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MissJones89

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I have a question for you Hungarians (or Hungarian speakers):

How do you say: I love you and my little thief ?
 

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I caught the jó estét :D And it makes me happy, missing Baja and Budapest.

Jó napot kívánok :)

Otherwise I used German or English. Hungarian is darned hard!
 

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I love you and my little thief
"Szeretlek téged (I love you) és a kis tolvajomat (and my little thief)."

Well. If that thief is that thief... the stealing thief, this is the exact translation for your sentence (I don't know any other meaning of that word. Maybe you thought for something else in english, but I don't see any sense in this sentence (With the exception if that little thief is a nickname.). May I ask what does that little thief if meaning in your sentence?

missing Baja and Budapest.
And Hungary is missing you. :)

Jó napot kívánok
Neked is nagyon szép napot kivánok, Backslash! ;)
 
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MissJones89

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"Szeretlek téged (I love you) és a kis tolvajomat (and my little thief)."

Well. If that thief is that thief... the stealing thief, this is the exact translation for your sentence (I don't know any other meaning of that word. Maybe you thought for something else in english, but I don't see any sense in this sentence (With the exception if that little thief is a nickname.). May I ask what does that little thief if meaning in your sentence?

Is it possible to just say "Szeretlek" or do you need both words?
And my little thief is meant as an endearing nickname for a young woman, who is a thief. Does that change anything?
I was thinking that maybe little thief would suffice sometimes, so what would that be? (Can't really tell which words mean what. Other than tolvajomat which must be thief, right? ;))

Thanks! :)
 

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Actually the word "Szeretlek", such as every other word in the Hungarian grammar system can be used on various and dozens of ways as it's always depending from the situation itself.

I love you = Én szeretlek téged (1:1 translation, I = Én, Love = Szeret, You = Te. Now in the Hungarian grammar different situations are giving different endings to the words, which is making every word, every situation easier to understand, even without descriptions (In English you must describe everything with I, You, He/she/it, this and that, etc, etc...). In Hungarian the words are changing, transforming for every possible situation. This is making Hungarian a bit more advanced language then most of the others and the primary reason why this is the one of the very few languages where we don't have to call people on their names so many times in dialogues (Unlike in English where you're calling everyone on their name rapidly in a conversation, or you must refering at the other person continuously as "you" in a dialogue. This is not necessary in Hungarian.).

Now, here we can leave the "Én" from the translation, because you're telling this sentence to a person directly. Leaving this word is immediately changing "Szeret" to "Szeretlek", which is making it much more personal, plus the "Én" also can be abandonned as it's already appears in this "Szeretlek" as the word itself get it's "I" personal expansion. "Téged" also can be abandonned as the word "Szeretlek" is not just containing the "I = Én", but it's also containing the "you = te", which in this language is rather "téged" due to the structure of the sentence.

So in overall, due to the structure of the sentence, while the 1:1 translation above is correct, as your approach to this sentence is full with emotions, your approach is also correct. So, the translation also can be this, just as you wrote...

I love you = Szeretlek (Also a 1 by 1 translation, but it's the much more personal one).

The first translation above is the 1:1, the formal, the one below is the one full with emotions. But ONLY in that case if want to use it as a seperate sentence. But see the edit part below, why you can't use it on this way, without the "téged".

And my little thief is meant as an endearing nickname for a young woman, who is a thief. Does that change anything?
Nope. In this case the translation is correct for that part.

Other than tolvajomat which must be thief, right?
Actually tolvaj = thief. "Tolvajomat" can be translated as "My thief", but as the words are transforming again to leave all the my, yours, etc, etc... it's already containing "My" in the transformed words. So "tolvajomat" is the correct translation, but it's not meaning "Thief", but it's "My thief" in general. And the little = kis.

But there are various ways to translate this as if you want to make it to a mocking, "My little thief"'s translation is already "Tolvajocskám", which is already containing "My", "Little" and "Thief" in this one word. But this is the mocking, have a quite different, mocking approach in it's tone, so don't use this one.

EDIT: One last thing what I forgot. As you're using "Szeretlek" in an expanded sentence where you're also referring to someone else too, there you have two + one options.

1. "Szeretlek téged és a kis tolvajomat." (In this version you must use the formal as you don't want to give different love to the two different person. You're not making difference between the first person and the little thief. In this case the formal should be applied with the word, "téged".

2. "Szeretlek, és a kis tolvajomat is." (That comma is necessary if you want to leave the word "téged". The comma is giving a weight for the first part, the "szeretlek", and then you can leave "téged". But only in this case if you're intending to use the sentence on the way you planned. At the end, the "is" is meaning "too". So the pure translation for this second option is "I love you... and my little thief too.". If you want the 1:1 translation, you must use the "téged" if you want the sentence to sound really nice and personal for both person. In this second version the first person gets much more love via the sentence and the "little thief" gets a "secondary", less personal, rather formal love.).

Bonus version. The possible expansion is in red, but as we're using some phrase a bit different, the red are not necessary in this version at all (If the reader already knows who the other in the "both".).

"Szeretlek mindkettőtöket; téged és a kis tolvajomat is."
Dry translation: "I love you both; you and my little thief."

Essence: no difference between the two person, same love applies for both, and it's also personal. But as I wrote above, the reader must know who to you refer in this sentence. As there are two person mentioned, the "Szeretlek mindkettőtöket" is good.
 
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MissJones89

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Thank you so much for helping me out, Freelancer! :) Still have a few questions, though, if you don't mind..

I love you = Szeretlek (Also a 1 by 1 translation, but it's the much more personal one).

So if a guy were to say "see you later sweetie, love you" (or something similar but with "love you" at the end) to his girlfriend, he could say:
"See you later sweetie, szeretlek"?
Or would szeretlek have to be in a sentence on its own?

Actually tolvaj = thief. "Tolvajomat" can be translated as "My thief", but as the words are transforming again to leave all the my, yours, etc, etc... it's already containing "My" in the transformed words. So "tolvajomat" is the correct translation, but it's not meaning "Thief", but it's "My thief" in general. And the little = kis.

Is it possible to say e.g.: "You're crazy, kis tolvajomat" - meaning you're crazy, my little thief ? And could the guy use kis tolvajomat in a sentence on its own where it would still mean "my little thief"?

But there are various ways to translate this as if you want to make it to a mocking, "My little thief"'s translation is already "Tolvajocskám", which is already containing "My", "Little" and "Thief" in this one word. But this is the mocking, have a quite different, mocking approach in it's tone, so don't use this one.

Wow, I had no idea Hungarian was that complicated. It's so cool how many possibilities you can get just by changing or adding a small part of a word!

Another quick question, Hungarians always roll on the "r" sound, right?
 

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Thank you so much for helping me out, Freelancer! :) Still have a few questions, though, if you don't mind..
No problem.

So if a guy were to say "see you later sweetie, love you" (or something similar but with "love you" at the end) to his girlfriend, he could say: "See you later sweetie, szeretlek"?
Or would szeretlek have to be in a sentence on its own?
Yes. It should be in a different sentence. The 1:1 translation is:

"Később találkozunk szívem. Szeretlek."

We used to divide the sentence to two to give much more weight for the word "I love you".

Is it possible to say e.g.: "You're crazy, kis tolvajomat" - meaning you're crazy, my little thief ? And could the guy use kis tolvajomat in a sentence on its own where it would still mean "my little thief"?
No. In this case the "Kis tolvajomat" is changing to "Kis tolvajom", because of the surrounding environment. The translation for this sentence is: "Őrült vagy kis tolvajom.", but it sounds a bit strange, even on Hungarian, so the order of the sentence should be changed.

So the translation for this: "Te kis tolvajom, őrült vagy." It sounds a bit cynic even on Hungarian, but this is the correct translation.

Wow, I had no idea Hungarian was that complicated. It's so cool how many possibilities you can get just by changing or adding a small part of a word!
Yeah, it can be hard, but it's a very flexible language. It sounds hard and also hard to speak because of the different alphabet. English is using 26 letters in the alphabet, while we're using 44.

Another quick question, Hungarians always roll on the "r" sound, right?
Only if you speak with a burr. :D Not at all. Unlike other languages, the Hungarian language is not relies on any sound, such as R or others. The sounding is also flexible because the "tone of the words" are coming from the word, from the sentence structure or even from the tone of the sentence itself.

If you have any other questions, feel free to ask. :)
 
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Tepelus

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Wow, I had no idea Hungarian was that complicated. It's so cool how many possibilities you can get just by changing or adding a small part of a word!


I wanted to learn Hungarian once upon a time, but it's way to confusing for me, plus I don't know any Hungarians to help me out. I tried Romanian, learned some because I was married to a Romanian for a few years (things didn't work out) but couldn't grasp it very well. I did learn a few curse words...lol, but since it's been a few years I don't remember much. I just can't seem to grasp learning another language.

Oh, and Freelancer, you and Backslash may get some translation questions from me as well in the future for my WIP. ;)
 

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Yes. It should be in a different sentence. The 1:1 translation is:

"Később találkozunk szívem. Szeretlek."

We used to divide the sentence to two to give much more weight for the word "I love you".

The MC's boyfriend is half Hungarian/half American. So I'm thinking of having him use a few words/phrases in Hungarian in an English sentence. But he would still use Szeretlek in a sentence on its own, right?
How would he say: "I love you, little thief" in Hungarian?

No. In this case the "Kis tolvajomat" is changing to "Kis tolvajom", because of the surrounding environment. The translation for this sentence is: "Őrült vagy kis tolvajom.", but it sounds a bit strange, even on Hungarian, so the order of the sentence should be changed.
So the translation for this: "Te kis tolvajom, őrült vagy." It sounds a bit cynic even on Hungarian, but this is the correct translation.

So maybe that doesn't really work. Cynic wasn't really what I was aiming for ;)

Yeah, it can be hard, but it's a very flexible language. It sounds hard and also hard to speak because of the different alphabet. English is using 26 letters in the alphabet, while we're using 44.

WOW! 44 letters, that's a lot! I guess they give the language a lot of nuances and make it really complicated for a non-native speaker to learn.
We have 28 in Danish, but from what I've heard it's an extremely difficult language to learn as well.

Only if you speak with a burr. :D Not at all. Unlike other languages, the Hungarian language is not relies on any sound, such as R or others. The sounding is also flexible because the "tone of the words" are coming from the word, from the sentence structure or even from the tone of the sentence itself.
So if you have a word with an r sound in it, you wouldn't roll on it? Or you could, but you wouldn't have to?
Say, if a boy spent most of his childhood speaking Hungarian, would it seem odd if he rolled on the r's when speaking English?
 

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In my experience (which means no actual linguistic training), the r comes from a different part of the mouth, but it's not a rolled r. It's not like a Spanish, French, or German r, I can say with confidence. Dialects may matter; dunno :)
 

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The MC's boyfriend is half Hungarian/half American. So I'm thinking of having him use a few words/phrases in Hungarian in an English sentence. But he would still use Szeretlek in a sentence on its own, right?
How would he say: "I love you, little thief" in Hungarian?
Yep. We used to use it in a standalone sentence. There are few exceptions when we're adding some kind nick after it.

"Szeretlek drágám." = I love you darling.
"Szeretlek szívem." = I love you sweetheart.

But in standard cases it's used to be a stand alone sentence, simply "Szeretlek.".

The major problem when someone, a non-Hungarian is trying to use Hungarian phrases, based on English phrases... they're trying to translate the English phrases to Hungarian. That's not working as we have quite different phrases which may sound awkward in English (My Canadian co-writer/editor also used to ask what does it really mean as in English those sentences sounds weird. And her husband's family is also Hungarian, so she is used to it.).

If you need phrases, list a few in English and I'll try to write some similar in Hungarian, which are not going to be translations, rather their Hungarian matches. Or if you want dialogues, write me those sentences in English and I'm gladly translate them to Hungarian.

WOW! 44 letters, that's a lot! I guess they give the language a lot of nuances and make it really complicated for a non-native speaker to learn.
Actually we give the language a lot of nuances. I directly wrote we as I'm also a Hungarian. :) But it's not that complicated at all. At least not for a Native Hungarian. The translations used to be hard as we have quite more words for many things that cannot be translated for example to English at all.

Say, if a boy spent most of his childhood speaking Hungarian, would it seem odd if he rolled on the r's when speaking English?
Nope. That's Russian. I'm a native Hungarian speaker and I have American and British English accent when I'm speaking in English (It's depending from my mood as I can change my accent anytime.). Our language is giving a chance to have a chance to "emulate" the accents of other languages. i.e. I can speak in English with Russian accent too. Now that accent is using heavy Rs. We used to speak with heavy Rs if we want to, but it's not depending from the dialect or from our language. It's depending from our mood. :)

In my experience (which means no actual linguistic training), the r comes from a different part of the mouth, but it's not a rolled r. It's not like a Spanish, French, or German r, I can say with confidence. Dialects may matter; dunno :)
The difference is... English speakers are using R, just as they're pronouncing the word "ARE". Our R sounds as "AIR".

Oh, and Freelancer, you and Backslash may get some translation questions from me as well in the future for my WIP. ;)
Not a problem Tepelus. I'll be here. :)
 
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SaraP

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About the 44 letters in the alphabet ... I'm curious: do you count the á as a separate letter from the a, for example? Is that why you have so many?
 

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Yes. This is our alphabet...

a, á, b, c, cs, d, dz, dzs, e, é, f, g, gy, h, i, í, j, k, l, ly, m, n, ny, o, ó, ö, ő, p, q, r, s, sz, t, ty, u, ú, ü, ű, v, w, x, y, z, zs

Also ancient Hungarian using a bit different alphabet and quite different letters. In that case the words and sentences must be read from right to left, but that's a different story. The alphabet above applies for modern Hungarian with Latin letters, words and sentences must be read from left to right, but sometimes we're using ancient Hungarian too.
 
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SaraP

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Interesting.

We don't count letters with accents as separate letters, otherwise we would have about 38 letters in our alphabet instead of just 23. Again, out of curiosity, do they all have different names?
 

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They're not different accents. They sounds different and they have different purpose. Actually these 44 letters are that a human mouth effectively can form and give a voice, a tone for it. i.e. English is using more letters to shape a single letter tone. We're using one letter for each of these tones.

Here is an example: "Yes." That S at the end is a different "S" tone than the "S" tone what you use in "Sure.". The "S" tone in "Yes" is actually our "SZ" letter. The "S" in "Sure" is a different "S" tone which is our "S" tone and letter. With this all of our words are seems as they sounds in Hungarian. In English, written words may sound different as they seems due to the lack of those letters what we have.

Other example: The pronunciation of Germany... that G sounds as "DZS" in pronunciation, while the G in Goal is our "G" tone and letter. The two or more "E" in Eeeek is our "Í" as it's one tone again, so we're using one letter for it. The CH in Cherry is our "CS". You're using two different letters for that one, while we're using one letter for that tone.

The only thing that we're not listing in our alphabet are the very rare letters, such as CCS, GGY, LLY, NNY, SSZ, TTY, TZ. These are rare letters in any tone and we're calling them as expansions of the original letters, such as CS, GY, LY, NY, etc, etc... So these are not part of our alphabet, but may appear in our words in very rare cases. They're showing you're expanding the tone in that word and it's also making difference between two words with similar pronunciation. Such as Megy (To go) or Meggy (Cherry / Sour Cherry).
 
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MissJones89

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Yep. We used to use it in a standalone sentence. There are few exceptions when we're adding some kind nick after it.

"Szeretlek drágám." = I love you darling.
"Szeretlek szívem." = I love you sweetheart.

But in standard cases it's used to be a stand alone sentence, simply "Szeretlek.".
Oh, that's great! I think I'll use both kinds :)

Freelancer said:
The major problem when someone, a non-Hungarian is trying to use Hungarian phrases, based on English phrases... they're trying to translate the English phrases to Hungarian. That's not working as we have quite different phrases which may sound awkward in English (My Canadian co-writer/editor also used to ask what does it really mean as in English those sentences sounds weird. And her husband's family is also Hungarian, so she is used to it.).

If you need phrases, list a few in English and I'll try to write some similar in Hungarian, which are not going to be translations, rather their Hungarian matches. Or if you want dialogues, write me those sentences in English and I'm gladly translate them to Hungarian.

Thanks a lot! I will look at my story and see if there are any place where I could add some Hungarian sentences instead. I have a feeling it would add more depth to a half-Hungarian character if he actually speaks a little Hungarian at some point - or is that just me?

Freelancer said:
Nope. That's Russian. I'm a native Hungarian speaker and I have American and British English accent when I'm speaking in English (It's depending from my mood as I can change my accent anytime.). Our language is giving a chance to have a chance to "emulate" the accents of other languages. i.e. I can speak in English with Russian accent too. Now that accent is using heavy Rs. We used to speak with heavy Rs if we want to, but it's not depending from the dialect or from our language. It's depending from our mood. :)

Wow, multiple accents! That's pretty cool! So if a Hungarian rolled on the 'r', it would be a deliberate choice? But it wouldn't be an effort for you?

They're not different accents. They sounds different and they have different purpose. Actually these 44 letters are that a human mouth effectively can form and give a voice, a tone for it. i.e. English is using more letters to shape a single letter tone. We're using one letter for each of these tones.

Here is an example: "Yes." That S at the end is a different "S" tone than the "S" tone what you use in "Sure.". The "S" tone in "Yes" is actually our "SZ" letter. The "S" in "Sure" is a different "S" tone which is our "S" tone and letter. With this all of our words are seems as they sounds in Hungarian. In English, written words may sound different as they seems due to the lack of those letters what we have.

Other example: The pronunciation of Germany... that G sounds as "DZS" in pronunciation, while the G in Goal is our "G" tone and letter. The two or more "E" in Eeeek is our "Í" as it's one tone again, so we're using one letter for it. The CH in Cherry is our "CS". You're using two different letters for that one, while we're using one letter for that tone.

The only thing that we're not listing in our alphabet are the very rare letters, such as CCS, GGY, LLY, NNY, SSZ, TTY, TZ. These are rare letters in any tone and we're calling them as expansions of the original letters, such as CS, GY, LY, NY, etc, etc... So these are not part of our alphabet, but may appear in our words in very rare cases. They're showing you're expanding the tone in that word and it's also making difference between two words with similar pronunciation. Such as Megy (To go) or Meggy (Cherry / Sour Cherry).

Wouldn't that make Hungarian easier to read and speak as soon as a person had learned all the sounds in the alphabet?
In Danish, we have a lot of words that are spelled different compared to the pronunciation. But if each of your letters only represent one sound, then it would make it way easier to pronounce the words correctly, right?

This is all really interesting! I didn't really know anything about Hungarian until now ;)
 

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Thanks a lot! I will look at my story and see if there are any place where I could add some Hungarian sentences instead. I have a feeling it would add more depth to a half-Hungarian character if he actually speaks a little Hungarian at some point - or is that just me?
That would make your character life like. Hungarians are proud for their language and we used to use it in some cases, regardless we must speak on a different language. i.e. cursing is used to be in Hungarian as we have a bit larger arsenal. Or we used to revert sometimes to Hungarian when we can't find an appropriate word for something in a different language as that word is not existing in that language (I also used to do this sometimes, when I start to speak in English and when I arrive to a word what for there is no English word at all, then I accidentally revert back to Hungarian for that one word.). i.e. my novel's title, "Crystal Shade" is described with two words in English. In Hungarian we have one word for it, "Kristályárny", which is basically meaning the very same as "Crystal = Kristály", "Shade = Árny", yet we have one unique word to describe this.

Wow, multiple accents! That's pretty cool! So if a Hungarian rolled on the 'r', it would be a deliberate choice? But it wouldn't be an effort for you?
It's not an effort as we're using the tones itself and that is giving us the chance to speak on different dialects and accents anytime. i.e. in Hungarian we used to speak sometimes with different accents for fun (My former girlfriend is always changed her accent when she reverted to her hilarious comedic presentation. It was not an effort for her, but she made it for fun.).

Wouldn't that make Hungarian easier to read and speak as soon as a person had learned all the sounds in the alphabet?
Maybe. Actually the primary problem is that the mouth of non-Hungarian speakers must get used to shape these tones. For me it's easy, but it's my native language.

In Danish, we have a lot of words that are spelled different compared to the pronunciation. But if each of your letters only represent one sound, then it would make it way easier to pronounce the words correctly, right?
Same as above. Maybe. I can't tell you this with 100% as it's my native language. But I know few people, whose learned Hungarian and speak almost like a Hungarian. But non-natives has only 1-2% chance to speak as a native Hungarian due to the difficulty of the language. We can hear from the tone who is just learned this language and who is a speaking it as a native.

This is all really interesting! I didn't really know anything about Hungarian until now ;)
We gladly speak about our culture. It's a beautiful and strange culture and the language is a unique one, has no similar at all. Some even call it exotic i.e. My Spanish friends used to call it as an exotic language, while I call theirs as an exotic one. So it depends from our point of view, but we used to be proud for who we're.
 
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The pronunciation is so hard for me, but there is not the leeway you'll find in some other languages. If you are off a bit, it must sound entirely different to Hungarian ears.

Take the town I lived in during the week. Baja. 4 letters. But you have to say the A's with your mouth held entirely differently than in English or folks will ask you to repeat several times. 4 letters, lol :D

The a isn't far off from how you say the a in father. But you must hold your mouth differently and make a stronger sound. I don't think we have the equivalent sound at all. It sounds enough like father to me, lol ;)

If you use the a in father to say 'France' in French, folks still understand it. Not so, Hungarian.
 

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That would make your character life like. Hungarians are proud for their language and we used to use it in some cases, regardless we must speak on a different language. i.e. cursing is used to be in Hungarian as we have a bit larger arsenal. Or we used to revert sometimes to Hungarian when we can't find an appropriate word for something in a different language as that word is not existing in that language (I also used to do this sometimes, when I start to speak in English and when I arrive to a word what for there is no English word at all, then I accidentally revert back to Hungarian for that one word.). i.e. my novel's title, "Crystal Shade" is described with two words in English. In Hungarian we have one word for it, "Kristályárny", which is basically meaning the very same as "Crystal = Kristály", "Shade = Árny", yet we have one unique word to describe this.

I actually really like the idea of swearing in Hungarian! That'd definitely fit with the character's personality.
Maybe you could provide some words/phrases equivalent to "fuck", "shit" and "go to hell"?

Freelancer said:
It's not an effort as we're using the tones itself and that is giving us the chance to speak on different dialects and accents anytime. i.e. in Hungarian we used to speak sometimes with different accents for fun (My former girlfriend is always changed her accent when she reverted to her hilarious comedic presentation. It was not an effort for her, but she made it for fun.).

That's so awesome! I wish I could choose my accent, depending on the situation/mood.

Freelancer said:
Same as above. Maybe. I can't tell you this with 100% as it's my native language. But I know few people, whose learned Hungarian and speak almost like a Hungarian. But non-natives has only 1-2% chance to speak as a native Hungarian due to the difficulty of the language. We can hear from the tone who is just learned this language and who is a speaking it as a native.

So it isn't really easy at all to learn, haha. But it must be a fun challenge to try and form the different sounds in your mouth when you're not a native speaker.

Freelancer said:
We gladly speak about our culture. It's a beautiful and strange culture and the language is a unique one, has no similar at all. Some even call it exotic i.e. My Spanish friends used to call it as an exotic language, while I call theirs as an exotic one. So it depends from our point of view, but we used to be proud for who we're.

What in particular is very Hungarian? And what are you proud of?

The pronunciation is so hard for me, but there is not the leeway you'll find in some other languages. If you are off a bit, it must sound entirely different to Hungarian ears.

Take the town I lived in during the week. Baja. 4 letters. But you have to say the A's with your mouth held entirely differently than in English or folks will ask you to repeat several times. 4 letters, lol :D

The a isn't far off from how you say the a in father. But you must hold your mouth differently and make a stronger sound. I don't think we have the equivalent sound at all. It sounds enough like father to me, lol ;)

If you use the a in father to say 'France' in French, folks still understand it. Not so, Hungarian.

But you speak some Hungarian then? Even if it's a really complex language ;)
 

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I know a lot of names for food and groceries, lol! If you point randomly, you always get sausages :D I lived there too long for sausages every night ;)

I learned you don't say the English words 'bus' or 'cookie'. Especially 'bus'!
 

MissJones89

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I know a lot of names for food and groceries, lol! If you point randomly, you always get sausages :D I lived there too long for sausages every night ;)

I learned you don't say the English words 'bus' or 'cookie'. Especially 'bus'!

Haha! I guess too many sausages would make you learn some words for other kinds of food!

Why not bus and cookie?
 

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You have to say 'Autobus' and still not pronounce the 'bus' part the English way because it means f**k or maybe a less extreme curseword for the same.

'Cookie' means penis. Or willy or something. Not so rude, just don't ask if they want one like one of my bosses did ;)
 

MissJones89

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You have to say 'Autobus' and still not pronounce the 'bus' part the English way because it means f**k or maybe a less extreme curseword for the same.

'Cookie' means penis. Or willy or something. Not so rude, just don't ask if they want one like one of my bosses did ;)

Haha! Your boss asked for a penis :D Did they stare at him in puzzlement?
 

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:ROFL: It happened before I got there, but it had become a running joke by then. Every new person who didn't speak Hungarian (we had a lot of folks from the former Yugoslavia) was told to ask that boss something about cookies :D

I constantly asked the wrong people words in Hungarian, too. At first, I forgot that a huge proportion of the folks there didn't know Hungarian, either. We were very close to the border, during the conflicts. OTOH, many of them spoke Hungarian from their grandmother, maybe. All of those historically moving borders brought together some very different languages!
 

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