The Old Neverending PublishAmerica Thread (Publish America)

editing_for_authors
Editing for authors: because every writer needs a good editor.

Status
Not open for further replies.

triceretops

Banned
Flounced
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
14,060
Reaction score
2,755
Location
In a van down by the river
Website
guerrillawarfareforwriters.blogspot.com
It is the quality of your writing, above all else, that has caused our royalty payments to add up to this astonishing amount.

Deliberately pandering to the vanity of an author. Which means send us your next masterpiece and be sure to have the credit card ready. Our operators are never asleep at the wheel...much like our edito...oops.

Bill Fields also said, "Never smarten up a chump."

Tri
 

Nexusman

Chaos Warrior
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 5, 2005
Messages
311
Reaction score
69
Location
The gap between dimensions
Website
nexusman.atspace.com
It is the quality of your writing, above all else, that has caused our royalty payments to add up to this astonishing amount.

As in, the quality of the writing of the press releases the author must do themselves, the quality of the writing the author does for advertisements, the quality of the writing to... etc

-Nick
 

triceretops

Banned
Flounced
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
14,060
Reaction score
2,755
Location
In a van down by the river
Website
guerrillawarfareforwriters.blogspot.com
PA

Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 17:07:07 -0500

Dear chump,

We have another milestone in our crosshairs: and we're targeting you, the author, and hope that you'll jump in the mud and wallow around with us on this.

Stop and imagine our lies for a moment: one million dollars that are finding their way to authors because you and your friends decided to buy and throw those books against the wall.

How rewarding is this?. It truly underscores what we have been saying all along: PublishAmerica is treating its authors disdainfully the old-fashioned way -- we bilk them, thanks to your legions of book buying family friends. We do not charge our authors a penny, ever. Instead, we catch them unawares at the rear door. A million dollars collectively! But there's no need to do the correct math on this--just think of the million bucks. That's what good old traditional publishing is all about. PublishAmerica is a young and ruthless company, we have barely begun to get our fangs into your necks and our hands on your cash. And already our royalties paid over our young lifetime are amounting to a pittance of what we really collected for ourselves.

Book sales have been going through the roof lately, (because they sure aren't on the shelves) but not in anyway part as a result of our decision last year to make our titles returnable. Bookstore orders have doubled in the past few months, because we've had a rash of second book submissions and the checks on those have cleared, even in the famously slow first half of January, with bookstores ordering a PublishAmerica book every three minutes, day and night, seven days a week, but don't check these figures since you'll be quite pleased that we've had this verified by an authorized source.

More than anything else, this is your last gasp and you'll soon be banned or leaving us. You and your fellow PublishAmerica authors have written these books that you have purchased for your private sales campaign that lets us off the marketing hook. It is the quality of your writing, that has been your own downfall, that has caused our royalty payments to add up to this astonishing amount because you were inclined to buy your own books since they couldn't be found in any sales medium.

In the last week of next month we will be putting increasingly smaller royalty statements and checks in the mail. To celebrate the million-dollar milestone, we are making a rare exception by presenting an unusual offer to those who, under Pars. 5 and 10 of their contract, who feel PA peer presured into ordering hundreds of copies of their own book in the last week of January. Feel free to imagine that you are taking advantage of us and we are tanking big time on this offer.

Do not buy any books that you don't need or want in order to become a celebrity author. PublishAmerica authors are under no obligation whatsoever to buy their own books, in any way, at any time, but they are doing it in record numbers--not as of late--that's why we're doing this, cause we're hittin' some pot holes lately. However, some of you prefer to keep hundreds of copies of their own book on hand, and though we rarely if ever pay royalties and we hope you don't investigate us like Dolan, this celebratory offer is for those promotional suckers among you who fall under that massive steam roller that is PA.

So here goes: (ready set go?)

On all orders of 60 or more copies bought by the author, we will allow a 45 pct discount, plus we will pay royalties on those books! Which is enough to buy a cheap pack of cigs or a gallon of gas. These royalties will be included in February's check, we hope, if we receive enough of your purchases, or we might have to carry it over to the next royalty period because of situations beyond our control. Damn that Dolan!

Phone orders only, at 301 695 1707, full-color books are excluded, offer expires January 31 and so will your board privileges if we find that you haven't met your purchasing quota lately.

Congratulations, and thank you, chump,

PublishAmerica Author Support Us with Every Dime you have to Get Us Out of the Hole We've Dug for Ourselves.
 

egem

Yeah, I suck at math, but can't someone do the calc here? Please? I have 2 questions. 1. How much does that break down to in per author sale 2. How much does this suggest the company has sold based on what non-authors have bought?
 

Sage

The Answer to Life, the Universe, & Everything
Staff member
Moderator
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Oct 15, 2005
Messages
61,597
Reaction score
12,345
Age
42
Location
Cheering you all on!
egem said:
Yeah, I suck at math, but can't someone do the calc here? Please? I have 2 questions. 1. How much does that break down to in per author sale 2. How much does this suggest the company has sold based on what non-authors have bought?
1. One million dollars paid and 17,000 authors means an average of $58.80 per author.

2. I'm not that smart (I forget how much each author gets %age-wise per book), but someone already calculated it on the previous page, I think.
 

egem

Sage said:
1. One million dollars paid and 17,000 authors means an average of $58.80 per author.

2. I'm not that smart (I forget how much each author gets %age-wise per book), but someone already calculated it on the previous page, I think.

I may be backwards, but I think this means that the company has to have made, at very least 12.5 million on just sales that paid to authors (if the 1,000,000 was paid to authors).
 

James D. Macdonald

Your Genial Uncle
Absolute Sage
VPX
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
25,582
Reaction score
3,781
Location
New Hampshire
Website
madhousemanor.wordpress.com
For White Raven

For White Raven (or one of our other PA lurkers):

I was alerted to this thread on the PAMB by a posting down in the overflow thread:

http://bb.publishamerica.com/viewtopic.php?p=122375

Could you please whisper to that author that The Screenplay Agency is a total scam, that they've never sold anything to anyone in their lives, and any money the author sends to them (or one of their "sister companies") will be completely wasted?

Thanks.

See also:
http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20359
 
Last edited:

TwentyFour

practical experience, FTW
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 22, 2005
Messages
1,135
Reaction score
299
James D. Macdonald said:
For White Raven (or one of our other PA lurkers):

I was alerted to this thread on the PAMB by a posting down in the overflow thread:

http://bb.publishamerica.com/viewtopic.php?p=122375

Could you please whisper to that author that The Screenplay Agency is a total scam, that they've never sold anything to anyone in their lives, and any money the author sends to them (or one of their "sister companies") will be completely wasted?

Thanks.

See also:
http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20359

I posted this on a PA authors forum to tell him/her.
 

LloydBrown

Super Member
Registered
Joined
Jun 3, 2005
Messages
1,749
Reaction score
196
Location
Jacksonville, Florida
Website
www.lloydwrites.com
I'm working on a tabular comparison between PA & other publishing options. Here are my categories so far

Advance
Copyright registration
Author's ability to examine sales records
Royalty period
Bookstore distribution
Discount to retailers
Return policy
Reseller catalog
Sales calls to resellers
Author marketing support
Pricing Strategy
Binding & production quality
Cover art
Copy editing
Content editing
Permissions for copyrighted material
Strength of credit toward next publication
and
Author's efforts sell (as a % of total sales)

What other considerations should I include?
 

TwentyFour

practical experience, FTW
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 22, 2005
Messages
1,135
Reaction score
299
The Publishers ability to deal with authors, when questions are asked...how well they answer and with what "tone". How easily it is to buy the books or order them.
 

spike

Mostly Ignored
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 10, 2005
Messages
1,100
Reaction score
151
Location
Bath, Pennsylvania
Website
oddgoose.blogspot.com
LloydBrown said:
I'm working on a tabular comparison between PA & other publishing options. Here are my categories so far

Advance
Copyright registration
Author's ability to examine sales records
Royalty period
Bookstore distribution
Discount to retailers
Return policy
Reseller catalog
Sales calls to resellers
Author marketing support
Pricing Strategy
Binding & production quality
Cover art
Copy editing
Content editing
Permissions for copyrighted material
Strength of credit toward next publication
and
Author's efforts sell (as a % of total sales)

What other considerations should I include?

Distribution
Catalogue
 

James D. Macdonald

Your Genial Uncle
Absolute Sage
VPX
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
25,582
Reaction score
3,781
Location
New Hampshire
Website
madhousemanor.wordpress.com
Last edited:

DeePower

Comparison of PA and traditional?commercial publisher



A Comparison of Traditional/Commercial Publishers
and PublishAmerica/Vanity/subsidy Publishers
By Dee Power
Manuscript Selection, Royalties and Contracts


Traditional Publishers (TP) accept a very small percentage of unsolicited manuscripts, 1% or less. Most TP, with the exception of the small presses, do not accept unsolicited manuscripts from writers directly but only from literary agents. The literary agents act as a screening device to sift out the acceptable manuscripts from the dregs.



Publish America (PA) and other vanity/subsidy publishers accept nearly every manuscript submitted to them. There are documented cases of PA offering contracts on manuscripts containing gibberish, manuscripts that change characters in the middle, and manuscripts which repeat a series of the same pages over and over.



Miranda Prather, Executive Director of PublishAmerica claims that PublishAmerica rejects 80%, San Antonio Current June 24, 2004) of the manuscripts presented to them. In an email they have said “We read every single submission before we accept or refuse.”



If PA releases 5000 titles per year, as they are on track to do in 2005, then 25,000 manuscripts were submitted to them. PA has approximately 100 employees, each employee would have to read one manuscript each working day in addition to their other job responsibilities. Very, very few people can read an entire book in one day.



The majority of TP authors have been previously published



Very few authors with PA have been previously published.



All of the titles of TP are expected to have sales. Unless for some reason the title is pulled, for example after 9/11 several novels involving hijacking and terrorists were pulled from release, as was at least one movie. All of the titles have some level of sales.



PA has 1000 titles which have had no sales. 10% of the titles released by PA have not sold one copy.



The number of titles released per year by a TP depends upon the publisher. However Random House, one of the largest publishers in the United States released 3000 titles in 2003. AuthorsHouse, a vanity press, released 500 titles a month or close to 6000 titles.



PA is on track to release 5000 titles in 2005 with a tiny fraction of the resources of Random House. The PA staff is about half that of AuthorsHouse.



The TP buys the rights to publish the title from the author in exchange for money. Usually the rights are bought for a percentage of the revenues the sale of the title generates or these are called royalties.



An advance is simply a prepayment of royalties that the TP believes the title will earn. For example if the TP calculates that the title will sell 5000 copies at a retail price of $20.00, and the author’s royalty is 10% of the retail price, the advance could be as much as $10,000.00.



Once the author delivers the manuscript to the TP and the manuscript is accepted, the advance does not have to be paid back. If the publisher decides for whatever reason not to publish the title, the author does not have to pay the advance back.



PA pays a symbolic $1 advance.



Royalties are also paid on other rights: first syndication rights (an excerpt printed in Sports Illustrated Magazine for example prior to publication), sale of foreign rights ( a French publisher buys the rights to print the book in French), film and TV rights, audio book rights, and in the case of hardcover books, the mass market rights aka paperback rights. TP make active efforts to sell these other rights as they can significantly increase the revenues generated from a title.



PA has sold the foreign rights of less than 10 titles out of the over 10,000 books they have released. No film rights, audio rights or any other rights have been sold or at least announced.



Most TP include a clause in the publishing contract with the author, which allows the author to examine the records of the publisher to determine if royalties are paid correctly. Since the calculation of royalties can be complicated the author usually appoints a professional CPA, or audit firm to do the examination.



PA has refused to allow authors to be represented by professionals when exercising the audit clause in their contract.



Editing and Production



TP edit manuscripts carefully both for content, structure, and copy editing ie., grammar, syntax, spelling and punctuation. A 90,000 word book requires 30 to 40 hours of copy editing. It is a reflection on the publisher’s carelessness if errors are found in a published work.



PA has approximately 30 editors who provided editing services. They claim to edit only on grammar, syntax, spelling and punctuation. They say they correct 35000 of these types of errors each day. However at the rate of current publication, each editor would have to edit a book every 2 days (in addition to reading a manuscript every day).



PA now has the option of no editing that the author can select. The book is published without editing and a note on the copyright page states that no editing has been done.



Marketing and Sales



There were 190,000 new titles published in the United States in 2004. About half of these are never meant for retail sale, they are textbooks, technical manuals, in house corporate publications, medical manuals and such.



TP books qualify for and have a library of congress catalog description. This description means that libraries can easily order and catalog books.



PA books do not qualify for the library of congress description as the LOC has determined that PA is a publish on demand publisher.



TP compile a catalog of their titles in the upcoming 3 to 6 months. The catalog has the cover of the new titles, a brief description, and a short author’s bio. Marketing plans such as advertising, book tours and the initial print run are included for each title as well. The catalog is distributed to independent bookstores, chain store buyers and wholesalers to the grocery stores, drug stores, the warehouse super stores and the airport locations.



PA has no catalog.



The TP has sales representatives or an in house sales force which follows up on the catalog with the buyers. The chain stores such as Barnes and Noble, Borders and BooksAMillion have buyers which specialize in the different areas, ie fiction, nonfiction, self-help, etc. The sales reps meet with the buyers to help them select the titles and the number of copies they wish to order. The sales reps also meet with the larger independent bookstores. The buyers select the titles based on the previous sales record of the author or like titles.



Local managers of the chains and independent bookstores may order a copy or two of a local author if the author is persistent. Authors may also convince a local bookstore to stock a book on consignment, meaning that the author pays the publisher for the book, gives the book to the store for placement and only gets paid by the store if the book sells. Consignment is virtually the only way a PA book gets on bookstore shelves and then only rarely.



PA has no sales rep and no in house sales force.



TP offer standard trade discounts.



Bookstores require a 40 to 50% discount from the retail price, the distributor from 10 to 15% and the wholesaler 10 to 15%. Even amazon requires a 55% discount. In actuality the publisher only receives from 30 to 40% of the retail price, and usually closer to 30%.



For example if the retail price of a book is $20.00, the bookstore makes $8.00, the wholesaler $3.00 and the distributor $3.00, the publisher receives $6.00.



The publisher has to pay the printer for the book, which depending on the number of pages in the book, format, and size of the print run, can range from less than dollar to $5.00 or so. In this case we'll use $2.00 as the printing cost. The publisher also has to pay royalties to the author and shipping costs from the printer to the distributor and then to the retailer. Royalties also range but in this case we'll use 10% of the net price the publisher receives ($6.00) as the royalty due to the author, or $.60. The shipping is about $.20 each time the book is shipped, so $.40. That adds up to $3.00 of expenses for each book for a profit to the publisher of $3.00 per book.



To review- for each book sold at retail for $20.00. The bookstore gets $8.00, the distributor $3.00, the wholesaler $3.00, the printer $2.00, the shipper $.40, the author $.60 and the publisher $3.00.



PA offers a non standard discount of only 40% to be split between the retail store, the wholesaler and the distributor. PA makes $12.00 per book.



Bookstores do not want to order books that are not returnable to the publisher if they don’t sell. Of the 90,000 new titles each year a buyer can not possibly even be vaguely familiar with each title. If a title doesn’t sell the bookstore requires the option of being able to return it to the publisher or to the wholesaler. Bookstores, both chain and independent are very hesitant and most won’t order books they can’t return.



PA has offered a 5 to 20% on titles that are returnable. PA says that only titles sold through Ingram are returnable. There has been some discussion that Ingram no longer handles PA titles but passes the ordering on to Lightning Source, their subsidiary. This means that in reality PA books are not returnable.



TP offer 90 day payment terms to the bookstore.



PA requires payment upfront when the book is ordered.



TP books usually have a national sales rep to work with the major chains.



PA has no national sales rep.



Barnes and Noble will not stock PA books as a matter of policy because of poor quality, high prices and non returnability. This has been documented in writing. WalMart will not stock PA books because Anderson Merchandising the distributor for WalMart will not carry them.



TP books have the retail price printed on the book and/or imbedded in the barcode.



PA books do not have the retail price printed on them or imbedded in the barcode. In statements to its own authors, PA has made the statement that the author and the title are designated in the ISBN. This is not true. The first number in the ISBN, the second series is the publisher’s number, the third is the number of that title in the series of the publisher (ie it’s the first book of the publishers or the 51st) the last digits are check digits.



The number of titles released per year by a TP depends upon the publisher. However Random House, one of the largest publishers in the United States released 3000 titles in 2003 and spent $100,000,000 on marketing, that’s an average of $33,000 per title.



PA is on track to release 5000 titles in 2005,even if they took every dollar of their $4 million of sales and used it for marketing that would be less than $1000 per title.



Promotion



TP send review copies to the media, newspaper book editors, radio stations, whomever they believe will review the book and spread the word. There is no hard and fast rule, but it would be reasonable to say the TP distribute 100 review copies. TP also distribute a press release when the book is released and available in stores for sale.



PA sends two review copies and only if they approve of the reviewer. PA sends out one press release to one newspaper of the author’s choice when the author signs the contract.



TP books are reviewed by major newspapers and local media if there is interest in the book.



Many newspapers including the New York Times, and the Washington Post have policies against reviewing PA books. Smaller publications do not review PA books as policy as well. PA books are not stocked in bookstores so reviewers don’t want to waste space in their publication reviewing a book the readers can’t find.



TP advertise their books in trade publications that are distributed to booksellers and librarians.



No trade advertising is done by PA.



Advertising to consumers is not often done by TP, but when it is, it focuses on selling the titles.



PA advertises constantly on the Internet and all the advertising is targeted to recruit writers who want to be published, rather than on the books it has published.



TP attend major trade shows and bookseller conventions and conferences. TP take orders for their books from the attendees of these conferences.



PA has not attended any major trade show in the past two years. They have not attended BookExpo America, the American Library Conference, or any bookseller conventions.



Business Models



The business model of a TP is to sell books to libraries, bookstores and other retail outlets for consumers to purchase. About 60% of books meant for retail sale are sold in bookstores, about 10% online (amazon etc.,) and the remainder in grocery stores, airport stores, drug stores and warehouse super stores (Target, K-mart, WalMart).



PA business model is to sell books to the authors not to bookstores or to consumers directly. At least half of the books sold by PA are sold to their own authors.



TP offer discounts to their authors when they buy their own books, but it is a courtesy. Often TP will give the author copies at no charge if they’re going to be used for promotional purposes.



PA’s business model depends on authors buying their own books. On a regular basis PA emails authors promotional messages that urge them to buy their own books. While the author isn’t required contractually to buy their own books, PA’s profitability depends on it. PA says 300 times a day a bookstore orders a PA book. That means that about 76,500 copies sold through bookstores. PA has released about 4000 titles so far this year so that means an average of 14 copies sold in bookstores. Not 14 copies per bookstore but 14 copies combined for all the bookstores in the United States.



If 76,500 copies sold to bookstores at the full 40% discount that PA offers and the average retail price of a PA book is $19.95 then a little less than $1 million dollars of the $4 million dollars of revenues PA generates for the year is from bookstore sales. The majority of revenues come from authors purchasing their own books from PA.



TP books are available in bookstores. When a product is designated as available in a store, common usage means that the product is stocked and available for immediate purchase. An example would be “As seen on TV and now available at your local drugstore.”



When PA says that PA books are available in bookstores, they mean that the book is available for a customer to order, pay for and then wait for the book to be delivered to the store, or in most cases delivered to the customer’s home address. PA books are not stocked regularly by bookstores. PA titles are not available at grocery stores, drug stores or superstores.



TP have print runs from 1000 copies upwards to 500,000 copies for the bestsellers. Small presses may print smaller runs using digital printing. The average print run for a first novel is about 5000 copies. The books are warehoused by the publisher until sold to Ingram (wholesaler). The books are then warehoused by Ingram until sold to bookstores.



PA doesn’t have print runs. The books are printed as they are sold using the print on demand technology. Print on Demand technology means that books can be printed one at a time. No books are warehoused by PA. Very few if any PA books are warehoused by Ingram, the wholesaler.



TP have a cost of about $2.15 for a 2000 print run for a trade paperback book. The average price for a fiction trade paperback book is around $15.00.



PA has a cost of about $5.00 for print on demand for each copy. The average price is $20.00.



TP can fill orders the same day as the books are ordered.



PA books have a 4 to 8 day waiting period until they can be printed, that’s the lag from the POD printer. PA has a 3 to 4 week delivery time if books are ordered from their website.



TP books are discounted by 30% on the amazon.com website.



Very, very few PA books are discounted on amazon.com.
 

BeeBomb

Super Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 29, 2005
Messages
130
Reaction score
39
Horse-pee-okky or chicken-poo. Why in pea picken, hog slop would a PA (author SIC) buy 60 copies of a single book (sometimes more books for others) at a 45% discount + shipping (can't forget shipping cause it tallies the book price back to the original price) when ya cain't give th' damned things away?

WHY? Cause they are banking on those authors to buy the danged things, at the ridiculous volume, so they can have a good laugh at those who can't calculate.
Tsk, tsk, tsk...what goes around comes around and when 17,000 authors figure out they have been rued, tattooed, and screwed out of hard earned money...PA's gonna use it to say, "We didn't promise you a rose garden, but here, hehehehe, snicker, snicker, you can have the thorns."

GIVE ME A BREAK!

Bee
 

ResearchGuy

Resident Curmudgeon
Requiescat In Pace
Registered
Joined
Mar 26, 2005
Messages
5,011
Reaction score
696
Location
Sacramento area, CA
Website
www.umbachconsulting.com
BeeBomb said:
Horse-pee-okky or chicken-poo. Why in pea picken, hog slop would a PA (author SIC) buy 60 copies of a single book (sometimes more books for others) at a 45% discount + shipping (can't forget shipping cause it tallies the book price back to the original price) when ya cain't give th' damned things away?...
Because hope springs eternal?

Why do people buy lottery tickets? Because buying a ticket increases their chance of winning from absolutely none to something very tiny. In percentage terms, it is a huge improvement in the chance. Anyway someone wins, sooner or later, so folks can believe it might be themselves. (Even I buy a lottery ticket a few times a year on that theory. Worth a shot. And the dollar buys a day or two of daydreaming about hitting the jackpot.)

Folks who have been served up nothing but creampuff 'reviews' and malarky about selectivity and giving their book "the chance it deserves" are under an illusion. Add to that a lack of understanding about the book trade, and there you go.

In fairness, some PA authors (and some other POD authors) do meet their modest expectations by reselling their own books. But that is the key: modest (and local) expectations. Set the bar low enough and it is easy to jump over.

--Ken
 

AnnaWhite

VPX
Super Member
Registered
Joined
May 12, 2005
Messages
228
Reaction score
71
Website
www.wizardessbooks.com
James D. Macdonald said:
Divided by six years. A bit over $2 million a year. Larry says PA does $4-6 million in sales per year.

So ... who bought those other books? Answer: the authors themselves.
Exactly.

Let's not forget that the bulk of PA sales (and profits) comes from selling books to the authors at special discounts. Normally, no royalties are paid for these books.

According to my calculations:

I received about $50 in royalties (a little less than average) on 43 books sold. On these, PA made a clean profit of $422 approx.

I bought 100 copies of my book (at 50% discount), for which I received no royalties. It cost me just over $1,000. On these, I estimate that PA's clean profit, after printing expenses and overheads, was around $759.

If I'm an average case, PA has made a clean profit of around $17,000,000 on its 17,000 authors. Note: a clean profit, after paying all expenses. $17,000,000 is the money that has gone into the pockets of PA's owners. Well, I guess helicopters are expensive...

How many more would-be-authors are going to line PA's pockets? How many more are prepared to talk their family and friends into buying overpriced books in order to line PA's pockets?
 

Sparhawk

Jenna's Cabana Boy
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 18, 2005
Messages
1,071
Reaction score
450
Location
in the state of Delusion
Dee, dang that was AWESOME

Dee, :Hail:

That was an incredibly succinct and information packed read. (If that means anything coming from me)

Thanks for posting it. What a condemnation for Publish America as a "Legitimate" publisher.

I feel so sorry for any of those "Promotional" Tigers who are about to get defanged and declawed when they try and sell their 60 books. <<Heavy Sigh>>
 

BeeBomb

Super Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 29, 2005
Messages
130
Reaction score
39
Nah, it isn't hope springs eternal...it's the bed springs whacking the daylights of the angle of what is caught. In this instance (to quote a favorite person on this board)...th' honeymoon dun sprung th' leak!

I am one of the most optimistic people ever putting my lily whites in warm fuzzies. I used to be (USED TO BE) a staunch supporter of PA. UNTIL--> my roylaties looked like 2 piss holes in a pile of sand...WHEN...I knew, from talking to area citizens and signing copies of books sold, somethin' wuz smellin' eau`d peppyd'poo. THEN...when everything I had to say on the PAMB was snatched like a fast running thief sucking wind plowin' down mailboxes and THEN...when my password said, "Who?"...I knew when I keyed in my name and it said, "Nope"...........Boy, Hunny...I knowed it, I knowed it...th' bread dun went stale!

I have a better chance of standing in a driving hail storm, batting lightening bolts with a tennis racquet than buying my own books. Give me a lottery ticket any day of the week...my chances are better.


BeeBomb
 

Sootie

Banned
Joined
Jan 18, 2006
Messages
83
Reaction score
17
Location
Ontario, Canada
Website
p105.ezboard.com
PA

:poke:
Bee said: I am one of the most optimistic people ever putting my lily whites in warm fuzzies. I used to be (USED TO BE) a staunch supporter of PA.
Bee we all were. Hell, I was called the queen of the PAMB. But it doesn`t take very long after your book is printed before you start hearing the death march.

Sootie. :e2violin:
 

BeeBomb

Super Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 29, 2005
Messages
130
Reaction score
39
Sootie said:
:poke:
Bee we all were. Hell, I was called the queen of the PAMB. But it doesn`t take very long after your book is printed before you start hearing the death march.

Sootie. :e2violin:

Hi ya Sootie! Ah, you're still the queen. The reason we got the...dumdedumdum...dumdedumdum...dum...is because we heard...dang me, dang me, you ought to take a rope and hang me...high in the highest tree, cause lordy, it's all what you did to me! The waltz turned into the Nutcracker.


Bee
 

Kevin Yarbrough

Will write for peace of mind
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Feb 15, 2005
Messages
1,249
Reaction score
415
Location
Hiding. Try and find me.
Sootie, I didn't hear the death march, I felt the literary ferry man wack me with his pole as he came ashore looking for more books to take to the land of the literary dead.
 

James D. Macdonald

Your Genial Uncle
Absolute Sage
VPX
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
25,582
Reaction score
3,781
Location
New Hampshire
Website
madhousemanor.wordpress.com
Let's make one thing clear: I'm not against publishers making money. Tons of money. Heaps of it. I presume all of my publishers make a profit on my books. That keeps everyone happy.

What I object to is authors buying their own books for resale as the business model of the publisher.

Or, actually, I don't even object to that: If the vanity press didn't exist we'd have to invent it.

What I object to is authors buying their own books for resale as the business model of the publisher, and the publisher lying about it. I object to false and misleading advertising.
 

Bonnie Gibson

Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
127
Reaction score
41
Location
Alabama
Once More

PA has made me sick to my stomach. I just wish they'd quit sending me emails.
The bad thing is... some will believe every word of it.

Jim, I remember last year this time. They put up a sale to the authors and didn't pay the royalties they said they would. Something about the credit card companies not getting the money in on time. Any excuse will do for them. They'll do it again this year, after all, it worked last year.

All PA books that I can see are only 5% discounted if they are returnable. Heck, mine isn't returnable yet and it's still 5% discounted.

I try not to even think PA anymore. Messes up my day. I got the email and decided to come in and see what was being said about it.

Back to the bookstore.
Bonnie
 
Status
Not open for further replies.