How about a game?

editing_for_authors
Editing for authors: because every writer needs a good editor.

maxmordon

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The parents of my uncle's wife are Polish and during their trip to Venezuela, the guide told me to hold themselves, since some fierce curves ("curvas" in Spanish) were coming, but after so many waiting some twisted roads, the old Polish husband was deeply disappointed, why he was after they passed the curves?
 

Ehab.Ahmed

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True, Gabby. That bit about Buddha is very interesting! Thanks for sharing :)

Did you guess it right, Sara? lmao.
 

Ehab.Ahmed

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I did? Must've slipped my mind :tongue. Actually, I think I mentioned it in the Zombie Puta thread, lol.
 

Tocotin

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The parents of my uncle's wife are Polish and during their trip to Venezuela, the guide told me to hold themselves, since some fierce curves ("curvas" in Spanish) were coming, but after so many waiting some twisted roads, the old Polish husband was deeply disappointed, why he was after they passed the curves?

Because "kurwa" (pronounced curva) in Polish is the same as "puta" in Spanish? :troll

A "buta" is a pig in Japanese. Some people from the Kansai area of Japan also pronounce Buddha with a strong D, so strong it sounds like T.... so it can also be that

Hmm it's tricky. "Buddha" in Japanese has the "d" (sometimes sounding like "t") geminated or doubled, so it wouldn't sound like "buta".
 

Gabby

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When I lived in Japan, my Japanese mom was from Tokyo, my Japanes dad from Kyoto. We lived in Tokyo, but dad retained his accent.

When I visited Kyoto, I called them to say hi. Japanese dad got on the phone and said, "You gotta visit Nara. Is real close, and the butta there is gigantic!"

I repeated, "The butta? Er, a giant butta? Sure, I'll keep it in mind."
A giant pig. Riiight. Maybe it was a shrine or something. After that, I asked Japanese mom - she explained about the Buddha statue, which is gigantic and awesome.

But otousan did pronounce the "d" so strongly it sounded butta. Granted, not buta, but very very close enough!
 

Xelebes

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New round: This sometimes-crude English word is an innocuous, philematic word in Hungarian when spoken. What is the English word and what does the homophone mean in Hungarian?
 

SaraP

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Hmmmm, sounds intriguing. There is a post on the hungarian thread about a word that goes the other way around: apparently innocent in english, you shouldn't say it in Hungary.
 

Laquesi

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There's this word in Spanish, especially Venezuelan spanish means a rundown bus, but if you ask for a "buseta" in Portuguese it will surely earn you a slap from a woman and not an indication the bus stop!

I know a funny story about this, a friend witnessed it: some Argentinians where here in Brazil and the bus was just passing by the stop. They started running like crazy on the street yelling "corre la buseta, corre la buseta". There was a woman at the bus stop, and she was so scared she ran away. The guys just stood there, not understanding anything, and missed their bus, lol. I felt sorry for the woman, though. I'd probably run away too. :p
 

Laquesi

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No idea on the Hungarian one.
Can anyone guess this? A friend moved to Italy. He went to college carrying a notebook with a huge sticker on it that read 'Fica', after an international film festival that takes place in my home state every year. The word 'fica', in Portuguese, also means 'stay'. But in Italian, it's a vulgar term. Why did all my friend's classmates laugh and give him a new nickname?
 

Griesmeel

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Thanks for the heads up, I'll have one less chance of shocking my female Portuguese teacher. :)

The other one: poo? As from feces?
My apologies for if anyone feels I just stunk the place up. :)
 

Elizabeth George's book Write Away