If you aren't sure whether to self-publish, ask yourself what you want.

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Editing for authors: because every writer needs a good editor.

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Medievalist

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I'd say Konrath's success speaks to the fact that he clearly writes books that are read, and enjoyed by many people. I'm glad he was able to come in and set the record straight.

Except he didn't set the record straight. He mostly just said "unh-unh" and proceeded to name call.

The name calling is not OK.

It caused me to wade through his entire post history, which was revelatory. It's quite the narrative.
 

kaitie

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I think Uncle Jim's link to the post from 2007 says all that needs to be said.
 

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But if most of the sample can't be relied upon as valid since it's so easy to game the system, how can the average be reliable? I would think the average would be just as invalid and unreliable since it's derived from inaccurate data.

Because you have eliminated the outliers in your mind by accounting for what they are commenting on and their reliability. I don't have a problem identifying cheerleaders and idiots and then arriving at any merits of problems. "The average" is more representative of what most will say rather than the outliers, but if you have a lot of protest, or similar, ratings you are adjusting that in your mind.
 

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Because you have eliminated the outliers in your mind by accounting for what they are commenting on and their reliability. I don't have a problem identifying cheerleaders and idiots and then arriving at any merits of problems. "The average" is more representative of what most will say rather than the outliers, but if you have a lot of protest, or similar, ratings you are adjusting that in your mind.
Huh? No. Bad statistics. Throwing out data you see as non-representative of the average means you're skewing your result toward your predetermined assumptions about what that average will be.

You haven't quantified what you have, you haven't quantified what you've thrown out, and your reasons for throwing stuff out are highly subjective. This can't produce valid results.
 

badducky

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The thing that always seems strange to me is the consistent meme that one is either a traditionally published author or a self-published indie author.

Today, more than ever, that line has little meaning. Writers pass betwixt these categories with ease.

I don't think anyone can deny the power of publishers, but publishers have finite resources and there aren't really that many of them, these days, that can achieve the sort of market penetration that an author, such as myself, desires for his works of fiction. After these houses have passed on the book, yes, I write another book. But, I still have that work that I did, and maybe I know what good writing looks like, and maybe my friends know it, too.

There are so many stories of writers passing from one sphere of influence to another with ease, and of authors who perform simultaneous activity in both spheres with meaningful success in both. Those 1.99 short story sales can add up. Not to millions, but to more than nothing.

As far as the pricing goes, I don't really care what the price point of an eBook is if the downloaded sample is dreck. Beyond that? Publishers are uniquely positioned to justify their higher price point because they have the ability to hire people to make sure their eBooks actually look really good in every individual device, come clean and polished, and maybe even have a few value add-ins as tablet devices make interactivity possible. This is better and more valuable than what I do when I shovel my stuff through Smashwords praying for no autovetter errors. I'd work with a publisher everytime if I knew I'd get a better end product out of it. Money-shmoney: show me the art that's created and if it is beautiful art and if what publishers have done to the art makes it worth it to my readers.

(Some publishers haven't figured that one out, and some have. I've seen some ugly eBooks that shouldn't have been that ugly...)

Still, the collapse of Borders decreased the number of places to shelve trade paperbacks for sale and the result is a major shift in the traditional midlist upwards. The bottom rung of the midlist, and much of the middle, is probably already gone. Even before this computerized ordering systems (a.k.a. the death spiral) has been eating careers. Self-publishing is one way to fight back, and prove a marketplace for authors that worked within the system and did not prevail inside of it. Self-publishing is also a way for authors to maintain interesting artistic freedoms and to pursue projects that might only be interested to enough people to make the smaller scale viable (in my case, the very small scale).

I suspect that in the future that is emerging at the moment, each project will be different, much like each film or musician is approached differently by the business of the artistic field. Much like some things are short stories and others are blog entries, some projects will be good for publishers and some projects will be better self-published as an eBook. It isn't about money, either, because publishers can help you make more of that. It's about where the book can connect successfully with the most readers.

I've got a couple projects to which I expect sales below 20, total, in my entire life. It doesn't make them any less important to me as an author, or in the development of whatever sort of writer I'm going to be someday. Self-publishing, either by blogging them, or putting them up as eBooks, is one way of addressing my desire to write letters to the world, and try to make it a better world, even if these projects are not commercially viable.
 
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tim290280

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Huh? No. Bad statistics. Throwing out data you see as non-representative of the average means you're skewing your result toward your predetermined assumptions about what that average will be.

You haven't quantified what you have, you haven't quantified what you've thrown out, and your reasons for throwing stuff out are highly subjective. This can't produce valid results.
I'm sorry but you clearly haven't understood the term outlier. I am a scientist and understand data analysis better than most.
 

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I'm sorry but you clearly haven't understood the term outlier. I am a scientist and understand data analysis better than most.

Ah, you're a scientist.

Can you explain again what you mean by "outlier", and how it relates to your views in this thread?
 

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Ah, you're a scientist.

Can you explain again what you mean by "outlier", and how it relates to your views in this thread?
Outlier, as in data that is outside the norm and if it meets the definition of rubbish data can be discarded (in science you have to justify why you are discarding data and it is usually only justified in sampling error). This was why I mentioned the idiots and cheerleaders. I'm sure we've all read the reviews that were clearly from the author's mother (5 star) and the others that were written by illiterate goats (1 star). These data points are biasing the sample, as they essentially aren't real reviews.

I'm sure the author's mother genuinely thinks the author has written a terrific book, but they are probably also just as happy that their grown up child isn't still wetting their bed. We can't trust that review.

The illiterate goats are an interesting book consumer. They are often shocked to find that when they read "Death and Dismemberment" it contained violence and horror. They are also often confused by sentences that use more than three words or words with more than two syllables. Safe to say that I'm not going to have much in common with them and their opinion.
 

Sheryl Nantus

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The illiterate goats are an interesting book consumer. They are often shocked to find that when they read "Death and Dismemberment" it contained violence and horror. They are also often confused by sentences that use more than three words or words with more than two syllables. Safe to say that I'm not going to have much in common with them and their opinion.

A little condescending towards the readers, isn't it? I may not agree with a one-star review but I can respect the reader's right to put it up. They've paid for the book and if they want to put up a negative review, well... at least they're taking the time to put one up. I may not like it but at least they're participating in the process by leaving a review.

What are you a scientist "of", BTW?

:)
 

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Sample sets include populations, which identify subsets. In this case family and friends are a population. Reciprocal attaboys and retaliations from other authors are populations. The general targeted readership is a population. To discard an outlier, you should first, if possible, identify the population to which it belongs and determine whether that population falls outside of the group you wish to sample.

The problem is to identify them. Simply choosing the extreme outliers doesn't always provide reliable subsets. But, in this case, it's often all we have.

Arbitrarily discarding outliers is like the scoring in some athletic competitions in which they automatically discard the highest and lowest scores of the judges.

If I cannot decide based on reviews, I'll read the online samples of a book. First few pages. That usually tells me whether I want more.
 

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The illiterate goats are an interesting book consumer. They are often shocked to find that when they read "Death and Dismemberment" it contained violence and horror. They are also often confused by sentences that use more than three words or words with more than two syllables. Safe to say that I'm not going to have much in common with them and their opinion.

It's been my experience that anyone fitting this description just doesn't read.
 

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Sample sets include populations, which identify subsets. In this case family and friends are a population. Reciprocal attaboys and retaliations from other authors are populations. The general targeted readership is a population. To discard an outlier, you should first, if possible, identify the population to which it belongs and determine whether that population falls outside of the group you wish to sample.

The problem is to identify them. Simply choosing the extreme outliers doesn't always provide reliable subsets. But, in this case, it's often all we have.

Arbitrarily discarding outliers is like the scoring in some athletic competitions in which they automatically discard the highest and lowest scores of the judges.

If I cannot decide based on reviews, I'll read the online samples of a book. First few pages. That usually tells me whether I want more.

I agree with what you're saying, but also, what if we're the outlier?

Let's say that general opinion on a book is that it's great, next best thing, everyone loves it. I read the same book and can't believe it was ever published and think it's the worst thing I've ever read.

I'm the outlier. I'm the one who disagrees with general consensus. It could be Twilight, it could be (for me) Piers Anthony, it could be any number of things. I've also noticed that a lot of books that are commercially popular are books that are considered by people around here to be terrible (Dan Brown gets a lot of slack).

How do we know which population we fit into? How do we know that our opinion is going to jive with the general opinion of everyone else?

That's why, generally speaking, I'd rather read a summary and decide from that whether or not I'd enjoy a book. I'm perfectly capable of loving books that other people hate and hating a book that other people love.
 

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Us as the outliers is an exception. That's what it means.

You should know whether your preferences are mainstream. I'd look not only at the text of the reviews to see why they like or dislike it but also at the other books they have reviewed.

Research can include only available data. Then, if you make the wrong decision because the data are incomplete, at least you can add to the data. Assuming the wrong decision was to buy the book, that is.
 

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A little condescending towards the readers, isn't it? I may not agree with a one-star review but I can respect the reader's right to put it up. They've paid for the book and if they want to put up a negative review, well... at least they're taking the time to put one up. I may not like it but at least they're participating in the process by leaving a review.

What are you a scientist "of", BTW?

:)
I would have said I was being condescending towards idiots. ;)

There's a brief bio on my blog. I've done research in a number of fields, but mainly plant science (nutrition).
Al Stevens said:
Sample sets include populations, which identify subsets. In this case family and friends are a population. Reciprocal attaboys and retaliations from other authors are populations. The general targeted readership is a population. To discard an outlier, you should first, if possible, identify the population to which it belongs and determine whether that population falls outside of the group you wish to sample.

The problem is to identify them. Simply choosing the extreme outliers doesn't always provide reliable subsets. But, in this case, it's often all we have.

Arbitrarily discarding outliers is like the scoring in some athletic competitions in which they automatically discard the highest and lowest scores of the judges.

If I cannot decide based on reviews, I'll read the online samples of a book. First few pages. That usually tells me whether I want more.
Which is what I said. You can't discard useful data, whether they are at the extremes or not. Outliers aren't necessarily the extremes they are data that isn't useful.
katie said:
It's been my experience that anyone fitting this description just doesn't read.
It's been my experience that it doesn't stop them having an opinion.:D
 

epublishabook

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Easy? There is no big round red EASY button included in self-publishing.

I've found it very challenging. Some will find it daunting, others impossible. I just decided to create a new self-published book for a contest, that is insanity mode-I nearly cried when I saw how fantastic last year's winners were-I'm really going to have to pull out all the stops on my typography to have a chance.

You have to make a lot of decisions, including "do it myself or hire it out". Not everyone is good at that. It is also expensive in terms of the self-publisher's time and/or the cost of out-sourcing what they can't do themselves.

You can't just get it out there, either. "If you build it, they will come," only works if you are trying to attract ghostly baseball players.

You need to do the marketing piece and that's where trade/commercial publishing has a big advantage, because if you don't know how to self-promote and market a product, self-publishing probably isn't for you.

...

Self-publishing isn't easy, it isn't cheap and there are no guarantees.

Focus

Actually, I came to the same conclusion. After my agent had to retire for personal reason before placing my ook, I decided to explore the self-publishing options. So I even opened a blog so that others could benefit from my researches results and also to enable me to interview self-published authors and get first hand information that way.

After 3 month of blogging - have fallen in love with that part, I just submitted my manuscript to an epublisher and am back to writer's favorite game - waiting for an answer :)
 

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The top hundred items in the Kindle store, 08May11, 1600 EDT.

A year ago I looked at the top hundred items in the Kindle store, and the top hundred books. Time to revisit the question, to see what a difference a year has made.

Top Hundred items in the Kindle Store, 12 May 2012, 1710 EDT. Self-published books are marked "SP."

1. Kindle Fire (Electronics)

2. Fifty Shades of Grey: Book One of the Fifty Shades Trilogy by E L James (Vintage (Random House))

3. Fifty Shades Darker: Book Two of the Fifty Shades Trilogy by E L James (Vintage (Random House))


4. Fifty Shades Freed: Book Three of the Fifty Shades Trilogy by E L James (Vintage)

5. Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins (The Final Book of The Hunger Games) (Scholastic Press)

6. Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins (The Second Book of the Hunger Games) (Scholastic Press)

7. Kindle Touch (Electronics)

8. Kindle (Electronics)

9. The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (Scholastic Paperbacks)

10. Fifty Shades Trilogy Bundle: Fifty Shades of Grey; Fifty Shades Darker; Fifty Shades Freed by E L James (Vintage (Random House))


11. The Witness by Nora Roberts (Penguin Publishing)

12. The Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne Collins (Scholastic Press)

13. The Innocent by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing (Hachette Book Group))

14. The Lucky One by Nicholas Sparks (Grand Central Publishing (Hachette Book Group))

15. Deadlocked: A Sookie Stackhouse Novel by Charlaine Harris (Ace (Penguin Publishing))

16. Guilty Wives by James Patterson and David Ellis (Little, Brown and Company (Hachette Book Group))

17. Kindle Touch 3G (Electronics)

18. On the Island by Tracey Garvis-Graves (Amazon Digital Services) SP

19. The Last Boyfriend: Book Two of the Inn BoonsBoro Trilogy by Nora Roberts (Penguin Publishing)

20. Kindle US Power Adapter (Electronics)

21. Calico Joe by John Grisham (Doubleday (Random House))

22. The Marriage Bargain (Marriage to a Billionaire) by Jennifer Probst (Entangled Publishing)

23. Amazon.com Gift Cards - E-mail Delivery (Amazon)

24. Kindle Keyboard 3G (Electronics)

25. Defending Jacob: A Novel by William Landay ( Delacorte Press (Random House))

26. Wrath & Righteousness by Chris Stewart (Mercury Ink)

27. Insurgent (Divergent) by Veronica Roth (HarperCollins Publishers)

28. The Serpent's Shadow (The Kane Chronicles, Book Three) by Rick Riordan (Disney Hyperion)

29. George R. R. Martin's A Game of Thrones 4-Book Bundle: A Song of Ice and Fire Series: A Game of Thrones, A Clash of Kings, A Storm of Swords, and A Feast for Crows (Song of Ice & Fire) by George R.R. Martin (Bantam (Random House))

30. A Game of Thrones: A Song of Ice and Fire: Book One by George R.R. Martin (Bantam (Random House))

31. She Can Run by Melinda Leigh (Montlake (Amazon))

32. 2-Year SquareTrade Warranty plus Accident Protection for Kindle Fire, US customers only (Accessory)

33. 11th Hour (Women's Murder Club) by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro (Little, Brown and Company (Hachette Book Group))

34. The Wind Through the Keyhole (Dark Tower) by Stephen King (Scribner (Simon and Schuster))

35. A Matter of Honor by Jeffrey Archer (St. Martin's Paperbacks (Macmillan))

36. A Dance with Dragons: A Song of Ice and Fire: Book Five by George R.R. Martin (Bantam (Random House))

37. The Long Way Home by Karen McQuestion (Amazon Publishing) SP

38. The Lost Years by Mary Higgins Clark (Simon & Schuster)

39. Stay Close by Harlan Coben (Dutton Adult (Penguin Publishing))

40. Let's Pretend This Never Happened: (A Mostly True Memoir) by Jenny Lawson (Putnam Adult (Penguin Publishing))

41. Betrayal: A Novel by Danielle Steel (Delacorte Press (Random House))

42. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest: Book 3 of the Millennium Trilogy (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard) by Stieg Larsson and Reg Keeland (Vintage (Random House))

43. What Doesn't Kill You by Iris Johansen (St. Martin's Press (Macmillan))

44. The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg (Random House)

45. Kindle Lighted Leather Cover, Black (Fits Kindle Keyboard) (Accessory)

46. A Clash of Kings: A Song of Ice and Fire: Book Two by George R.R. Martin (Bantam (Random House))

47. Divergent (Divergent Trilogy) by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books (HarperCollins))

48. The Girl Who Played with Fire (Millennium Trilogy, Book 2) by Stieg Larsson and Reg Keeland (Vintage (Random House))

49. The Shoemaker's Wife by Adriana Trigiani (Harper (HarperCollins))

50. Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House)

51. Unnatural Acts by Stuart Woods (Putnam Adult (Penguin))

52. Kindle Fire Lightweight MicroShell Folio Cover by Marware, Black (Accessory)

53. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson (Simon & Schuster)

54. Mrs. Kennedy and Me by Lisa McCubbin and Clint Hill (Gallery Books (Simon & Schuster))

55. A Night to Remember by Walter Lord and Nathaniel Philbrick (Open Road Iconic Ebooks)

56. Amazon Kindle Touch Lighted Leather Cover, Black (Accessory)

57. A Storm of Swords: A Song of Ice and Fire: Book Three by George R.R. Martin (Bantam (Random House))

58. Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man by Steve Harvey (HarperCollins)

59. The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo: Book 1 of the Millennium Trilogy by Stieg Larsson and Reg Keeland (Vintage)

60. The Help by Kathryn Stockett (Berkley (Penguin Publishing))

61. 11/22/63 by Stephen King (Scribner (Simon and Schuster))

62. Beautiful Disaster by Jamie McGuire (Jamie McGuire) SP

63. The Next Always: Book One of the Inn BoonsBoro Trilogy by Nora Roberts (Berkley (Penguin Publishing))

64. Sunrise Point (Virgin River) by Robyn Carr (Mira)

65. Kindle DX, Free 3G, 9.7" E Ink Display, 3G Works Globally (Electronics)

66. Zero Day by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing (Hachette))

67. The Lion, the Lamb, the Hunted: A Psychological Thriller by Andrew E. Kaufman (Straightline Press)

68. Lone Wolf by Jodi Picoult (Atria/Emily Bestler Books (Simon and Schuster))

69.Kill Shot (Mitch Rapp) by Vince Flynn (Atria/Emily Bestler Books (Simon and Schuster))

70. Escape from Camp 14: One Man's Remarkable Odyssey from North Korea to Freedom inthe West by Blaine Harden (Viking Adult (Penguin Publishing))

71. City of Lost Souls (Mortal Instruments) by Cassandra Clare (Margaret K. McElderry Books (Simon and Schuster))

72. Lifeboat No. 8: An Untold Tale of Love, Loss, and Surviving the Titanic (Kindle Single) by Elizabeth Kaye (Byliner Inc.)

73. Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter by Seth Grahame-Smith (Grand Central Publishing (Hachette))

74. The Presidents Club by Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy (Simon & Schuster)

75. Certified Refurbished Kindle Touch (Electronics)

76. Snake Skin: A Lucy Guardino FBI Thriller (Lucy Guardino FBI Thrillers, Book #1) by CJ Lyons (Legacy Books)

77. The Lifeboat: A Novel by Charlotte Rogan (Reagan Arthur Books (Hachette))

78. Bared to You: A Crossfire Novel by Sylvia Day (Sylvia Day) SP

79. No Turning Back (Kathleen Turner Series) by Tiffany Snow (Tiffany A. Snow) SP

80. A Feast for Crows: A Song of Ice and Fire: Book Four by George R.R. Martin (Bantam (Random House))

81. Come Home by Lisa Scottoline (St. Martin's Press (Macmillan))

82. Amazon Kindle Lighted Leather Cover, Black (Accessory)

83. The Paris Wife: A Novel by Paula Mclain (Ballantine Books (Random House))

84. Killing Lincoln: The Shocking Assassination that Changed America Forever by Martin Dugard and Bill O'Reilly (Henry Holt and Co (Macmillan))

85. Private Games by James Patterson and Mark Sullivan (Little, Brown and Company (Hachette))

86. Kindle Fire Charger / AC Adapter by Amazon (Accessory)

87. The Mongoliad: Book One (The Foreworld Saga) by Greg Bear, Neal Stephenson, Mark Teppo and Erik Bear (47North (Amazon))

88. BLOOD STAINED (Lucy Guardino FBI Thrillers, Book #2) by CJ Lyons (Legacy Books)

89. Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power by Rachel Maddow (Crown (Random House))

90. Riversong by Tess Hardwick (Booktrope)

91. Amazon Kindle Replacement USB Cable, White (Accessory)

92. The Passage of Power (The Years of Lyndon Johnson) by Robert A. Caro (Knopf (Random House))

93. Crystal Gardens by Amanda Quick (Putnam Adult (Penguin))

94. The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling (Little Brown (Hachette))

95. Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed (Knopf (Random House))

96. Heaven is for Real: A Little Boy's Astounding Story of His Trip to Heaven and Back by Todd Burpo, Sonja Burpo, Colton Burpo and Lynn Vincent (Thomas Nelson)

97. Victims: An Alex Delaware Novel by Jonathan Kellerman (Ballantine Books (Random House))

98. Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake by Anna Quindlen (Random House)

99. The Perfect Assassin by Ward Larsen (Oceanview Publishing)

100. Stolen Prey by John Sandford (Putnam Adult (Penguin))
 

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Five percent are self-published. Interesting.

ETA: My five percent is incomplete when you take into account the items James noted in his 2011 post (see post below this one for more details).

ETA: Fifteen of the items noted above have to do with Kindle devices or operating a Kindle and one was for an Amazon gift card. That brings the number of actual titles down to 84. With five self-published titles, that makes six percent. Down ten percent from last year and no self-published books by John Locke.
 
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Just pulling up 2011 figures for easy comparison to 2012 figures.

Of those top hundred items, six are Kindles, or Kindle accessories and software, leaving 94 items to download to your device.

Of the remaining 94, 10 are subscriptions to magazines, newspapers, and, in one case, a blog. (I'll count that blog as self-published, for 10% of the total subscriptions.)

Of the 84 books: 14 (16%) are self-published.

(And of those 14 self-published books, over half (8; that is, 57%) are by John Locke.)

The take-away lesson?

If you want to do well on the Kindle, be published by Random House.
 

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Of the hundred items, 16 are Kindles, or Kindle accessories or Amazon gift certificates, leaving 84 books.

This is the same as a year ago: 84 actual books were in the top 100 items.

What's missing are subscriptions and software.

Of those 84 books, 5 (5.9%)are self-published, down from 14 (16%) last year.

A year ago I said:

The take-away lesson?

If you want to do well on the Kindle, be published by Random House.
That's still true. Today 22 of the top 100 items in the Kindle store (26% of the books) are from one or another of Random House's imprints.
 
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Let's bring up the next sixteen books, to make an even 100 downloadable books:

1. Wool Omnibus Edition (Wool 1 - 5) by Hugh Howey (Broad Reach Publishing)

2. The Black Stiletto by Raymond Benson (Oceanview Publishing)

3. The Vow: The True Events that Inspired the Movie by Krickitt Carpenter and Kim Carpenter (B&H Books)

4. She Wore Only White by Dörthe Binkert and Lesley Schuldt (AmazonCrossing)

5. Promise Me This by Cathy Gohlke (Tyndale House Publishers)

6. Lover Reborn: A Novel of the Black Dagger Brotherhood by J.R. Ward (NAL (Penguin))

7. Deep in the Heart by Staci Stallings (Spirit Light Books)

8. The Big Miss: My Years Coaching Tiger Woods by Hank Haney (Crown Archetype (Random House))

9.Bad Doctor by John Locke (Telemachus Press) SP

10. In One Person by John Irving (Simon & Schuster)

11. The Beginner's Goodbye by Anne Tyler (Knopf (Random House))

12. Bring Up the Bodies: A Novel (John Macrae Book) by Hilary Mantel (Henry Holt (Macmilla))

13. A Week at the Beach by Virginia Jewel (Amazon Digital Services) SP

14. Barely Breathing (The Breathing Series) by Rebecca Donovan (Amazon Digital Services) SP

15. Only the Truth by Pat Brown (Pat Brown) SP

16. Tiger (New Species, Book Seven) by Laurann Dohner (Ellora's Cave Publishing)

 

James D. Macdonald

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Taking it out to the top 100 books, we add another three SP works, for a total of 8 of 100, or 8%. A year ago it was 20%.

Make of it what you will.

I intend to repeat the experiment a year from now. We'll see what another twelve months brings.
 

GregB

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Hugh Howey self-published all the Wool books and the omnibus, just FYI. Broad Reach Publishing may be the name he chose to use as the publsher.

Plus, I see four "SP" in addition to WOOL, not three. I wonder if any of the others with publishers are actually self-published?

Howey just signed a film deal with Ridley Scott, and Oscar-winning screenwriter Steve Zaillian attached (Schindler's List, Gangs of New York, Moneyball, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo).
 

merrihiatt

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Plus, I see four "SP" in addition to WOOL, not three. I wonder if any of the others with publishers are actually self-published?

Howey just signed a film deal with Ridley Scott, and Oscar-winning screenwriter Steve Zaillian attached (Schindler's List, Gangs of New York, Moneyball, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo).

Great news!!! Way to go, Hugh!
 
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