Religious sayings you remember - even if you're no longer part of that religion

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juniper

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I was walking past a hospital chapel this afternoon when a phrase sprang to mind - "bless me father, it's been a long time since my last confession" or something like that. I know I didn't include the part "for I have sinned".

I've never been part of the Roman Catholic church or any other church that required confession, so that must have come from watching movies or tv or reading. I was an Episcopalian from about age 24 - 40ish and it's optional and rarely used apparently. I never went to confession.

As a former Episcopalian, the phrase "Peace be with you" (standard liturgical greeting between service attendees) has sprung to mind more frequently, and I sometimes use that to close letters or emails.

Now, as a Unitarian Universalist, that's not part of our services - there is no UU liturgy - but I could still say it when greeting others. "Peace be with you" seems like a good thing to say for many, most, all people, regardless of their religious / non-religious persuasion.

Are there any bits of a former religion you remember - and maybe might still use or at least consider valuable?

As an offshoot, I know many former Christians who still enjoy singing the Christmas songs they grew up with. I'm one of those, even though I don't believe some of the words anymore and those particular parts kinda stick in my throat. I might hum through those and then pick up the other words ...
 

Silva

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My husband had this funny thing where he would say "peace be upon you" under his breath during the meet and greet at the more conservative evangelical churches we visited, since they tend to be anti-liturgical and he's a bit of a real life troll. :)

Also with the religious songs-- I used to listen exclusively to religious music (secular music was teh ebil). Couldn't at all when I deconverted; now I've managed to create some emotional distance and can appreciate a few (i.e. the ones that are actually well done musically) as "a cultural thing that I'm not part of" like many other (non-religious) cultural things that I don't identify with but still find beautiful. It's nice, to have that emotional distance, finally. Though my sister wanted to sit down and hymn-jam with me over the holidays and that was a little awkward as she's very seriously and emotionally singing the songs and I'm kinda going through the motions. She doesn't know.
 

Silva

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Oh, also I had this internal bargaining-prayer thing that I'd do when I was in physical pain. Still catch myself doing that. Better than blistering everyone's ears, I suppose. ;)
 

Dennis E. Taylor

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As an offshoot, I know many former Christians who still enjoy singing the Christmas songs they grew up with. I'm one of those, even though I don't believe some of the words anymore and those particular parts kinda stick in my throat. I might hum through those and then pick up the other words ...

I'm a humanist, but I still love the xmas songs. I can sing Silent Night without wincing, because I've always loved the song. The way I see it, it's no different than singing Rudolf the Red-Nosed Reindeer. I don't believe in flying ungulates with glowing noses, either.
 

Siri Kirpal

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Sat Nam! (literally "Truth Name"--a Sikh greeting)

I love the Christian hymns. Before my parents deconverted, I used to go to Sunday school. If we had a choice, I always asked to sing, Holy, Holy, Holy. "Early in the morning our songs shall rise to Thee" (a quote from the song) is something Sikhs actually do. Hear those words in my mind every now and then.

Blessings,

Siri Kirpal
 

darkprincealain

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I'll never forget the Buddhist Lojong slogan of, "Don't talk about injured limbs." Oversimplifying, it is a reminder not to talk behind someone's back. However, just the way it is phrased in the translation is enough to jolt you awake.
 

Maxx

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As an offshoot, I know many former Christians who still enjoy singing the Christmas songs they grew up with. I'm one of those, even though I don't believe some of the words anymore and those particular parts kinda stick in my throat. I might hum through those and then pick up the other words ...

I have been an atheist since I had a vision of the universe at the age of three, BUT with a non-religious kick-off like that, I have always enjoyed many things about every religion I have encountered. As a child, I was always careful not to let people know there was no god since I thought they would find that disappointing. Anyway...one day, after I was in the middle of painting an immense room in a house I had just purchased and I was far up on a ladder in this vast white space, I sang the "Therefore, with Angels and Archangels and all the company of Heaven, we laud and magnify Thy glorious Name, evermore praising Thee and saying....etc." So yep...I treasure a lot of religious verbiage.
 

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I don't know if this counts as a religious saying but I do know that it is in the New Testament; Treat others as you wish to be treated yourself". Very good, that one.

And then there is this one, from my Grandmother who was a Seventh Day Adventist; "Everything happens in the order is has to". As an adult I asked her what she meant by that, and she said this; "Sometimes you have go through things in life that tastes like sh*t in your mouth, but when you turn around two years later and look back, you realize that it happened because it gave you the streangth to live through what you are facing today".

My Grandmother is my beacon, my idol and the most wonderful person whoever walked this Earth. I loved her, and lost her in 1983. She was then 86 years old, but still young at heart. She was a woman of steel and resolve, but also a woman with the greatest compassion and understanding. Whenever she said something I listened and believed her. I am not sure that this saying of hers actually has religious roots, but to me it has become something to live by.

I am a hard core non-believer (atheist as some would prefer) but the only Christmas songs I actually listen to by my own choice are religious. They move me to tears. I absolutely hate, and double-hate the sleighbell and santa tunes they spew out in stores all over the place.
 
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