Talk about the kidlit you're reading!

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Editing for authors: because every writer needs a good editor.

Nowbod

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Thanks for starting this topic, I like children books very much and read them for my little sister, She has 6 years old and she always insists me on reading book because, when reading a book for each character, I speak a different voice for each character in the story, and she loves this kind of storytelling.
Recently I read for her the story of Matilda by Roald Dahl, This was the fourth time I read the book because I and my sister love this story. The hilarious thing about parents is that even if their child is the most ambitious of the universe, they think they are genius! But have you ever thought of the point of it? Extremely clever and talented kids who are suppressed and do not flourish because of the folly and ignorance of their parents and their whole society! Matilda is one of the same guys; a five-year-old genius who stuck with a stupid parent.
The mother tells the girl what to do with books and literacy? A girl who should not be clever, just have to look for the "color and gloss" and beautify herself so that she can find a wealthy husband. A father who sees success as a scam and does not value gentleness and intelligence constantly scoffs with his daughter and speaks badly.
The terrible person, Mrs. Trancheboll, the school principal, who is a gigantic, extraordinarily wild and naughty woman, enjoys the harassment of children, which may scare the book for kids. Somewhere in the story, she raises a girl from her hair and turns to the athlete's throwing disk, who, by chance, has a history of such a sport in her work, shakes her hand and throws her out of school! Instead, she breaks a container over a ten-year-old child. Whenever she sees that his baby has not cleaned himself in the bathroom, he takes his head and puts you in the water!

If we pass from a good idea of the story, I think personality is also super good. Mrs. Tranchebol is so scary and Matilda himself so lovely that the presence of each of them on the scene changes human emotions. It was very good in general. A movie has been made on this book, which is not without grace after reading the book.
 

t0dd

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I've just finished, and would like to recommend, "Queen of the Sea" by Dylan Meconis. It's a children's graphic novel about a foundling girl raised in a nunnery on a remote island. When the nearby Queen Eleanor is deposed by her half-sister and banished to the nunnery, the foundling becomes involved in the power struggle between the two sisters.

It's beautifully written and illustrated, combining a good story with a rich depiction of life in the nunnery and on the island. The setting is fictional, but it could be interpreted as alternate history; certainly both Queen Eleanor and her late father, King Edmund, will look very familiar to those with even a casual knowledge of 16th century English history.
 

Kjbartolotta

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I've just finished, and would like to recommend, "Queen of the Sea" by Dylan Meconis. It's a children's graphic novel about a foundling girl raised in a nunnery on a remote island. When the nearby Queen Eleanor is deposed by her half-sister and banished to the nunnery, the foundling becomes involved in the power struggle between the two sisters.

It's beautifully written and illustrated, combining a good story with a rich depiction of life in the nunnery and on the island. The setting is fictional, but it could be interpreted as alternate history; certainly both Queen Eleanor and her late father, King Edmund, will look very familiar to those with even a casual knowledge of 16th century English history.

Ooh, I read that too and found it really interesting!
 

edutton

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I've just finished, and would like to recommend, "Queen of the Sea" by Dylan Meconis. It's a children's graphic novel about a foundling girl raised in a nunnery on a remote island. When the nearby Queen Eleanor is deposed by her half-sister and banished to the nunnery, the foundling becomes involved in the power struggle between the two sisters.

It's beautifully written and illustrated, combining a good story with a rich depiction of life in the nunnery and on the island. The setting is fictional, but it could be interpreted as alternate history; certainly both Queen Eleanor and her late father, King Edmund, will look very familiar to those with even a casual knowledge of 16th century English history.
Oh, cool! I remember reading her comic "Bite Me!" (vampires in the French Revolution) years ago, when it first went online... going to check this out now, thanks!

[ETA: Yes! The library has it. :)]
 
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GeneBWell

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Spirit Hunters by Ellen Oh might be one of the best haunting books I've ever read, no matter the age group. It's so good! And spooky! I was honestly surprised how much reading it was like watching a very well made, subtle haunting/possession horror movie. Highly recommended. It may actually be one of my favorite horror novels ever. Maybe don't let kids prone to nightmares read it because it's got enough in there to give a hardened horror-watcher like me chills.

After finishing that I started Dragon Pearl by Yoon Ha Lee and can I just say that I didn't know how much I needed an SF book about a fox girl in human form wanting to join the space army until I met this book. Rick Riordan's initiative to get stories about all kinds of mythologies from people born to those cultures is yielding all kinds of amazing fruit. Highly recommend checking all these out.
 

Arrow

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I've been reading (listening to, really, as I have time to listen while doing other things and minimal time to read these days) the Keeper of the List Cities series, middle grades fantasy.
It's actually some of the more irritating writing I've come across, I've noticed a lot of repetitive word use which is unfortunately one of my own common faults when I write. Words like"usually" get strewn way more often than I realize until I go back to edit.
 

playground

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I've been reading (listening to, really, as I have time to listen while doing other things and minimal time to read these days) the Keeper of the List Cities series, middle grades fantasy.
It's actually some of the more irritating writing I've come across, I've noticed a lot of repetitive word use which is unfortunately one of my own common faults when I write. Words like"usually" get strewn way more often than I realize until I go back to edit.


I read that like a year ago maybe. Wasn't crazy about it either.

I just finished the Twelve by Cindy Lin. High Fantasy based around the Chinese zodiac system. Really fun read.
 
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t0dd

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I've just read Jane Yolen's "The Transfigured Hart", a story about a couple of children and a white hart that they believe to be a unicorn. It's a moving and magical tale, which I recommend.
 

The Second Moon

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Just finished "The Familiars". It was a blast. 4.5 stars.

I loved the humor and imagery.

I got a little tripped up on all the history, which is why I gave it 4.5 stars.

Overall a great read and I will be ordering the rest of the series.
 

starrystorm

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Finished our own The Second Moon's Barney & Mr. Thomas.

I know she's my sister, but I honestly did love this book, and truthfully rate this thing five stars.

I posted this review on Instagram so judge how you want:

This book is everything that an mg book should be: funny, creative, and educational.

This was the funniest book I've ever read. Laughs for all ages that doesn't include body humor or cheap gags. It was funny from the beginning to the end.

Also super creative. How do other authors think of this kind of stuff? I was deeply engaged, and blasted through it in two days.

This book, being a sci-fi, was also educational, but not to the point that you're aware of it. It's more full of science fun facts than being a lecture.

Five stars, you have to read this. Can't wait for the sequel.
 

The Second Moon

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Starry - Aww. Thank you.

I read "My Dairy at the Edge of the World" by Jodi Lynn Anderson a while ago and here's my review. (I rate it five stars)

Since this MG novel is about a family literally running from death, (not a spoiler) I was expecting to be broken. I was not broken, but instead I was shattered.

The book made me realize that the world is beautiful and amazing, particularly the little things and the connections between family members. The book itself was so touching, bittersweet, and yet hilarious at the same time.

There were so many plot twists, each one making the characters more real and the adventure they were on more thrilling.

I can't find anything wrong with this book except it was quite long at over 400 pages, but wow, was every page worth it.
 

sphynge

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Faves in picture books - Not quite narwhal by Jessica sima and Dragons love tacos by Adam Rubin. I’m shooting for that kind of awesome... one day. One. Day.
 

t0dd

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I recently reread Alan Garner's "The Weirdstone of Brisingamen" and "The Moon of Gomrath", which I had discovered and enjoyed as a boy. A few obserations.

1. The main characters, Colin and Susan, felt "under-characterized" in comparison with other leads of children's fantasy, especially more recent ones. I didn't get much sense of their growing and changing in the first book (beyond their excitement at discovering a hidden magical world and disappointment at being shut out of it, if for their own protection, and a mention, in the middle of the book when they're fleeing through the mines, that Susan has begun taking the initiative rather than letting her brother lead, to Colin's astonishment); in particular, they seemed almost overshadowed in the latter part of the book, more observers being protected by the grown-ups (it almost becomes more Durathror's story, the dwarf warrior exiled by his people for giving away their leading magical treasure to the elf-king). We get a bit more, though, in "The Moon of Gomrath" with Susan getting drawn more into the magical world. I've read that Garner looked down on these books, regarding them as poorly written, and Susan and Colin's depiction strikes me as the likeliest reason for that.

2. The description of the countryside around Alderley Edge is very impressive; you get a sense that Garner knew this place well, and - for the most part - loved it. (The chief exception being the intrusions of the modern world; I wouldn't be surprised if the scene where Colin and Susan see a noisy family on vacation at the Edge and think that they're destroying the majesty and wonder of the place was based on an actual experience of Garner's.) He truly brings it to life. (And it often becomes more of a threat to Colin and Susan than the mythical beings pursuing them - and I'm not saying that as an insult to the mythical beings.) As a side-note, in the second book, there's talk about the elves going on an expedition against evil stirring in Scotland and taking Susan along with them to help them, but the expedition never takes place. I thought that just as well; taking the story away from Cheshire would have removed one of its great strengths.)

3. I enjoyed the mythical elements as well; it's particularly fun to recognize the allusions to Norse mythology or Welsh and Irish legend. (Garner, as he states at the end of "The Moon of Gomrath", took care to use actual mythical names throughout rather than to invent any.) The story of the Sleepers is an actual legend about Alderley Edge, in particular;; nowadays the Sleepers are identified with King Arthur and his knights, but Garner makes them anonymous (and the "new legend" he weaves for them better fits the sleeping company of knights than their being Arthur's, given that in the legend, nearly all of Arthur's knights are killed in the final battle and he's taken off to Avalon alone - Garner's version makes the presence of the sleeping knights around the king more convincing).
 

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