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Rainstorm Press

editing_for_authors
Editing for authors: because every writer needs a good editor.

akaria

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Brand spanking new. http://www.rainstormpress.com/

From the Contact Us page:

[FONT=&quot]Rainstorm Press is an independent publisher, owned and operated by Lyle Perez-Tinics and Mandy Perez-Tinics, that specializes in horror, dark romance, mystery & thrillers and some erotica, but will also consider other genres. We opened our doors in 2011 and plan to be around for many years to come. If you're an established author or someone who has always wanted to write a novel, we'd love to hear from you!

[/FONT]First red flag: [FONT=&quot]"Payments will be negotiated after we have read and accepted your submission."

[/FONT]
 

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Of the four titles they have published, one of them is listed in Bookscan as being distributed by CreateSpace. The rest are listed as being distributed by Rainstorm. None of the titles list any sales at all. Appears to be either a POD press or vanity. Either way, they don't appear to have any meaningful distribution.
 

Philipjames

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Unsure about a publisher

Hi folks. New to the site and an unpublished writer. I'll get straight to business (life is short after all!). I submitted my novel to Rainstorm Press and have now had an offer to publish. The problem is, since I submitted, I've read some stuff that suggests Rainstorm might not be worth submitting to. There was the suggestion they might be POD or a vanity publisher. The offer I've had seems to rule out the latter as they haven't asked me for money. They are, in fact, offering 25% royalties but no advance. They've said the book will be available on amazon and Barnes & Noble, but not necessarily in book shops. That's the gist of the offer. What do you all think? I have 14 days to reply. Part of me says hold out, while another part is scared I'd be passing up the chance to be published.
 

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After looking at the Beware's thread, your answer should come easily. Value your work more than that. Hang in there and make it worthy of your effort.
 

Katrina S. Forest

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What do you all think? I have 14 days to reply. Part of me says hold out, while another part is scared I'd be passing up the chance to be published.

This is mostly general advice, not specific to the publisher in question.

You always have the chance to be published through self-publishing. The question is, will this publisher give you something that self-publishing can't? If so, great. If not, why split profits with them?

Anyone can call themselves a publisher. Anyone can put out a call for submissions and send an acceptance letter. Not everyone knows how to sell books.
 

Amanda R.

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I got an offer to publish my book! YEAH!!!!!!!!!!!! (merged into pub's thread in BR&BC)

OK, I am totally excited and freaking out right now, but I got an offer on my book! I am jumping up and down and want to tell them right now that I accept, but I want to make sure I'm not missing anything. It is with Rainstorm Press and here are the terms they sent over:

25% net royalties on both paperback and eBook. Paperback will be distributed through Amazon.com and eBook will be distributed through Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com. We do not pay advances because we don't like the idea of an author having to pay us back the advance if they have not earned it back through royalties. We feel that the author should receive their royalties from the beginning and not have to worry about earning back the advance. We will pay an editor to work with you on polishing up the manuscript before it sees print. One of our in-house artists will create a book cover for your manuscript. You will be able to work with the editor and artist for your manuscript. We purchase a unique ISBN for your book and make sure it gets the best distribution possible. We are set up with the Library of Congress so your book will be cataloged. You will receive 5 complimentary copies of the finished work.

That all seems good, right? I have 14 days to respond, but I wanna accept right now. I worked on this book (a Gothic, vampire romance) for 5 years. And I just quit my job to focus on writing full-time. I have made so many mistakes in my life over the last three years, I think I am finally on the right track.
 

Kayley

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I don't have expertise in this area, so I'll refrain from saying anything specific, but it might interest you to look at Rainstorm Press' BR&BC thread if you haven't already: Rainstorm Press.

Once again, that's just something to read in the meantime. Someone more knowledgeable in this area should come by soon and give you advice related to your individual situation.

EDIT: This post was in regard to a separate thread Amanda had created, but since they've been merged now, it's no longer relevant.
 
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TomGrimm

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25% net royalties on both paperback and eBook. Paperback will be distributed through Amazon.com and eBook will be distributed through Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com. We do not pay advances because we don't like the idea of an author having to pay us back the advance if they have not earned it back through royalties. We feel that the author should receive their royalties from the beginning and not have to worry about earning back the advance. We will pay an editor to work with you on polishing up the manuscript before it sees print. One of our in-house artists will create a book cover for your manuscript. You will be able to work with the editor and artist for your manuscript. We purchase a unique ISBN for your book and make sure it gets the best distribution possible. We are set up with the Library of Congress so your book will be cataloged. You will receive 5 complimentary copies of the finished work.

I didn't think this was how advances work, and just to double check I googled it, and sure enough, BAM. The fact that a publisher doesn't know that's not how advances work doesn't inspire confidence. My first thought is they don't know enough about the publishing industry themselves. My second thought is that they do know, and they're playing on the myth to scare you from going to other publishers who offer advances, or just trying to validate not paying one and demonizing the rest of the industry in the process.
 

James D. Macdonald

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25% net royalties on both paperback and eBook.
Standard royalties are on cover price. "Net" can be a slippery thing.

Paperback will be distributed through Amazon.com

They're getting it printed by CreateSpace?

and eBook will be distributed through Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com.

That's easy enough to do: https://www.amazon.com/?tag=absowrit-20 and http://pubit.barnesandnoble.com/

We do not pay advances because we don't like the idea of an author having to pay us back the advance if they have not earned it back through royalties.

Authors never pay back unearned advances. The idea that they do is a myth. The only time authors have to pay back an advance is if the author fails to provide a book.

My guess: The reason they don't pay advances is because they're undercapitalized and don't have the ability to sell a whole lot of books.

We feel that the author should receive their royalties from the beginning and not have to worry about earning back the advance.

I feel that authors should receive substantial advances. Earning back the advance is the publisher's lookout.

We will pay an editor to work with you on polishing up the manuscript before it sees print.

And a darned good thing, too! Hate to think that they'd try to get an editor to do it for free. Any clue about who these editors are or what their experience might be?

One of our in-house artists will create a book cover for your manuscript. You will be able to work with the editor and artist for your manuscript.

Just like a real publisher!

We purchase a unique ISBN for your book and make sure it gets the best distribution possible. We are set up with the Library of Congress so your book will be cataloged.

This meets the very minimum standard of "available for sale."

You will receive 5 complimentary copies of the finished work.

Finally, something reasonable, although five is a pretty low number.

That all seems good, right? I have 14 days to respond, but I wanna accept right now. I worked on this book (a Gothic, vampire romance) for 5 years. And I just quit my job to focus on writing full-time. I have made so many mistakes in my life over the last three years, I think I am finally on the right track.

Where else did you submit it? Have you attempted to get an agent?

You won't be able to make a living by selling books to no-advance pays-on-net published-through-Amazon publishers.

A book that's publishable by one is publishable by many. Don't shoot low. Five years is a long time to throw away on a publisher that looks like it's just one notch above doing it yourself.
 

aliceshortcake

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I'd be inclined to RUN rather than walk. Don't risk throwing away your hard work with this outfit.
 

Katrina S. Forest

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I agree about walking away. They gave you a major piece of misinformation. Now either they knew it was wrong and tried to deceive you or they didn't know enough about publishing themselves to realize their mistake.

Neither dishonesty nor inexperience are things you can negotiate out of a contract.
 

Terie

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Well, what should I do? Should I confront them about these things (I'm worried about the "net" and trying to tell me that authors pay back royalties) and try to renegotiate? Or should I just walk away?

Why wouldn't you walk away from an offer from a publisher who won't pay you an advance for your work, can't get your books onto bookshop shelves so that you can actually earn royalties from sales, and is either ignorant of how publishing works or tells outright falsehoods?

Being badly published is worse than not being published at all.
 

shaldna

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It is with Rainstorm Press and here are the terms they sent over:

25% net royalties on both paperback and eBook.

This sounds like a lot, but bear in mind that net is what the publisher recieves for the book, not the cover price. Factor in discounts etc and you can be left with pennies per copy sold - before signing a contract you need to think about how much you are likely to make.


Paperback will be distributed through Amazon.com and eBook will be distributed through Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com.

So no instore placement? Not necessarily the end of the world. But do they offer books for sale on their website, for example - this would give them a higher profit margin and as a result the author would get a higher amount.


We do not pay advances because we don't like the idea of an author having to pay us back the advance if they have not earned it back through royalties.

Either they are trying to mislead you and are banking on your inexperience, or they simply don't know what they are talking about.

Advances are not usually paid back. They are an upfront payment based on how much the publisher expects your book to make for you in terms of sales.

Now, I've seen a lot of small presses offer no advance, and that's not necessarily the worst thing in the world. However, the way they tried to explain it is raising a lot of red flags.


We feel that the author should receive their royalties from the beginning and not have to worry about earning back the advance. We will pay an editor to work with you on polishing up the manuscript before it sees print.

So they don't have in house editing? That can be slightly worrying. It suggests lack of experience, but also if they are using freelancers then there's no guarentees when it comes to quality of work and previous experience.


One of our in-house artists will create a book cover for your manuscript. You will be able to work with the editor and artist for your manuscript.

I'd be wanting to look at the quality of books they are currently putting out before commenting on this. But I'd say the same thing about any other publisher - the best judge of their abilities is to see what sort of quality they are producing.


We purchase a unique ISBN for your book and make sure it gets the best distribution possible. We are set up with the Library of Congress so your book will be cataloged. You will receive 5 complimentary copies of the finished work.

I'm not sure about the states, but I know that in the UK any book published with an ISBN can be requested by certain libraries - don't quote me (I'd have to check with the hubby but he's asleep) but I think they can request that the pubisher provided them with a certain number of copies at the publishers cost. I would assume that the Library of Congress works the same way - can someone clarify.

Now, what I'd like to know at this stage is how many copies they are going to send out for review and to who. I'd like to know if I, as an author, can request additional copies, free of charge, for things like giveaways etc on my own websites etc.

That all seems good, right?

No. It doesn't.

I've seen a lot of these small presses start up, often with the best of intentions, but generally run by people with little or no experience, and it's always the authors who end up getting shafted.

My general advice would be to wait and see what sort of books they produce, what the quality is like and what other authors have said about their experiences with them.


I have 14 days to respond, but I wanna accept right now. I worked on this book (a Gothic, vampire romance) for 5 years. And I just quit my job to focus on writing full-time. I have made so many mistakes in my life over the last three years, I think I am finally on the right track.

If your book is good enough for you to make a living writing, then chances are that another, better, publisher will be interested.

That said, I always advise folks NOT to give up their day job to write unless they are in a sound financial situation and have enough savings etc to cover at least two years.

Whatever you decide, good luck.
 

Marian Perera

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That said, I always advise folks NOT to give up their day job to write unless they are in a sound financial situation and have enough savings etc to cover at least two years.

If I were depending solely on writing to pay the bills, the first question I'd have regarding a press would be how much money its authors earned, on average.

So if you're asking other Rainstorm authors about their experiences, it might be better to find out about their sales figures rather than, say, whether they're happy with this publisher. You can't take happiness to the bank.
 

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