western are you reading?

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Shadow_Ferret

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"Flint" by Louis L'Amour. I'll tell you what. He breaks every rule. There are scads of backstory. Lots of flashbacks. Loads of head-hopping. I'll be reading along and suddenly I'll realize there was a POV change, or I went into, or came out of a flashback, and I'll have to go back a few paragraphs to figure when that happened. He never uses any line breaks to signal the change, they just blur together. And yet, because of his writing style, and the fact that he's a damned fine story teller, I keep on reading because he's got me caring about the characters and its a fine adventure.
 

Dave Williams

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I'm not reading any Westerns at the moment, but...

I have a handful of books by a writer named Lou Cameron. Cybernia, Barca, The Empty Quarter, and Tancredi. They're more or less in the "adventure" and "police" genres, and I've had a couple of them since the 1970s. I've always checked for more Cameron stuff when hitting used book stores or flea markets, but he apparently didn't sell a lot in my area. Or everyone is holding on to them...

Yesterday I happened to think of him while I was sitting at the computer, and a few clicks later I found out what happened to him - he moved mostly over to Westerns. He wrote 50-odd of the Longarm novels under the house name "Tabor Evans", a series called Renegade as "Ramsay Thorne", and a series called Stringer under his own name, as well as a stack of standalone Westerns.

Westerns aren't high on my reading preference, but I guess I'll snag half a dozen of Cameron's and check them out. If they're anything like his other books that I already have, I'll eventually snag them all...
 

SouthboundTrain

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I've read a few Craig Johnson "Longmire" novels, modern-day western mysteries you might call them. They're pretty good though not the typical western one might think of.
 

Jack Judah

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I've read a few Craig Johnson "Longmire" novels, modern-day western mysteries you might call them. They're pretty good though not the typical western one might think of.

I've never been a big fan of mystery novels. After the television show aired, I was intrigued enough to pick up Cold Dish. Holy Cow! Was I hooked. Guy can write, that's for sure. I'd actually like to see him try his hand at a Western.
 

Jack Judah

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I've never read any Longmire, but modern day western mystery just doesn't sound right. I like my westerns set in the old west.

Shadow Ferret, up until I read them, I would've agreed with you whole heartedly. Now though. . . I'm not the type who reads a book, likes it, then suddenly becomes an unpaid press agent for the author. But in the case of the Longmire series? I cannot recommend Johnson's books loudly or often enough. Give him a shot. You won't regret it.
 

Jack Judah

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Just finished rereading Hombre. Unquestionably one of my favorites, even if it is depressing as all hell. The western genre lost a great author when Elmore Leonard switched to crime novels.
 

CWatts

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Just popping in here to say I just finished reading Silver Lies by Ann Parker. It's a historical mystery set in 1879/80 Leadville, CO and the MC is a female saloon owner, Inez Stannert, who is fierce and stubborn and an all around hoot. There's four books in the series and I've already started in on the second, Iron Ties.
 

J.J.PITTS

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Rereading The Walking Drum, by Louis L'Amour.
 

braveboy

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"Flint" by Louis L'Amour. I'll tell you what. He breaks every rule. There are scads of backstory. Lots of flashbacks. Loads of head-hopping. I'll be reading along and suddenly I'll realize there was a POV change, or I went into, or came out of a flashback, and I'll have to go back a few paragraphs to figure when that happened. He never uses any line breaks to signal the change, they just blur together. And yet, because of his writing style, and the fact that he's a damned fine story teller, I keep on reading because he's got me caring about the characters and its a fine adventure.

Flint is probably my favorite L'Amour book. Right now am reading his "Education Of A Wandering Man" ...It's not a western, but sure gives you some thoughts about where he got his ideas.
 

Jerome Price

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I'm reading "The Earth is Weeping," by Peter Cozzens, probably the best account of the Indian wars in the west. I would highly recommend this to anyone who wants an overall view of the whole Indian campaign in the west. My next read will probably be "Dodge City," by Tom Clavin
 

Taylor Harbin

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I’m listening to a bunch of L’lamour novels on Audible. I’m currently on “Bannon.”
 

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