Mold or Mould?

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oarsman

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Is there any difference between mold and mould (other than the extra "u")?

For example,

"plaster is poured in the clay mould" or "plaster is poured in the clay mold"

I've seen it both ways.
 

Duncan J Macdonald

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oarsman said:
Is there any difference between mold and mould (other than the extra "u")?

For example,

"plaster is poured in the clay mould" or "plaster is poured in the clay mold"

I've seen it both ways.
The 'u' appears to be right-pondian usage. My dictionary gives 'mould' as a chiefly British variant of 'mold'.
 

veinglory

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As a Brit-influned Kiwi I would choose mould in this case and mold for what grows on rotten fruit--but I am aware that either is acceptable.
 

Sandi LeFaucheur

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The 'u' appears to be right-pondian usage. My dictionary gives 'mould' as a chiefly British variant of 'mold'.Funny, that! My dictionary says that "mold" is the US variant of "mould"!
icon7.gif

I wonder what it is that Americans have against the letter "U"?

By the way, I've searched and googled, and I can't find a definition for pondian. What does it mean? And is the opposite left-pondian or wrong-pondian?
 

JNLister

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Sandi LeFaucheur said:
The 'u' appears to be right-pondian usage. My dictionary gives 'mould' as a chiefly British variant of 'mold'.Funny, that! My dictionary says that "mold" is the US variant of "mould"!
icon7.gif

I wonder what it is that Americans have against the letter "U"?

By the way, I've searched and googled, and I can't find a definition for pondian. What does it mean? And is the opposite left-pondian or wrong-pondian?

I assume it's a reference to Britain (as in British English writers) being on the right-hand side of the Atlantic on a standard map.
 

Jamesaritchie

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JNLister said:
I assume it's a reference to Britain (as in British English writers) being on the right-hand side of the Atlantic on a standard map.



Yes, you got it. "Right pondsian" simply means someone who lives on teh right side of the big pond, as the Atlantic is often called.
 
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