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Editing for authors: because every writer needs a good editor.

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Set2Stun

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Hey, this is Kevin from Canada. I'm so glad I found this place. I've always had an interest in writing, but never did more than write the occasional short story to share with family and friends. Then I figured, you know what, I've only got this one life, so why not just go for it? I started working on my first novel, mostly on weekends, and got up to 30,000 words after a couple of months. I found it kind of difficult to keep focused when I always had to put it down and go back to work on Monday, so I took an unpaid leave for the month of August to finish it, and I did. It's probably really, really bad, but at least I can say that I actually did it. I am a writer now.

It's unlikely to sell since it's my first novel and I am an unknown, but there's certainly no harm in submitting it. I have no delusions about the publishing business; I know that the odds of getting an advance are extremely low, and even if I did get a royalties-only contract, it's unlikely that I'd generate much income from it. But nothing ventured, nothing gained.

For the past month I have been searching for any legitimate publisher who accepts unsolicited, unagented submissions for science fiction novels. I have learned a lot from this process so far. I was kind of surprised how few publishers are interested in science fiction and fantasy. I've been at it for weeks and I have submitted to only eight such publishers (the search continues). DAW sent me a rejection in only 17 days, which probably means they didn't read past the query letter, but I still appreciate their getting back to me that quickly. It will probably be many months before I get more rejections.

These forums have been helpful in learning more about publishing. Learning about the existence of "vanity presses" did not surprise me much; there are predators in every industry, looking to con people out of their money. What did surprise me was to discover the "author mills." I very well could have been duped into signing with one of these kinds of places had I not read about them here first. What a fascinating concept - "publish" the work for an author by just putting it online as an eBook for them, do literally nothing, and take the lion's share of the profits when the author gets their friends, family, and colleagues to buy it. The haul isn't as lucrative per mark as the vanity presses, but I imagine the volume makes up for that. To prey on the desire of authors to be validated. Unconscionable.

My journey has only just begun. I have started working on a second standalone novel, which will probably be of higher quality, now that I've had some practice. I'm unlikely to succeed, but it's not impossible. While scrutinizing publishers' websites, I actually came across a familiar name. A guy who I wrote for the university paper with (he later became editor) has two novels in print. The second one debuted just recently, and he even got to do a signing at a Chapter's bookstore back home (we are from a small town of 100K - I moved to a larger city in 2014). We weren't close and I haven't spoken to him in over a decade, but it's still really cool to see someone that I used to know succeed in the publishing business. It gives me a little hope.

Anyways, I just wanted to say that this site has been very helpful so far, and I look forward to learning more about writing and publishing from you all.

Sokath, his eyes uncovered!
 

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Hey, this is Kevin from Canada. I'm so glad I found this place. I've always had an interest in writing, but never did more than write the occasional short story to share with family and friends. Then I figured, you know what, I've only got this one life, so why not just go for it? I started working on my first novel, mostly on weekends, and got up to 30,000 words after a couple of months. I found it kind of difficult to keep focused when I always had to put it down and go back to work on Monday, so I took an unpaid leave for the month of August to finish it, and I did. It's probably really, really bad, but at least I can say that I actually did it. I am a writer now.

It's unlikely to sell since it's my first novel and I am an unknown, but there's certainly no harm in submitting it. I have no delusions about the publishing business; I know that the odds of getting an advance are extremely low, and even if I did get a royalties-only contract, it's unlikely that I'd generate much income from it. But nothing ventured, nothing gained.

For the past month I have been searching for any legitimate publisher who accepts unsolicited, unagented submissions for science fiction novels. I have learned a lot from this process so far. I was kind of surprised how few publishers are interested in science fiction and fantasy. I've been at it for weeks and I have submitted to only eight such publishers (the search continues). DAW sent me a rejection in only 17 days, which probably means they didn't read past the query letter, but I still appreciate their getting back to me that quickly. It will probably be many months before I get more rejections.

These forums have been helpful in learning more about publishing. Learning about the existence of "vanity presses" did not surprise me much; there are predators in every industry, looking to con people out of their money. What did surprise me was to discover the "author mills." I very well could have been duped into signing with one of these kinds of places had I not read about them here first. What a fascinating concept - "publish" the work for an author by just putting it online as an eBook for them, do literally nothing, and take the lion's share of the profits when the author gets their friends, family, and colleagues to buy it. The haul isn't as lucrative per mark as the vanity presses, but I imagine the volume makes up for that. To prey on the desire of authors to be validated. Unconscionable.

My journey has only just begun. I have started working on a second standalone novel, which will probably be of higher quality, now that I've had some practice. I'm unlikely to succeed, but it's not impossible. While scrutinizing publishers' websites, I actually came across a familiar name. A guy who I wrote for the university paper with (he later became editor) has two novels in print. The second one debuted just recently, and he even got to do a signing at a Chapter's bookstore back home (we are from a small town of 100K - I moved to a larger city in 2014). We weren't close and I haven't spoken to him in over a decade, but it's still really cool to see someone that I used to know succeed in the publishing business. It gives me a little hope.

Anyways, I just wanted to say that this site has been very helpful so far, and I look forward to learning more about writing and publishing from you all.

Sokath, his eyes uncovered!
Hi Kevin,

Congratulations on finishing one novel and starting another! I wish you much success with getting them published. Remember, if you feel it's taking too long to be accepted by a traditional publisher, you can always publish your books yourself on Amazon.

Best wishes,
Fay
 
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Maryn

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Finishing a novel is huge, Kevin. You're among the self-chosen few who start one and get to type "The End." So congratulations on the major accomplishment.

This is just the start. In all likelihood, no matter how great this novel is, it could be improved. That's where the zillion things you can learn here by reading boards, asking questions, critiquing the work of others, beta reading, and more, come in. Whether your novel needs tweaks or to be stripped down to its frame and rebuilt, you can make it better, and you should. It's a rare first draft that's also the best draft.

So my advice is, for the short term, forget about publishing it quickly. Spend the time learning how to polish this novel to a tasteful gleam, identifying the right publishers for it, learning how to approach them or get an agent who will do that on your behalf, all while getting a start on the next one. During this time you can also learn about self-publishing, including your responsibilities to the work and potential readers and the pitfalls awaiting the unaware. (Not you, though.)

Maryn, pleased to meet you
 

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Welcome, Set2Stun!

YOU WROTE A NOVEL! Crikey, that's an amazing achievement. And, remember: Bad novels can be revised to become good, then very good, then excellent novels. But novels that haven't been written can't be revised.

You'll find lots of helping hands here.
 
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Set2Stun

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Hi Kevin,

Congratulations on finishing one novel and starting another! I wish you much success with getting them published. Remember, if you feel it's taking too long to be accepted by a traditional publisher, you can always publish your books yourself on Amazon.

Best wishes,
Fay
Thank you for your kind greeting! My plans are to try to sell it for about a year, and if I have no luck, then I'll try to find an agent for a couple of months before I switch my focus to selling the new one. My interest in traditional publishing is, for a large part, driven by my total lack of skills in marketing. I don't use social media at all (I guess other than this place, now?), so it'd be difficult for me to generate any interest on my own. I will have to check out the forums here about self-publishing as I haven't done much research on this option yet, and it might make the most sense for me in the end.
 
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Set2Stun

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Finishing a novel is huge, Kevin. You're among the self-chosen few who start one and get to type "The End." So congratulations on the major accomplishment.

This is just the start. In all likelihood, no matter how great this novel is, it could be improved. That's where the zillion things you can learn here by reading boards, asking questions, critiquing the work of others, beta reading, and more, come in. Whether your novel needs tweaks or to be stripped down to its frame and rebuilt, you can make it better, and you should. It's a rare first draft that's also the best draft.

So my advice is, for the short term, forget about publishing it quickly. Spend the time learning how to polish this novel to a tasteful gleam, identifying the right publishers for it, learning how to approach them or get an agent who will do that on your behalf, all while getting a start on the next one. During this time you can also learn about self-publishing, including your responsibilities to the work and potential readers and the pitfalls awaiting the unaware. (Not you, though.)

Maryn, pleased to meet you
Pleased to meet you as well, and thank you for this advice! I agree that I have rushed into submissions way ahead of schedule and that I should be focused more on editing. I've read through it many, many times and now regret my first couple of submissions (the version I am submitting today is even several thousand words longer now). I'm going to let it sit for a few months and then take a fresh look at it. I guess I was just taking one of Heinlein's 5 Rules to heart; "You must refrain from rewriting, except to editorial order." It could be that this rule only really applies to someone who was a master like he was :D
 

Set2Stun

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Welcome, Set2Stun!

YOU WROTE A NOVEL! Crikey, that's an amazing achievement. And, remember: Bad novels can be revised to become good, then very good, then excellent novels. But novels that haven't been written can't be revised.

You'll find lots of helping hands here.
Thank you! Yes, this place seems to be just what I need to learn and grow. Thanks for all that you are doing for this community !
 

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(Good plan, letting it sit a while. I rest my novels a minimum of four months, more often six, until it's like someone else wrote them--badly. I see all kinds of fixes I couldn't see when I was too close.)
 
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Izz

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Welcome to AW, Kevin! It's great to meet you :)

As you've already discovered, AW is a most excellent resource. Best writing place on the nets, in my opinion. And not only do we have tons of info regarding agents and publishers (I myself discovered the site when searching up a publisher after an acquaintance got offered a deal I thought was just too good to be true), but we also have more information on all other aspects of the writing craft than you can shake a really big stick at. On top of all that, we also have an awesome, diverse community to hang out within.

Please carefully read the Newbies Guide you were linked to when you signed up, plus the sticky threads at the top of each subforum. They'll help you understand AW's overall rules plus the culture and etiquette of the various spaces within.

As has already been posited by others in the thread, finishing a novel is an awesome achievement. Typically, though, there's plenty more to do before it's at a publishable standard (but also, don't worry about being an unknown - every well known writer started out being an unknown writer). Why not head on down to the Share Your Work section and browse some of the pieces and critiques there? You'll likely find a whole heap you can immediately apply to your own writing. There's a 50-post requirement before you can start a thread in that area but if you're keen you can always offer crit of your own (again, you'll likely find when you do this that your own writing leaps ahead). Before posting there, please browse the stickies in the Intro to Share Your Work board. You'll also likely enjoy our Science Fiction | Fantasy genre discussion room, as well as our Novels board, and the AW Roundtable.

Explore, lurk, join in conversations you find fun or interesting, make friends, enjoy yourself!

See you around the boards :D
Izz
 
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Set2Stun

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Welcome to AW, Kevin! It's great to meet you :)

As you've already discovered, AW is a most excellent resource. Best writing place on the nets, in my opinion. And not only do we have tons of info regarding agents and publishers (I myself discovered the site when searching up a publisher after an acquaintance got offered a deal I thought was just too good to be true), but we also have more information on all other aspects of the writing craft than you can shake a really big stick at. On top of all that, we also have an awesome, diverse community to hang out within.

Please carefully read the Newbies Guide you were linked to when you signed up, plus the sticky threads at the top of each subforum. They'll help you understand AW's overall rules plus the culture and etiquette of the various spaces within.

As has already been posited by others in the thread, finishing a novel is an awesome achievement. Typically, though, there's plenty more to do before it's at a publishable standard (but also, don't worry about being an unknown - every well known writer started out being an unknown writer). Why not head on down to the Share Your Work section and browse some of the pieces and critiques there? You'll likely find a whole heap you can immediately apply to your own writing. There's a 50-post requirement before you can start a thread in that area but if you're keen you can always offer crit of your own (again, you'll likely find when you do this that your own writing leaps ahead). Before posting there, please browse the stickies in the Intro to Share Your Work board. You'll also likely enjoy our Science Fiction | Fantasy genre discussion room, as well as our Novels board, and the AW Roundtable.

Explore, lurk, join in conversations you find fun or interesting, make friends, enjoy yourself!

See you around the boards :D
Izz
Thank you, it's great to be here! Checking out the works of other unpublished writers is near the top of my list of what I want to do here. I only know one other person who writes anything in "real life," so it will be nice to get some perspective. What looks ready vs what needs some work, and how to get to that point where one is ready to submit. Very cool site !
 

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Welcome.

I found it kind of difficult to keep focused when I always had to put it down and go back to work on Monday, so I took an unpaid leave for the month of August to finish it, and I did. It's probably really, really bad, but at least I can say that I actually did it. I am a writer now.

I mean, I wouldn't say it's the greatest idea to take unpaid leave to finish a novel, but I'm sure you planned it out beforehand.

Personally, I just write on workdays as well as weekends, but I imagine there are some jobs -- like long-haul trucking -- where that probably isn't an option because you're just on the road all week or whatever for 14-20 hour shifts (although I guess truckers could dictate into a phone). However, if you can't do a lot, doing something still gets you closer to finishing.

That said, I'm sure you'll find your next books a lot easier now that you've done it once. Grats on finishing the first of what will hopefully be many.

It's unlikely to sell since it's my first novel and I am an unknown, but there's certainly no harm in submitting it.

tbh, I hadn't learned that tidbit until I was nearing the end of writing my first book (or first draft of my first novel. Had I known that, I might have started with something else.

Granted, revising down the road is always an option.

I have no delusions about the publishing business; I know that the odds of getting an advance are extremely low, and even if I did get a royalties-only contract, it's unlikely that I'd generate much income from it. But nothing ventured, nothing gained.

I mean, a lot of publishers pay advances. It's more some smaller indies that don't, and a lot of smaller indie publishers who don't pay advances usually have other red flags, too. There's a whole section on AW dedicated to questionable publishers, and it's not just vanity presses.

For the past month I have been searching for any legitimate publisher who accepts unsolicited, unagented submissions for science fiction novels. I have learned a lot from this process so far. I was kind of surprised how few publishers are interested in science fiction and fantasy. I've been at it for weeks and I have submitted to only eight such publishers (the search continues). DAW sent me a rejection in only 17 days, which probably means they didn't read past the query letter, but I still appreciate their getting back to me that quickly. It will probably be many months before I get more rejections.

There are a lot out there, but the problem is that nothing is necessarily easy to find.

I'm not sure why you don't just want to go the agent route, though.

My journey has only just begun. I have started working on a second standalone novel, which will probably be of higher quality, now that I've had some practice. I'm unlikely to succeed, but it's not impossible.

tbh, whenever I think, "Gee, this seems tough," I remember that Brandon Sanderson was working on this thirteenth book before he sold his first manuscript (either book 5 or 6). Personally, I've got the drafting side of things down, but I need to work harder on revision and then develop better querying/submission strategies.

While scrutinizing publishers' websites, I actually came across a familiar name. A guy who I wrote for the university paper with (he later became editor) has two novels in print. The second one debuted just recently, and he even got to do a signing at a Chapter's bookstore back home (we are from a small town of 100K - I moved to a larger city in 2014). We weren't close and I haven't spoken to him in over a decade, but it's still really cool to see someone that I used to know succeed in the publishing business. It gives me a little hope.

You should consider reaching out to him. A little networking never hurts.

My plans are to try to sell it for about a year, and if I have no luck, then I'll try to find an agent for a couple of months

I don't get that strategy at all. You should either start by querying agents or do both at the same time. Agents are generally going to have an easier time getting publishers to consider your work, although if you've already submitted to those places they might consider it a lost cause.
 
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mccardey

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I've read through it many, many times and now regret my first couple of submissions (the version I am submitting today is even several thousand words longer now). I'm going to let it sit for a few months and then take a fresh look at it.
Might be better to hold off on the submissions until you've had time to polish and perfect. As Maryn says - it's vanishingly rare that a first draft is the best draft, and you don't usually get second chances on subs. Also - if you're planning on having an agent, you need to hold off subbing to publishers and let them do it. Nothing makes them more despondent than finding out you've already been subbing, because see first paragraph.


ETA: Oh and welcome to AW and congrats on finishing your first draft. Lots of people never get that far :)
 
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regdog

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Welcome to AW


Take some time and read the Newbie Guide and the Stickies found
at the top of Forum pages. They are your best guide to learning about
Absolute Write.

Stop by the Weekend Progress Report each week to brag about your weekly writing accomplishments. Awesome smilies and awards are given out.

Please read the FAQ about posting photos.


In fact we have lots of brilliant FAQs check them out.


Members who want to start a thread in Share Your Work to have work critiqued need
50 posts. Don’t make a mad dash to reach your 50 posts. That is frowned upon and can lead to your posts being deleted.
Take some time to greet fellow newbies, critique other members’ works, or join a discussion.


Announcements, Events and Self Promotion is for active members only. All obvious spam will be deleted on sight! Here’s how to Promote With Aplomb.
 
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Set2Stun

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Welcome.



I mean, I wouldn't say it's the greatest idea to take unpaid leave to finish a novel, but I'm sure you planned it out beforehand.

Personally, I just write on workdays as well as weekends, but I imagine there are some jobs -- like long-haul trucking -- where that probably isn't an option because you're just on the road all week or whatever for 14-20 hour shifts (although I guess truckers could dictate into a phone). However, if you can't do a lot, doing something still gets you closer to finishing.

That said, I'm sure you'll find your next books a lot easier now that you've done it once. Grats on finishing the first of what will hopefully be many.



tbh, I hadn't learned that tidbit until I was nearing the end of writing my first book (or first draft of my first novel. Had I known that, I might have started with something else.

Granted, revising down the road is always an option.



I mean, a lot of publishers pay advances. It's more some smaller indies that don't, and a lot of smaller indie publishers who don't pay advances usually have other red flags, too. There's a whole section on AW dedicated to questionable publishers, and it's not just vanity presses.



There are a lot out there, but the problem is that nothing is necessarily easy to find.

I'm not sure why you don't just want to go the agent route, though.



tbh, whenever I think, "Gee, this seems tough," I remember that Brandon Sanderson was working on this thirteenth book before he sold his first manuscript (either book 5 or 6). Personally, I've got the drafting side of things down, but I need to work harder on revision and then develop better querying/submission strategies.



You should consider reaching out to him. A little networking never hurts.



I don't get that strategy at all. You should either start by querying agents or do both at the same time. Agents are generally going to have an easier time getting publishers to consider your work, although if you've already submitted to those places they might consider it a lost cause.
Thank you for taking the time to provide this considered feedback! If it sounds like I do not know what I am doing, it's because I don't :D

I have read about the value of having an agent, which would work well for me since I am not skilled at selling myself or my writing, but I decided on trying to submit on my own after perusing the Writers Union of Canada website. They claim that there are only a few dozen literary agents in Canada, and that 80% of published authors in the country achieved this goal without an agent.

I do think that querying and submitting will be my greatest challenge, and that's if my writing is actually worth publishing, which I still am not sure of. As for the networking thing, I can't force myself to engage in it even in my regular job life. It just feels weird to try to use other people for one's own benefit when you don't really have anything to offer them in return. If I ever do get a legitimate offer though, I'm definitely going to say hi :)

And yeah, I had to cash out a little stock to pay for August, and I don't think management will let me do that again for at least a couple of years, so I do need to find a new strategy for writing while working. It just started to get frustrating, having to stop when I'd get myself into "the zone," you know?
 

Set2Stun

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Might be better to hold off on the submissions until you've had time to polish and perfect. As Maryn says - it's vanishingly rare that a first draft is the best draft, and you don't usually get second chances on subs. Also - if you're planning on having an agent, you need to hold off subbing to publishers and let them do it. Nothing makes them more despondent than finding out you've already been subbing, because see first paragraph.


ETA: Oh and welcome to AW and congrats on finishing your first draft. Lots of people never get that far :)
Thank you for that. This is exactly why I am here. It's clear that I got too excited and started submitting too early. I didn't have much going for expectations in the first place, but this may end up in my "it's 3am and I can't sleep" regretful thoughts list.
 

mccardey

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Thank you for that. This is exactly why I am here. It's clear that I got too excited and started submitting too early. I didn't have much going for expectations in the first place, but this may end up in my "it's 3am and I can't sleep" regretful thoughts list.
I think we've all done it, or something similar :) It's fixable - just don't keep doing it.
 
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Nether

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I have read about the value of having an agent, which would work well for me since I am not skilled at selling myself or my writing, but I decided on trying to submit on my own after perusing the Writers Union of Canada website. They claim that there are only a few dozen literary agents in Canada, and that 80% of published authors in the country achieved this goal without an agent.

Publishing is a worldwide game, and a lot of Canadian authors have American agents. (And a lot of Brits have American agents, too, despite the UK's publishing industry being big.)

There's no reason to limit yourself to Canadian agents (that'd be like limiting yourself to Canadian publishers) and, honestly, unless an agent is physically near a publishing hub (like NYC), they may not have access to the same networks.

I do think that querying and submitting will be my greatest challenge, and that's if my writing is actually worth publishing, which I still am not sure of.

That's what critique partners, writers groups, and beta readers are for :p

As for the networking thing, I can't force myself to engage in it even in my regular job life. It just feels weird to try to use other people for one's own benefit when you don't really have anything to offer them in return. If I ever do get a legitimate offer though, I'm definitely going to say hi :)

Well, for starters, you can offer your friendship. You knew each other years ago, he might be interested in catching up.

And yeah, I had to cash out a little stock to pay for August, and I don't think management will let me do that again for at least a couple of years, so I do need to find a new strategy for writing while working. It just started to get frustrating, having to stop when I'd get myself into "the zone," you know?

It tends to be a lot easier when you establish routines.
 
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I guess I was just taking one of Heinlein's 5 Rules to heart; "You must refrain from rewriting, except to editorial order."
This is … astonishingly terrible advice, especially for a less experienced writer. Everyone’s process is different, but for me and a lot of other writers I know, revising is well more than half the work of writing. Indeed, for myself, it’s the most satisfying work—the part when I get to watch the half-baked raw material of a story take shape and begin to do some of the things I wanted it to do when I started it.

I’m really glad to hear that you’ve put the brakes on submitting and are going to give some thought to revision. And I’m glad you’re here—you will learn a lot about the craft of writing that will make your work better, and you will learn a lot about the industry that will increase your chances for success when you’re ready to share it with the world.

:e2coffee:
 
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Set2Stun

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This is … astonishingly terrible advice, especially for a less experienced writer. Everyone’s process is different, but for me and a lot of other writers I know, revising is well more than half the work of writing. Indeed, for myself, it’s the most satisfying work—the part when I get to watch the half-baked raw material of a story take shape and begin to do some of the things I wanted it to do when I started it.

I’m really glad to hear that you’ve put the brakes on submitting and are going to give some thought to revision. And I’m glad you’re here—you will learn a lot about the craft of writing that will make your work better, and you will learn a lot about the industry that will increase your chances for success when you’re ready to share it with the world.

:e2coffee:
Your thoughts are most welcome. I'm going to spend a few hours today reading some of the works and critiques from other members. Thanks, and nice to meet you !
 

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I guess I was just taking one of Heinlein's 5 Rules to heart; "You must refrain from rewriting, except to editorial order." It could be that this rule only really applies to someone who was a master like he was :D
Well, in a way, that's how it works. If you submit something to a publishing house, and the editor declines it with a form rejection letter, that can be taken as 'editorial order' that the piece in some way needs rewriting before it will be acceptable to that publisher.

It'd be nice to get more precise editorial feedback, but that rarely happens.
 
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mccardey

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Btw - I totally get your reluctance re the networking thing. Lots of people feel that publishing is a game of "who you know". It isn't. it's about writing good books and then targeting them to the very best person for them.
 

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Yeah I am really starting to see the importance of "finding the right fit" when it comes to who might be interested in publishing one's work. An agent's job is essentially to do just that, and agents also would be providing that valuable editorial feedback that Unimportant mentioned. I sure wish I joined up about a month earlier !
 

mccardey

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Yeah I am really starting to see the importance of "finding the right fit" when it comes to who might be interested in publishing one's work. An agent's job is essentially to do just that, and agents also would be providing that valuable editorial feedback that Unimportant mentioned. I sure wish I joined up about a month earlier !
It sounds like you'll want an editorially-minded agent, so target those. But do make sure you've got the piece shining to perfection before you approach one. In places like Canada and Australia - I'm guessing NZ as well - where agents are thin on the ground, you don't want to burn boats all over the place.

You also don't need to restrict yourself to a Canadian agent - but depending on what you write, an agent in-country might well have more of an ear for the nuance of your work. If you write nuanced work.

Good luck though. Enjoy the ride. Writing is such a privilege :)
 
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Set2Stun

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It sounds like you'll want an editorially-minded agent, so target those. But do make sure you've got the piece shining to perfection before you approach one. In places like Canada and Australia - I'm guessing NZ as well - where agents are thin on the ground, you don't want to burn boats all over the place.

You also don't need to restrict yourself to a Canadian agent - but depending on what you write, an agent in-country might well have more of an ear for the nuance of your work. If you write nuanced work.

Good luck though. Enjoy the ride. Writing is such a privilege :)
My naivety is showing again. I hadn't thought of approaching publishing as a global kind of thing. I just assumed that I'd be focusing on the Canadian market. Part of the rationale for this is that the government supports the creation of "Canadian content" in various ways. I just assumed that it would probably be impossible to break into the US market and that it'd be simpler if I focused on this niche. I have already learned quite a bit after only a few days here. Thanks again for your feedback !
 

mccardey

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My naivety is showing again. I hadn't thought of approaching publishing as a global kind of thing. I just assumed that I'd be focusing on the Canadian market. Part of the rationale for this is that the government supports the creation of "Canadian content" in various ways. I just assumed that it would probably be impossible to break into the US market and that it'd be simpler if I focused on this niche. I have already learned quite a bit after only a few days here. Thanks again for your feedback !
Those are both very salient points - and the US market, at the upper levels of agents and publishers, is very hard to break into even, I think, for people who live there.

Make sure you find and bookmark our Bewares and Recommendations pages. When you're ready, it's a good resource for checking potential agents and publishers.
 
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