The 2021 AW Reading Challenge! New Year; New Hope; New List.

editing_for_authors
Editing for authors: because every writer needs a good editor.

Chris P

Likes metaphors mixed, not stirred
Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 4, 2009
Messages
19,278
Reaction score
2,892
Location
Vienna, VA
Welcome back Reading Challenge alums, and welcome all new comers! As we enter this year with hope on the horizon, see if you can get out of your comfort zone, tackle a new vista, turn a new page, do something DARING! Book-wise, at least.


HOW IT WORKS: Each us chooses 12 books, each one fitting one of the categories below of our choosing to read and discuss throughout the year. We each read our own 12, unless you have titles in common with another reader and want to discuss; that’s cool when that happens.


WINNING: No matter if you finish all 12, finish 12 and add extra credit later, or don’t quite finish your 12, it’s all good. You’re a winner at this if you declare yourself so.


RULES: Have fun. That is all.


SPOILERS: Please read the sticky in this forum regarding spoilers [okay, so a teensie bit of a suggestion, if not a rule as such].



THE LIST (the part you were waiting for):



  1. Year of the Ox: 2021 is the year of the Ox in the Chinese Zodiac. Choose a book published in any year of the Ox: 2021, 2009, 1997, 1985, 1973, . . . (keep subtracting by 12 to go earlier).
  2. It’s all fun and games: A book about games, gambling, or gamers in some way.
  3. Let’s go clubbing!: A book in a celebrity’s book club (from such as, but doesn’t have to be: https://bookriot.com/celebrity-book-clubs/)
  4. No Cliff Notes this time: A book that’s required reading in most high schools or universities.
  5. Laughing Matters: A humorous or satirical book.
  6. The Other Side: A book about or taking place in the afterlife.
  7. Out of Time: A book involving time travel.
  8. Girls chase boys chase girls (or any combination thereof): A book with a love triangle.
  9. Waxing lyrical: A book with the same title as a popular song (or well-known lyric).
  10. 21st Century, 21st Year, 21st Letter: A book by someone whose first or last name begins with the letter U.
  11. Dearly Departed: A book by an author who died within the past four years.
  12. I spy: A book featuring spies or espionage.
  13. Holiday cheer: A book focusing on a holiday.
  14. Better known for . . .: A book by someone who’s famous for something other than writing.
  15. That old black magic: A paranormal novel.
  16. East meets West: A book taking place in Asia (Turkey to Japan, Siberia to Vietnam).
  17. Family drama: A book following three or more generations of a family.
  18. Best friend: A book with a dog on the cover.
  19. Another’s Mother Tongue: Any book in the foreign language of your choice.
  20. Alma mater matters: A book about or taking place at a school, college or university.
  21. Keep up with the Joneses: A book everyone else seems to have read but you have not.
  22. Tag team: A book by more than one author.
  23. Ye olde booke shoppe: A book written before 1800.
  24. Read it again, Sam: Reread a book you have already read.
  25. Local hero: A book by a local author.
  26. Locked up: A book taking place in a prison, mental institution or treatment center.
  27. Succinct: A book with a one-word title.
  28. Matryoshka books: A book mentioned or discussed inside another book.
  29. What you read: A book you loved as a child.
  30. I’ve met them!: A book by someone you have seen in person (either know, seen at a book fair, heard at a speaking engagement, in line at the ATM, whatever).
  31. Howdy, stranger: A book about immigrants or immigration, or with an immigrant main character.
  32. Verboten: A banned book.
  33. What your parents read: Any novel from the year you were born.
  34. Not available in stores: Beta read someone’s unpublished work.
  35. After the fall: A post-apocalyptic or dystopic book.
  36. Bits and pieces: An anthology (poetry, short stories, whatever).
  37. Out of this world: A book taking place in space or on another planet.
  38. Freebies: A book you (legally) obtained without paying for.
  39. Face your fears: A book that intimidates you, for any reason.
  40. Namesakes: A book by an author who shares your first or last name.
  41. Holy moly some authors like to use an awful lot of words: A book whose title is more than six words long.
  42. Lol random: Go to Gutenberg.org, click “Book Search,” click “Random” and pick any of the books that show up. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/search/?sort_order=random Hit “refresh” for a new list if none of these grab you.
  43. Out of the park on first at-bat: A debut.
  44. Epic Odyssey: Read an epic poem (or any poem more than 25 pages long).
  45. Feisty feline fiesta: A book with a cat on the cover.
  46. Pixies and Dryads and Elves, oh my!: A high fantasy.
  47. Run for the border: A book about or taking place in Central or South America.
  48. How we got to where we are: A book about the politics of your country (history or current events, but published in the last 5 years).
  49. Vast critical acclaim: A book that has won a prestigious award.
  50. Like a novel, only real: Creative nonfiction.
 

mrsmig

Write. Write. Writey Write Write.
Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Jul 4, 2012
Messages
7,081
Reaction score
1,738
Location
Virginia
Oooo, some nice new categories! Time to get to work on assembling my list...
 

Chris P

Likes metaphors mixed, not stirred
Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 4, 2009
Messages
19,278
Reaction score
2,892
Location
Vienna, VA
I had a lot more genre come up this year; that's the way the random number generator bounces, I guess. Not at all a bad thing, of course!

One big change I'm making this year to my selections is I'm ONLY going to read books I check out from my local library. After years of offering verbal (and very little actual) support, last year I finally got an account just a couple weeks before everything locked down. I've been checking out ebooks, even though they did start curbside book pick-up in the summer. Without people actually checking out books, it's hard for them to say how much support they actually have. I had to swap out a couple titles I was interested in, as the wait lists had several hundred people in line. That's a good problem to have, though.




  1. Laughing Matters: A humorous or satirical book. Nothing to see here – Kevin Wilson
  2. I spy: A book featuring spies or espionage. Need to know – Karen Cleveland
  3. Local hero: A book by a local author. First cosmic velocity – Zack Powers
  4. 21[SUP]st[/SUP] Year, 21[SUP]st[/SUP] Letter: A book by someone whose first or last name begins with the letter U House of Broken Angels – Luis Alberto Urrea
  5. Locked up: A book taking place in a prison, mental institution or treatment center. What She Left Behind – Ellen Marie Wiseman
  6. What your parents read: Any novel from the year you were born. Love in the Ruins – Walker Percy
  7. Out of this world: A book taking place in space or on another planet. Artemis – Andy Weir
  8. Keep up with the Joneses: A book everyone else seems to have read but you have not. The Book Thief – Markus Zusak
  9. Feisty feline fiesta: A book with a cat on the cover. Cat Chaser – Elmore Leonard
  10. Pixies and Dryads and Elves, oh my!: A high fantasy. Spinning Silver – Naomi Novik
  11. Run for the border: A book about or taking place in Central or South America. 100 years of solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  12. Vast critical acclaim: A book that has won a prestigious award. Discomfort of Evening – Marieke Lucas Rijneveld (Man Booker International award).
 

Verboten

Super Member
Registered
Joined
Apr 25, 2018
Messages
118
Reaction score
15
Location
Midwest
Here's my list:

1. Verboten: Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
2. Pixies and Dryads and Elves, oh my!: Wizards First Rule by Terry Goodkind
3. Face Your Fears:: Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
4. After The Fall: The Stand by Stephen King
5. What your parents read: A Scanner Darkly by Phillip K. Dick
6. Tag Team: Brimstone by Preston & Child
7. Out of the park on first at-bat: The Poppy War by R.F. Kuang
8. Freebies: Tombland by C.J. Sansom
9. Holy moly some authors like to use an awful lot of words: The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman
10. Run for the border: House of Spirits by Isabel Allende
11.Out of this world: Dune by Frank Herbert
12. Creative nonfiction: In Cold Blood by Truman Capote
 

Chris P

Likes metaphors mixed, not stirred
Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 4, 2009
Messages
19,278
Reaction score
2,892
Location
Vienna, VA
Verboten, I wondered if you would pick the "verboten" category :) Lolita is one of my all-time favs, BTW. Tale of Two Cities kept coming up when I was looking for my "locked up" books, and it intimidated me too which is why I looked for something else. I'll be interested to hear what you think. I read David Copperfield last year, and was highly impressed.
 

Verboten

Super Member
Registered
Joined
Apr 25, 2018
Messages
118
Reaction score
15
Location
Midwest
Haha! I had too! I've been wanting to read Lolita forever, just have never picked it up. I actually almost picked 100 Years of Solitude. Looking forward to your thoughts!
 

druid12000

You're out of your tree...
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Jul 23, 2011
Messages
7,213
Reaction score
506
Location
The dark side of the moon, making sinister plans..
I'll post my full list when it's complete, I have 8 out of 12 chosen but already started on book 1 (Laughing Matters ~ 'Noir' by Christopher Moore) before bed last night/this morning.

Verboten: I'll be interested to hear your take on 'A Scanner Darkly'! I'm a big fan of Phillip K. Dick and that one is dear to my heart.
 

Brightdreamer

Just Another Lazy Perfectionist
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Apr 22, 2012
Messages
9,214
Reaction score
1,434
Location
USA
Website
brightdreamersbookreviews.blogspot.com
Got most of a list together, subject to change:

1 - Year of the Ox: Across the Green Grass Fields, by Seanan McGuire (may swap for Leviathan Falls, by James S. A. Corey)
2 - Freebies: Riot Baby, by Tochi Onyebuchi (may swap for Silver in the Wood, by Emily Tesh - both obtained through Tor's ebook-of-the-month club)
3 - The Other Side: The Girl in the Green Silk Gown, by Seanan McGuire
4 - Out of the park on first at-bat: Raybearer, by Jordan Ifueko
5 - Waxing lyrical: Carry On, by Rainbow Rowell
6 - I’ve met them!: Ashes of the Sun, by Django Wexler (may swap for A Deadly Education, by Naomi Novik)
7 - Out of Time: The Girl from Everywhere, by Heidi Heilig
8 - Dearly Departed: Paper and Fire, by Rachel Caine
9 - Keep up with the Joneses: Caves of Steel, by Isaac Asimov (may swap for The Moon is a Harsh Mistress, by Robert Heinlein, or The Three Musketeers, by Alexander Dumas)
10 - Vast critical acclaim: The Forever War, by Joseph Haldeman (may swap for Dreamsnake, by Vonda McIntyre)
11 - Read it again, Sam: Moon Dreams, by Brad Strickland
12 - Bits and pieces: TBA (I want to read more shorts this year)
 

oneblindmouse

The new me
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 7, 2007
Messages
8,487
Reaction score
555
Location
Spain
I didn't join in last year becasue things started off very badly and then got steadily worse, though I read more than ever before, but this year I think I'll join you again in the challenge. Glad to see some favourite categories reínstated, and some interesting new ones. Ill check back in when I've worked out my list.
 

Chris P

Likes metaphors mixed, not stirred
Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 4, 2009
Messages
19,278
Reaction score
2,892
Location
Vienna, VA
Welcome everyone! Great to see folks joining in.

As for the topics, each year I include any new ones I think up, find used in other challenges, or that are requested in the course of the previous year (hint: if you think of any please let me know!). For the remainder I have a list of about 125 that I use a random sequence generator to select. Hence, of about 40 needed and 125 to chose from, about 1/3 of the list will carry over from one year to the next. I think all 125 have been used in the course of the six years we've been doing this, so long-time participants will have seen this year's entire list before (minus the new ones, of course).
 

oneblindmouse

The new me
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 7, 2007
Messages
8,487
Reaction score
555
Location
Spain
Right. Here goes my list:

1. Bits and pieces: A History of the World in 100 Objects by Neil MacGregor
2. East meets West: Pachinko by Min Jin Lee
3. Succinct: Chance by Joseph Conrad
4. Freebies: Baudolino by Umberto Eco
5. After the fall: Ashes of the Earth by Eliot Pattison
6. How we got to where we are: A Very English Scandal by John Preston
7. Year of the Ox: Burmese Days by George Orwell
8. Alma Mater Matters: The Rebel Angels by Robertson Davies
9. Out of Time OR Holy Moly, Some Authors Like to Use an Awful Lot of Words: The Time Traveller’s Guide to Medieval England by Ian Mortimer
10. Play it again, Sam: The Loved One by Evelyn Waugh (which I read decades ago and can’t remember)
11. Laughing matters: The Salterton Trilogy by Robertson Davies (may swap for Vile Bodies by Evelyn Waugh)
12. Not available in stores: My father-in-law’s manuscript for a novel (I don’t know the title yet)
 
Last edited:

druid12000

You're out of your tree...
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Jul 23, 2011
Messages
7,213
Reaction score
506
Location
The dark side of the moon, making sinister plans..
Ok, finally got the list together:

1. No Cliff Notes This Time: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (yeah, I know, give me a break, I never got around to it :))
2. Laughing Matters: Noir by Christopher Moore
3. Out of Time: Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
4. That Old Black Magic: Ill Wind by Rachel Caine
5. East Meets West: In Love With the World by Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche
6. Ye Olde Book Shoppe: Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
7. Read it Again, Sam: Mirage by Matt Ruff
8. Matryoshka Books: Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
9. Face Your Fears: War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
10. Pixies and Dryads and Elves, Oh My: Legacy of Kings, Book 3 of The Magister Trilogy by C. S. Friedman
11. Out of this World: A Maze of Death by Phillip K. Dick
12. Vast Critical Acclaim: Ringworld​ by Larry Niven
 

Gatteau

Super Member
Registered
Joined
Aug 3, 2020
Messages
245
Reaction score
205
Location
Lake Tahoe
New year, new books, woo hoo! I finished about six from the list I took on when I joined in September last year, which doesn’t feel bad at all, considering. Now I’m sorting through the piles I’ve been eyeing and finding categories for them, adding others. I’m excited to just read all year - maybe I’ll even take a break here and there to write something... feeling good either way.

1. It’s all fun and games: Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo (Maybe a bit of a stretch here, but it starts in a gambling house, and being a gambler in debt is a major plot point for at least one character)
2. Laughing Matters: Animal Farm by George Orwell (or You’re Never Weird on the Internet by Felicia Day)
3. That old black magic: Soulless by Gail Carriger
4. Keep up with the Joneses: Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut
5. Succinct: Renegades by Marissa Meyer
6. I’ve met them: The Only Thing to Fear by Caroline Tung Richmond (ALA 2016 in NOLA, briefly for a book signing)
7. After the Fall: Fate of the Fallen by Kel Kade (I mean, it’s right there in the title... something about zombies, I think)
8. Out of this world: The Cold Between by Elizabeth Bonesteel
9. Freebies: Early Riser by Jasper Fforde (Christmas present from my sister, from her book club last year)
10. Holy moly some authors like to use an awful lot of words: The Strange and Deadly Portraits of Bryony Gray by E. Latimer
11. Pixies and Dryads and Elves, oh my: Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik (Samesies, Chris P! :hi:)
12. How we got to where we are: A Promised Land by Barack Obama
 

Chris P

Likes metaphors mixed, not stirred
Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 4, 2009
Messages
19,278
Reaction score
2,892
Location
Vienna, VA
You all are picking some great books! Many of my favorites on your lists, and many I want to read.

oneblindmouse: I read the Loved One in college. It was good, and quite short if I recall correctly. I think it's better than Vile Bodies, but not as good as Handful of Dust. I've not read Brideshead Revisited, however, even though it's his best-known.

druid: War and Peace is amazing. I'd say it was worth the slow parts, but I don't recall many slow parts. I plan to read it at least a couple more times (I'll just need to be sure to commit the time to do it!).

Gatteau: Let me know when you start reading Spinning Silver and I'll try to read it at the same time so we can compare notes. Vonnegut has hugely influenced my writing. I was in high school, and hadn't ventured much beyond Agatha Christie and Laura Ingalls Wilder when I read Cat's Cradle. My jaw dropped. "You can write like that? Sign me up!" I've read everything of Vonnegut's I've been able to get my hands on and Slaughterhouse Five will not disappoint.
 

oneblindmouse

The new me
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 7, 2007
Messages
8,487
Reaction score
555
Location
Spain
Chris P: Yes, The Loved One is quite short, the shortest book on my list, so I'll treat myself to it after I finish a long one. One of the plusses of lockdown last year was that I came across lots of books at home that I hadn't read, and that were either my husband's domain (Robertson Davis, Umberto Eco), or had belonged to my parents (Evelyn Waugh, Graham Greene, John Buchan, Harrison Ainsworth). So I've been filling my literary gaps.
 

Cobalt Jade

Super Member
Registered
Joined
Oct 21, 2015
Messages
2,237
Reaction score
265
Location
Seattle
My book choices for the year.
=================================

11. Dearly Departed: A book by an author who died within the past four years.
The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison
[Looked interesting]


12. I spy: A book featuring spies or espionage.
Secret Agent: Britain’s Wartime Secret Service, David Stafford
[This is where it all started -- WWII and Britain's SOE]


15. That old black magic: A paranormal novel.
Fledgling, Octavia Butler
The Death of the Necromancer, Martha Wells
[it's a tie]


16. East meets West: A book taking place in Asia.
Empress, Shan Sa
[Historical fiction]


21. Keep up with the Joneses: A book everyone else seems to have read but you have not.
Wicked, Gregory Maguire
[Been meaning to read this for years]


22. Tag team: A book by more than one author.
What a Character! 20th Century Advertising Icons, Warren Dotz, Jim Morton
[Chronicle art book]


24. Read it again, Sam: Reread a book you have already read.
Catcher in the Rye, J. D. Salinger


28. Matryoshka books: A book mentioned or discussed inside another book.
The Golden Notebook, Doris Lessing
[Looked interesting]


27. Succinct: A book with a one-word title.
Syncopation, Anna Zabo
[M/M Romance with a rock star]


36. Bits and pieces: An anthology (poetry, short stories, whatever).
The Dragon Quintet, Marvin Kaye, ed.[Five novelettes about dragons]


37. Out of this world: A book taking place in space or on another planet.
Brightness Falls from the Air, Joan D. Vinge
[Let's give it another try]


38. Freebies: A book you (legally) obtained without paying for. (Christmas gift)
You Look Like A Thing and I love You, Janelle Shae
[Thoughts on AI]
 
Last edited:

mrsmig

Write. Write. Writey Write Write.
Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Jul 4, 2012
Messages
7,081
Reaction score
1,738
Location
Virginia
Finally had a chance to sit down and flesh out my list. Since my 2020 list was heavily non-fiction, I'm making a concerted effort to read more novels in 2021.

1. Year of the Ox. The Children's Blizzard, by Melanie Benjamin.

8. Girls chase boys chase girls. Olive Kitteridge, by Elizabeth Stout.

10. 21st century, 21st year, 21st letter. Baba Yaga Laid An Egg, by Dubravka Ugresic.

22. Tag team. Ghostways, by Robert MacFarlane and Dan Richards

27. Succinct. Later, by Stephen King. (releases early March 2021)

30. I've met them! Warlock, by Oakley Hall. (I took a creative writing course with Mr. Hall back when I was in college, many moons ago.)

32. Verboten. Thirteen Reasons Why, by Jay Asher.

33. What your parents read. Dead Man's Folly, by Agatha Christie.

36. Bits and pieces. Best American Science and Nature Writing 2019.

37. Out of this world. Old Man's War, by John Scalzi.

38. Freebies. Vesper Flights, by Helen MacDonald.

42. LOL random. Uncle Wiggily's Story Book, by Howard Roger Garis.
 

Chris P

Likes metaphors mixed, not stirred
Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 4, 2009
Messages
19,278
Reaction score
2,892
Location
Vienna, VA
I already finished my first book: Artemis by Andy Weir, for the Out of this World book. Jasmine "Jazz" Bashara makes her meager living smuggling goods from Earth to the Moon's industrial and tourist city of Artemis. A wealthy benefactor gives her the chance of a lifetime if she can pull off an act of (quite major) vandalism that will allow him to sway certain business contracts his way. Things don't quite go as planned for Jazz, and she has to improvise her charm and network of law-abiding Artemisians who aren't afraid to get their hands a little dirty, even against the burgeoning lunar mob.

What fun! I don't read much space sci-fi, and Weir kept Jazz's voice fresh (if more snarky than I'd like at times) and the action moving. The science was plainly presented, and well-enough researched for this purpose; I learned a thing or two about the Moon but I'll fact check before rolling out these facts at parties. There were a few "Oh, please! Gimme a break!" moments, but the book had just enough sci-fiy camp it didn't put me off amid a fairly well-told story.



  1. Laughing Matters: A humorous or satirical book. Nothing to see here – Kevin Wilson
  2. I spy: A book featuring spies or espionage. Need to know – Karen Cleveland
  3. Local hero: A book by a local author. First cosmic velocity – Zack Powers
  4. 21[SUP]st[/SUP] Year, 21[SUP]st[/SUP] Letter: A book by someone whose first or last name begins with the letter U House of Broken Angels – Luis Alberto Urrea
  5. Locked up: A book taking place in a prison, mental institution or treatment center. What She Left Behind – Ellen Marie Wiseman
  6. What your parents read: Any novel from the year you were born. Love in the Ruins – Walker Percy
  7. Out of this world: A book taking place in space or on another planet. Artemis – Andy Weir Done
  8. Keep up with the Joneses: A book everyone else seems to have read but you have not. The Book Thief – Markus Zusak
  9. Feisty feline fiesta: A book with a cat on the cover. Cat Chaser – Elmore Leonard
  10. Pixies and Dryads and Elves, oh my!: A high fantasy. Spinning Silver – Naomi Novik
  11. Run for the border: A book about or taking place in Central or South America. 100 years of solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  12. Vast critical acclaim: A book that has won a prestigious award. Discomfort of Evening – Marieke Lucas Rijneveld (Man Booker International award).
 

Perscribo

Pound cake.
Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Jul 24, 2011
Messages
2,739
Reaction score
369
Location
California
Website
www.perscribo.com
What a great idea this is! So glad to have found this thread. I already know this is an overly-ambitious list, but still incredibly motivating. All of these are in my house already, so if it takes 1 or 10 years to get them I’ll have to forge on.


  • Tag team. “Letters From Iceland” by W.H. Auden and Louis MacNeice. I heard this book quoted in the lovely movie, “Away From Her” and have been wanting to read it ever since.
  • Bits and pieces. “Tulips & Chimneys” by E.E. Cummmings. I am currently transcribing and folding this book, that entered public domain two years ago, into my current (perscribo.com) Cummings Kindle eBook collection.
  • Holy moly some authors like to use an awful lot of words. “Dickinson’s Nerves, Frost’s Woods. Poetry in the Shadow of the Past.” by William Logan. Being entrenched in 20th century poetry criticism through my transcriptions, I think it’s time for a new century perspective.
  • Read it again, Sam. Could also serve as high fantasy, but I recently purchased the first four “Lord of the Rings” paperback books by J.R.R. Tolkien (for my 14 year old son) and have been wanting to read them again.
  • Dearly Departed. “Devotions” by Mary Oliver (1935-2019). I was born in Ohio and spent a great deal of my childhood playing outdoors. This lady holds a special place in my heart.
  • Feisty feline fiesta. “Kaibyō: The Supernatural Cats of Japan” by Zack Davisson. Another book I purchased for my son, an avid cat lover.
  • No Cliff Notes this time. “The Sound and the Fury” by William Faulkner. I read this in college but have been wanting to reread it since having had a special needs son (now 12) that reminds me a lot of Benji.
  • Run for the border. “El Salvador” by Joan Didion.
  • Succinct. “Islam” by Karen Armstrong.
  • Keep up with the Joneses. “A Room of One’s Own” by Virginia Woolf. At one time I had aversion to reading authors who committed suicide, thinking they would just depress me. I am older and wiser now.
  • Epic Odyssey. “The Odyssey” by Homer. I have a new translation by Emily Wilson which was gifted to me last year. The reviews looks good.
  • Face your fears. “The I Ching.” The Richard Wilhelm translation from Chinese to German, and rendered into English by Cary F. Barnes. If I get to this point I will truly be impressed with myself.
 
Last edited:

Gatteau

Super Member
Registered
Joined
Aug 3, 2020
Messages
245
Reaction score
205
Location
Lake Tahoe
Chris P: I read Artemis last year too! I also thought it was a really fun story, and I liked the Lunar society he created - it reminded me a little bit of Bladerunner, in some ways, like the traversing the city and the ultimate power resting with the corporate money (but without quite so much of the dramatic rain and grunginess that accompanies a Ridley Scott film). I loved the confidence Jazz had throughout it all, but also her realism; she knew the consequences for everything she was doing and was constantly weighing the risks in accordance with what the gain would be for her, vs the fallout for their greater society.
Have you read The Martian? I do think I would rate that higher overall, of his books. I think it's got a lot of the same tone, and about the same level of science-y bits which he finds a good way to describe in layman's terms while keeping interest in the story. But I felt like Artemis tipped slightly more toward YA for me, and The Martian ended up feeling more real.
 

Chris P

Likes metaphors mixed, not stirred
Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 4, 2009
Messages
19,278
Reaction score
2,892
Location
Vienna, VA
Perscribo: Welcome! I re-read Illiad and Odyssey last year, having last read them in school back in the day. There were parts I remembered clear as day, and parts I'd completely forgotten! I totally forgot about Telemachus entirely, to the point for a while I wondered if I'd read a condensed version without his parts in it. For the I Ching, I had a copy of that, but I must have misunderstood its purpose because it didn't seem like anything you could sit down and read. I look forward to hearing what you think.

Gatteau: I wanted to see the movie The Martian really bad, but any time we would think about going the group wanted to see something else. I almost chose it for the challenge, but went with a newer book just to be newer. I picked up on the YA feel of Artemis, which isn't always bad it's just not what I usually look for.
 

Gatteau

Super Member
Registered
Joined
Aug 3, 2020
Messages
245
Reaction score
205
Location
Lake Tahoe
Aw, well that’s silly, it was a really good movie!

The Martian is one of those rare ones where I actually like both the book and the movie, almost equally. They are very separate entities to me, and the main character in the movie is actually quite different from the book in some ways, but they each do what they do and tell the story well.
 

Brightdreamer

Just Another Lazy Perfectionist
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Apr 22, 2012
Messages
9,214
Reaction score
1,434
Location
USA
Website
brightdreamersbookreviews.blogspot.com
The Martian movie is a great example of a book-to-media translation done right, right up there with The Expanse series.

Anyway, I started Caves of Steel the other day. So far... it's showing its age. A fair bit of "as you know, Bob", and a future that seems dated (and white male centered - even the Spacers are tall and fair). Plus it danced a bit too long before stating the robot angle.

Updated List:
1 - Year of the Ox: Across the Green Grass Fields, by Seanan McGuire (may swap for Leviathan Falls, by James S. A. Corey)
2 - Freebies: Riot Baby, by Tochi Onyebuchi (may swap for Silver in the Wood, by Emily Tesh - both obtained through Tor's ebook-of-the-month club)
3 - The Other Side: The Girl in the Green Silk Gown, by Seanan McGuire
4 - Out of the park on first at-bat: Raybearer, by Jordan Ifueko
5 - Waxing lyrical: Carry On, by Rainbow Rowell
6 - I’ve met them!: Ashes of the Sun, by Django Wexler (may swap for A Deadly Education, by Naomi Novik)
7 - Out of Time: The Girl from Everywhere, by Heidi Heilig
8 - Dearly Departed: Paper and Fire, by Rachel Caine
9 - Keep up with the Joneses: Caves of Steel, by Isaac Asimov - STARTED 1/8
10 - Vast critical acclaim: The Forever War, by Joseph Haldeman (may swap for Dreamsnake, by Vonda McIntyre)
11 - Read it again, Sam: Moon Dreams, by Brad Strickland
12 - Bits and pieces: TBA (I want to read more shorts this year)
 

druid12000

You're out of your tree...
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Jul 23, 2011
Messages
7,213
Reaction score
506
Location
The dark side of the moon, making sinister plans..
Finished Noir by Christopher Moore last night. While it's not as good as some of his previous work, I love his irreverent style. He always does a good job researching his settings and time periods to help immerse the reader in the fabric he weaves. And his descriptions that come out of the blue are hilarious!

I'm going to tackle War and Peace next. Should be fun :D

1. No Cliff Notes This Time: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (yeah, I know, give me a break, I never got around to it :))
2. Laughing Matters: Noir by Christopher Moore ​Done
3. Out of Time: Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
4. That Old Black Magic: Ill Wind by Rachel Caine
5. East Meets West: In Love With the World by Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche
6. Ye Olde Book Shoppe: Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
7. Read it Again, Sam: Mirage by Matt Ruff
8. Matryoshka Books: Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
9. Face Your Fears: War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
10. Pixies and Dryads and Elves, Oh My: Legacy of Kings, Book 3 of The Magister Trilogy by C. S. Friedman
11. Out of this World: A Maze of Death by Phillip K. Dick
12. Vast Critical Acclaim: Ringworld​ by Larry Niven
 

sphynge

Super Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 27, 2020
Messages
51
Reaction score
6
Location
North of Confused
Verboten - love your list. Allende is a near and dear author to me. Sadly... in cold blood I read last year and basically hated most of it. I think it’s one of those, ok it was innovative for its time but.... yeah no. Regretted finishing it even. :/
 

Happy Thanksgiving

Autumn image for Thanksgiving