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Published authors writing both SF & Fantasy

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Sparverius

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I wasn't having luck on Google, trying to find a list of published authors who write both science fiction and fantasy (but not specifically science fantasy or crossover), under one name.

Who comes to mind?



EDIT—collated responses:

Kameron Hurley, Martha Wells, Brandon Sanderson, Richard K. Morgan, George R.R. Martin, Kevin J. Anderson, Catherynne M. Valente, Tad Williams, Steven Erikson, Ann Leckie, Elizabeth Bear, Nnedi Okorafor, Karen Lord, Adrian Tchaikovsky, Paolo Bacigalupi, Aliette de Bodard, Shami Stovall

Lois McMaster Bujold, C.S. Lewis, Andre Norton, C.J. Cherryh, Orson Scott Card, Fritz Lieber, Elizabeth Moon, Terry Pratchett, CJ Cherryh, Stephen Donaldson, Ursula K LeGuin, Michael Moorcock, Tanith Lee, Poul Anderson, L. Sprague de Camp, Joan Vinge, Margaret Atwood, David Drake, Fred Saberhagen, Barbara Hambly

YA — Marissa Meyers, Katherine/K. A. Applegate
 
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lonestarlibrarian

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First one I can think of is Lois McMaster Bujold.
 

Brightdreamer

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Kevin J. Anderson
Katherine/K. A. Applegate
Fritz Lieber
George R. R. Martin
Elizabeth Moon
Terry Pratchett
Catherynne M. Valente
Margaret Weis
Tad Williams
Jane Yolen
 

RobertLCollins

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Kristine Kathryn Rusch does. I believe her husband Dean Wesley Smith does as well. They also write in other genres.
 

AW Admin

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Vonda McIntyre, Joan Vinge, Joanna Russ
 

aspirit

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Margaret Atwood
Paolo Bacigalupi
Hal Clement
Aliette de Bodard
Alaya Dawn Johnson
Cindy Pon
Carrie Vaughn

Are there authors who publish fantasy and science fiction under separate pen names? I can't imagine why someone would that, unless they only wrote along the lines of fantasy for children and erotic science fiction for adults. Then the divide would really be kidlit vs erotic adult fiction, not fantasy vs science fiction.
 

Brightdreamer

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Are there authors who publish fantasy and science fiction under separate pen names? I can't imagine why someone would that, unless they only wrote along the lines of fantasy for children and erotic science fiction for adults. Then the divide would really be kidlit vs erotic adult fiction, not fantasy vs science fiction.

Sometimes, I believe it's a branding thing, possibly to move into a different subgenre or tweak sales. IIRC, Megan Lindholm and Robin Hobb - both fantasy - are the same person. And Mira Grant (horror) and Seanan McGuire (fantasy) are one person.
 

indianroads

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[...]

Are there authors who publish fantasy and science fiction under separate pen names? I can't imagine why someone would that, unless they only wrote along the lines of fantasy for children and erotic science fiction for adults. Then the divide would really be kidlit vs erotic adult fiction, not fantasy vs science fiction.

If Stephen King wrote a bedtime story for small children, I could see him using a pen name.

I feel that there's a lot of bleed-over in these genres. Horror/supernatural stuff is seems strongly akin to Fantasy which fades into soft Science Fiction.
 

indianroads

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Stephen King does have a pen name, although in his case he doesn't really write in a different genre.

True. But in an interview I read he said that he did that to see if lightening would strike twice. It was as if he didn't trust that his success came from talent, and thought it might have been luck instead.
 

Roxxsmom

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Sometimes, I believe it's a branding thing, possibly to move into a different subgenre or tweak sales. IIRC, Megan Lindholm and Robin Hobb - both fantasy - are the same person. And Mira Grant (horror) and Seanan McGuire (fantasy) are one person.

Yeah, sometimes it's something an agent or publisher will recommend for rebranding. If the person is shifting to a very different style of fantasy, for instance. Or if someone's early work never got much traction sales wise, but they wrote something new that had a lot of potential. Katherine Addison published earlier fantasy work as Sarah Monette.

Ian Banks wrote fiction as Ian Banks and SF under Ian M Banks. Not a big change, but it let people know what genre a given book would be.

Nowadays, it's pretty hard to hide who you *really* are, even if writing under very different pen names, now that authors are expected to have extensive web presences and to attend cons and so on. Not like the old days when authors could keep different identities secret for years. Still, rebranding can work, and pen names that hide your gender (if writing in a genre or subgenre where some readers discriminate), or that hide your affiliation with a different genre some readers may sneer at, can make it easier to get browsing customers to take a second look at a title by a "new" author.
 
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