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The Wild Rose Press / Wildflowers Books

editing_for_authors
Editing for authors: because every writer needs a good editor.

Ookiewookie

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I have a novella on sub with TWRP and was just notified that a senior editor passed it on for another editor to review. Not exactly sure what their review process is -- whether the S.E. read it and passed it on, or if she simply categorized it and shuffled it to the editor who does the reviews for my specific genre. Time will tell. Wish me luck?
 

RDHoward

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Just an update. I ended up going with a different publisher that more closely fit the needs and aims of the novel, but I'll definitely submit again to TWRP. It was still in the stages of being considered when I got this other offer, and their editors are nothing but wonderful and very on the ball. What a great publisher.
 

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I've spent a lot of time checking all the posts (it's become very quiet recently), while checking Submittable and my personal email like a mad woman, for the past six weeks. Sounds like everyone here is upbeat and positive and totally dedicated to the craft of writing. As we can all agree, it's never easy. In fact, it's probably up there in difficulty like designing a car. Finally, after a summer of being chained to my PC, I have good news to report - received "the email" from TWRP, have been offered a contract. I'm all fluttery with excitement. Here are my stats for those interested:


Query to Black Rose Line: 8/28
Response from TWRP Editor: 8/28 Please send manuscript, "sounds interesting"
Manuscript Sent: 8/29
*Time literally slowed down here at this point, as I waited for feedback or rejection: 6 weeeeeeks
Contract Offer from TWRP: 10/10

It may sound trite and old hat, but a long wait doesn't always (maybe not even usually) equate to a "No". Good luck and happy writing all!
 

Ookiewookie

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Waaaay back in the day when we thought nothing of hitchhiking we had a saying, "The longer the wait, the longer the ride". Maybe it wasn't exactly true, but it felt true.

Now, it seems the same when submitting my work to publishers. I hit "send," and then wait, wait, wait, and wait some more, hoping the long wait will equal a bigger, better, badder contract.
 

JohannaC

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I just signed a contract for book one of a series with TWRP and I'm very happy with them. I have a question. When should I send them the manuscripts for the next books in the series? Book 2 and 3 have not undergone critiques and editing to the extent of book 1 and I'm wondering if I should pay to have the next books edited, or go ahead and submit them to TWRP, where, if accepted, they will undergo the editing process. I'd like to get the series out there while there is momentum, but I don't want the books rejected if they aren't the very best they can be. Advice, please. I'm a first time author. Thanks!
 

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I just signed a contract for book one of a series with TWRP and I'm very happy with them. I have a question. When should I send them the manuscripts for the next books in the series? Book 2 and 3 have not undergone critiques and editing to the extent of book 1 and I'm wondering if I should pay to have the next books edited, or go ahead and submit them to TWRP, where, if accepted, they will undergo the editing process. I'd like to get the series out there while there is momentum, but I don't want the books rejected if they aren't the very best they can be. Advice, please. I'm a first time author. Thanks!

I wouldn't personally pay for editing the next books, but I would pay careful attention to the editing process for your contracted book with the TWRP editors, and apply the advice to your subsequent manuscripts. This will lessen the chance of them being rejected as a result. If they have enough confidence in your writing to accept your first book, you will likely have good results with the next books.

For the next few months, you will probably be concentrating on your current release, and you can always ask your editor when it is appropriate to send the next books in the series. I'd get this one in the bag, and then use your wait time to go over the next books in the series.
 

FiveForFlight

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I just signed a contract for book one of a series with TWRP and I'm very happy with them. I have a question. When should I send them the manuscripts for the next books in the series? Book 2 and 3 have not undergone critiques and editing to the extent of book 1 and I'm wondering if I should pay to have the next books edited, or go ahead and submit them to TWRP, where, if accepted, they will undergo the editing process. I'd like to get the series out there while there is momentum, but I don't want the books rejected if they aren't the very best they can be. Advice, please. I'm a first time author. Thanks!

Congrats Johanna! I'm in a similar position as you are. TWRP very recently contracted Book 1 of my 3 book series, which is due to release in 2016. I was ecstatic to be contracted but had no idea what about Book 2 or 3 and when it was appropriate to send it on to them. I finally, towards the end stage of edits of Book 1, offered to send her Book 2 of my series. My editor cheerfully responded with a "Yes, please send it on to me now." I hope this helps you! As Chumplet said, I also wouldn't pay for editing, no matter how professional. You may want to go to TWRP's critique page on Yahoo groups and have two sets of different but experienced eyes look over your manuscript, if you don't feel super confident with it. I think that if your writing for your first book was Class A enough for them to contract you, any small mistakes will be overlooked when they consider your no doubt great writing voice for your second book. They are very thorough about catching both glaring and small mistakes in the editing process, believe it! Best of luck to you in the Rose Garden!
 
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Cassie Knight

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I wouldn't personally pay for editing the next books, but I would pay careful attention to the editing process for your contracted book with the TWRP editors, and apply the advice to your subsequent manuscripts.

This, big time this. Having worked as an editor who acquires her work, I know I want to see that my authors learned something from the first book and even if you haven't gone all the way through a book with your editor, often a first round will show you the major stuff that needs attention so you can concentrate on that. I don't subscribe to the theory, as editor or author, that it's okay to sit back and not work as hard on sending in a polished 2nd or 3rd or... manuscripts as one does the first one. I've had many conversations like this with authors who thought they would just get accepted but found themselves either being rejected or doing a revise and resubmit.

And while it's tempting to hire someone, do the work yourself--you'll learn more. Seek help when you are stuck but try to do most of the work yourself.
 

gingerwoman

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I just signed a contract for book one of a series with TWRP and I'm very happy with them. I have a question. When should I send them the manuscripts for the next books in the series? Book 2 and 3 have not undergone critiques and editing to the extent of book 1 and I'm wondering if I should pay to have the next books edited, or go ahead and submit them to TWRP, where, if accepted, they will undergo the editing process. I'd like to get the series out there while there is momentum, but I don't want the books rejected if they aren't the very best they can be. Advice, please. I'm a first time author. Thanks!

Congrats on the sale.
 

TillysMom

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I sent a query on a romance novella for their "Sweetheart Line". The Senior Editor of that division asked to see the manuscript; however, I am not going to read too much into it. I love the story, but it's not very "sexy", it's more romantic, so I don't know if they'll see the value in it to publish.
I have sold stories to romance magazines, The "Trues", and a few flash fiction pieces; however, this is my first pitch for a longer work and I have in my head it will be rejected. I will be happily surprised if it isn't.
I write content articles for clients on a daily basis; however, I am not confident in my fiction writing skills.
I must say the editors at TWRP are polite, prompt and wonderful with quick replies. From my query, she noted what she liked about the premise, etc. but then again, that's a long way from a contract.
 

Brenda Hill

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I sent a query on a romance novella for their "Sweetheart Line". The Senior Editor of that division asked to see the manuscript; however, I am not going to read too much into it. /QUOTE]

As another writer who sent a query - to a different publisher - I'm hoping for the best for both of us. Good luck!
 

TillysMom

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Hi Everyone,

I am a little confused about TWRP. They are very nice in their e-mails, have author chats, a message board etc. however, I am still struggling with a clarification.
Does TWRP ask the authors to "invest" in their book like vanity pubs do? Do they offer a contract that has an assumption that the author will purchase promotional material to support the book? Are they traditional or a fancy way of self-pub or both?
I am trying to figure our how they make money. I read all of the posts and agree that TWRP are lovely folks but do they hit up the author for expenses to promote their work?
Thanks
 

Lauram6123

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Hi Everyone,

I am a little confused about TWRP. They are very nice in their e-mails, have author chats, a message board etc. however, I am still struggling with a clarification.
Does TWRP ask the authors to "invest" in their book like vanity pubs do? Do they offer a contract that has an assumption that the author will purchase promotional material to support the book? Are they traditional or a fancy way of self-pub or both?
I am trying to figure our how they make money. I read all of the posts and agree that TWRP are lovely folks but do they hit up the author for expenses to promote their work?
Thanks

TWRP is not a vanity publisher. I was never once asked for money. Ever. I signed my contract, worked with an editor, got cover art, etc and ended up being happy with my final product. You are not expected to buy a minimum number of books or purchase any promotional material.

All of my payments from them have been timely.

Hope some of that helps.
 

smlgr8

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Though I haven't published with them for years, they most definitely were not a vanity press. I never paid for anything ever.
 

TillysMom

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Thank you so much. I do appreciate the timely responses. I have a short novella (novelette) under consideration with them so I am trying to gather more info.
 

KrisA09

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What is the Fantasy Rose Press response time for partials?
 

maccarty

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Do you receive a response email after submitting to Wild Rose Press? And how long do you wait for a response to your query before you nudge for an update?
 

HaleeW

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I have a question about The Wild Rose Press contract terms. On the website, it states: "The Wild Rose Press, Inc. contract terms are for 5 years and renew yearly." What does that mean? After 5 years can I request my rights back? If it renews yearly then it seems that I'd never get the rights back. But I could be misinterpreting it. I hope I am. I have heard good things from several authors who have worked with this publisher.
 

Cassie Knight

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Hi Haylee,

My house's publishing contract says the same thing. What it means is that after 5 years, if you don't request your rights back, it renews under same terms and conditions. It will keep renewing every year unless you tell the publisher, usually with at least a 30 days notice, that you don't wish to renew. So if you want your rights back at the end of the five years, you'd want to note the date (sometimes the 5 year term starts at contract signing but most start from the time it's published, as in released to the world).

Hope that helps.
 

HaleeW

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Thank you, Cassiel! That explained everything. :)
I guess you really have to pay attention to the contract.
 

Vince524

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I got to pitch my MS directly to one of their editors at a conference this last February. She really liked it, recommended it to their committee and I just signed with them! I'm officially going to be a Wild Rose Press author!
 

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