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Have you been vaccinated for COVID-19?

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Editing for authors: because every writer needs a good editor.

Have you been vaccinated for COVID-19?

  • Yes both shots

    Votes: 59 79.7%
  • Just the first

    Votes: 10 13.5%
  • Nope. Not going to happen.

    Votes: 1 1.4%
  • Trying to get an appointment.

    Votes: 2 2.7%
  • Something else I'll explain in the comments.

    Votes: 1 1.4%
  • Not eligible yet where I am.

    Votes: 1 1.4%

  • Total voters
    74
  • This poll will close: .

Tazlima

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I got mine at one of those drive-through events. They actually sorta-kinda gave a choice. They did all one brand one day, all another brand the next, so if you had some flexibility in your schedule, you could choose what day to go and select your brand that way. (We just went with the first available, but it was nice to have the option).

The side effects were minimal enough to ignore - slight soreness in my arm and I was a bit droopy the next day, and that was about it.
 
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A.P.M.

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Team Pfizer here, first shot was just a headache, second shot gave me fever/chills for about 12 hours afterward, but no big deal.

Funny story: A friend of mine got the J and J shot, and apparently was wiped out on the couch with fever/fatigue. His 50 pound pandemic puppy decided to try and play, jumped on the couch, and flipped it, dumping him and the dog on the floor.
 
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Introversion

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I'm a survivor. Had it in early October and was fortunate that the only real issue I was a very low blood sugar episode (in the 20s).
Yikes! 😱 Lowest I’ve ever read was 35, and brane thing no werk so guud no moar at those low levels!

Glad you survived that & COVID.
 
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Friendly Frog

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I voted for 'trying to get an appointment' but Belgium's almost entirely invitation only (apart from a few places) so I have to wait until they reach my age category as they're working their way down the ages.

They're vacinating below 64 since May but since they they've also put an age limit of 41 (guess what, I just became 40) on both Astra Zeneca and J&J, which leaves only Pfizer for the biggest part of the unvaccinated, like me. Queue delays that they don't want to admit to. So they quietly took the old website with earlier projections and calendars down so you have now absolutely NO idea if and when your vaccination invitation is going to arrive.

I admit it leaves me fretting A LOT. And the condescension that my generation is too stupid to decide for themselves whether the small risk of vaccine-induced trombosis is worth it grates like HELL. I'm grumpy practically all the time. And it doesn't help that I keep hearing from all sides all these messages of 'get vaccinated!' and seemingly every body else has at least one shot and I can't seem to get one.

I have been grudge gardening a lot this month just to deal with the frustration.
 

Liz_V

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Both shots, Pfizer. Had a pretty sore arm later in the day, worse after the first one than the second; took some acetaminophen before bed and it was down to just a little tender the next day. (Tip for those who haven't gotten jabbed yet: Flexing your arm every 20 minutes or so helps the soreness go away.) After the second, I felt a bit tired for a couple days, but nothing an extra cup of coffee couldn't cure. No other side effects.

Housemate got Moderna (through her work). Mildly sore arm; after the second shot, she felt kind of icky for a couple days, like you do when you're thinking about coming down with something. But again, nothing she couldn't work through.

My 82-year-old mother got Pfizer, and a sore arm for a day. No other side effects at all.

It's interesting (in a "jeez, this world" sort of way) to see how differently the process is playing out in different states and countries. Michigan's is a haphazard patchwork of providers and procedures which sounds like an absolute clusterfsck, and yet I lucked out and got appointments for my mom and for myself pretty quickly. :Shrug:
 
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MaeZe

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Could have gotten shots on the first round here as a health care worker but I don't see many patients so I waited until my age group was eligible then went in as soon as I could get an appointment. That was frustrating because appointments filled before you could click on the open date. But finally I got both doses, Pfizer.

My son drove from Seattle to Yakima (142 miles) to get his first dose as it was where a dose was available. There was more vaccine by the time he got his second dose and he was able to get it locally.

I had no side effects at all with either shot. That's the norm for me with other vaccines as well. I don't even get a sore arm after a tetanus shot. But it worries me because I take a moderate dose of immunosuppressants. I tried to get an antibody test afterword but they aren't available yet to check vaccine response. One reason is the meaning of the test result is not well established. So I continue to worry if the vaccine worked but I'm relieved to have had it.

Most people I know felt relieved after getting the vaccine, a shared experience after a year and a half of worry. I still wear my mask in public places for other people's comfort. Why people are more afraid of the vaccine than the disease is beyond me. I taught an infectious disease class at an outpatient surgery center last Monday and there were a few people there, all health care providers, who refused to get vaccinated.

Some information on the vaccines for anyone interested otherwise skip this part:

The Moderna vaccine uses a higher dose than Pfizer's. The mRNA vaccines caused an extremely rare myocarditis in young men, everyone with it recovered without residual problems.

The Johnson and Johnson vaccine caused an extremely rare reaction of unusual blood clotting by the same mechanism as an extremely rare allergic reaction to heparin. Most people who had it were women under 50, but there were a handful of men who had it as well. I still would not hesitate to get the J&J vaccine if it were offered.

Unfortunately the media continues to put profits from selling scandal and controversy over actually informing the public. Every adverse reaction with these vaccines becomes a headline making it appear the vaccines are dangerous when they are not. The number of people who have had adverse reactions is minuscule after millions of doses.

Few people understand the numbers when it comes to reports of effectiveness. A vaccine that is 95% effective means during phase 3 trials, X number of persons were infected with the vaccine compared to Y number of persons who had placebo. It doesn't mean 5% of people vaccinated will still get infected.

An example with fake numbers to illustrate this:

Say you vaccinate 10,000 people with a vaccine and 10,000 people with a placebo. During the trial 5 people in the vaccine group get infected and 95 people in the placebo get infected. The vaccine is then 95% effective. But as to lowering one's risk of infection, only 5 people out of 10,000 doses got infected. The protective effect of the vaccine is well over 99%.

In reality we know the vaccines are working very well but it will take time to collect the data to see just how well. We don't know from the phase 3 trials because we don't know how many people were actually exposed during the study.

Don't be misled by lower numbers of effectiveness with some of the vaccines. Phase 3 trials were done when there was a much higher prevalence of disease in the population studied.

Vaccinated persons who still get infected are having mostly mild or asymptomatic cases and the only fatalities so far in vaccinated persons have been people who had been extremely debilitated before being vaccinated.

Vaccinated persons who do still get infected are not as contagious as unvaccinated persons who get infected.
 
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MaeZe

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I voted for 'trying to get an appointment' but Belgium's almost entirely invitation only (apart from a few places) so I have to wait until they reach my age category as they're working their way down the ages.

They're vacinating below 64 since May but since they they've also put an age limit of 41 (guess what, I just became 40) on both Astra Zeneca and J&J, which leaves only Pfizer for the biggest part of the unvaccinated, like me. Queue delays that they don't want to admit to. So they quietly took the old website with earlier projections and calendars down so you have now absolutely NO idea if and when your vaccination invitation is going to arrive.

I admit it leaves me fretting A LOT. And the condescension that my generation is too stupid to decide for themselves whether the small risk of vaccine-induced trombosis is worth it grates like HELL. I'm grumpy practically all the time. And it doesn't help that I keep hearing from all sides all these messages of 'get vaccinated!' and seemingly every body else has at least one shot and I can't seem to get one.

I have been grudge gardening a lot this month just to deal with the frustration.
I experienced similar emotions before I finally got my first vaccine appointment. Other people in the neighborhood were all talking about having gotten an appointment and I couldn't find one. I finally went online in the middle of the night and found one.
 

Cobalt Jade

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Got in late March/early April, courtesy of my workplace. It was Pfizer. First dose my arm hurt a lot plus both shoulders, and I felt tired and run-down. Second time, oh boy! Was in bed all the next day, and most of the next, aches and pains all over especially in my hands, feet, and back. Same thing happened too my bf -- very debilitated. Still, I'm glad we both got it.
 
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ap123

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I got the J&J, so one and done (for now). Got it as soon as I was eligible, was the third in my home to receive it, all of us are now vaxed. It was such a huge relief for me when the more vulnerable members of my home were vaxed, even knowing immunocompromised people don't seem to get quite as much protection as others.
 
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Roxxsmom

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I've had both, the Moderna. Had a mildly sore arm with the first one, but the second one hit me harder and I woke up achy with that "coming down with something" feeling the next day and just felt very tired. A couple of naproxen and a long nap helped, though, and I felt much better by that evening. Definitely worth it to feel more protected.

My state (CA) was slow with the initial roll out, and my own health care system (Kaiser Permanente) was even slower, as they unaccountably got far fewer doses initially than their proportion of members to the general population warranted. They were still telling us teachers weren't eligible yet when they were, but there was this little community clinic downtown (run by the local Islamic center) that had lots of extra vaccines and were specifically inviting educators to come in. So we got our shots completed relatively early. The shots were free but I sent them a donation.

I agree with those who say entering the world again has been a mental process! It's nice, though. CA ends its mask mandates for vaccinated people in a week, and I honestly hope it's not too soon (since a large percentage of folks are still not fully vaccinated here, though we're doing better than many states).
 
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Lyv

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I chose "both shots" though got the single-dose J&J, but that felt closest to "fully vaccinated." Got it on my front three-season porch as part of my state's homebound vaccination program!

But as a blood cancer survivor, I will still be masking up when coming into contact with others. That's one of the groups who may not be protected. Surprising everyone, I had a strong enough response to the vaccine that I probably have some protection, but so many of my fellow childhood Hodgkin's survivors treated in the 60s, 70s, and 90s haven't generated antibodies that I'm still being careful. I've been afraid that, given my feeble immune system, I'd contact the disease from a viral load too small to infect most people and grow it into a case that could infect someone healthier. There are studies being done and I am hopeful that solutions will be found, but in the meantime, there are millions of people who, for many reasons, aren't protected even after being fully vaccinated and we've been erased by the "fully vaccinated=no need to wear a mask" messaging and the constant think-pieces, even from the left, that vaccinated people who still wear masks are doing so out of fear (which, imo, is as valid as any other reason).

I expect few if any AWers would mock or harass people for wearing masks or otherwise taking precautions they personally don't need to, but if you're inclined, pass the info on since there's not much awareness. I promise, I don't mean to be a downer. I'd planned to stop life-extending measures as soon as my husband was fully vaccinated, but seeing my friends and their kids going out and living my normally is giving me enough joy that I'm sticking around for a little bit. I'm happy for all of you who feel safer and are getting to do the things you missed.

Coronavirus vaccines may not work in some people. It’s because of their underlying conditions.

The state worker is among millions of immunocompromised Americans, about 3 to 4 percent of the U.S. population, for whom the shots may not work fully, or at all, and who are unsure of their place in a country that is increasingly opening up. Emerging research shows that 15 to 80 percent of those with certain conditions, such as specific blood cancers or who have had organ transplants, are generating few antibodies.

Federal health officials’ decision last week to rescind almost all masking and distancing recommendations for those who are fully vaccinated only added to the sense of fear, isolation and confusion for those with immune issues. On Twitter and other social media platforms, many such patients expressed frustration that the change might leave them with less — not more — freedom as their risk of infection grows as more of their neighbors and co-workers ditch their masks.
 

BenPanced

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Yeah, I didn't complain what I'd gotten or how many times I needed to go to the clinic. When my clinic said I was eligible, I practically broke my finger clicking on "Make An Appointment" (two rounds, and the second hit me like a freight train). We no longer need to wear masks at The Day Job™ if we're essential staff, but they're still required by many businesses and public transit, so it's just easier for me to continue to make sure I have one with me.
 
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kikazaru

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I'm in Canada (NWOntario) and I was able to get both shots a few weeks earlier than my age group, because a friend who is a nurse for the reserves around here, had some shots left over and they would have gone to waste. I felt like a queue jumper, but it made sense. I got the Moderna and the first one made my arm quite sore and I had a headache for two days. The second one knocked the stuffing right out of me - like I had the flu for a couple of days. Everyone I know has had at least one vaccine and most have had two. Yippee! Life may be returning to normal. Now, if only the stores would open up, I can buy some new sandals.
 
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Alessandra Kelley

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I'm fully vaccinated, as are my husband and two young adult kids. We all got Pfizer.

I had no symptoms with the first jab. With the second I had a little shoulder soreness, and I got a humdinger of a heavy period two days after (I am borderline menopausal and this was way unusual).
 

Snitchcat

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Yep, got Comirnaty the moment it was available. (There were only two types of vaccines available for me: Sinovac, or Comirnaty and the latter was way more limited than the former.)
 

muse

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I have had both shots - Pfizer. Hubs has had both shots, but he had the AstraZeneca one. I had no symptoms, apart from a tender arm. Hubs had a bit of a reaction to the first jab, okay with the second.

Our youngest (24) has a needle phobia so we're 'gently' encouraging him to go for his.
 

ajaye

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Got my first (AZ) jab three weeks ago. I'd put my name down with my medical centre and they called as soon as I was eligible. I got flu aches and chills on the first night but was back to normal in a couple of days. Am booked in to have the second jab in August.
 
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waylander

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First shot early Feb, second shot early April. AZ both times
 
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Maggie Maxwell

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I got my first shot (Moderna) mid March the day my group opened thanks to my husband working in medical IT being able to connect me with his system. He's high risk, so we were desperate to get us both vacced ASAP. Second shot came right before my birthday, and I recovered within a day.

Unfortunately, my husband hasn't fared as well. He's one of the hundreds affected by this:

Most articles are only talking about under 30s, but he's an over 30 who had it affect him (hospitalized two days after his shot), and he hasn't bounced back yet despite his being in February. He's got an MRI next week to check on him. It's...messy. But we'd both still have rather gotten the shot than not.
 

Roxxsmom

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Here in CA, masks are still required in indoor public spaces, businesses etc. until Jun 15. We're over 50% fully vaccinated here, but rates are slowing down now that it's mostly vaccine-resistant folks who are left. While the state as a whole is doing well and case numbers are dropping fast, my own county only just left the so-called "red tier." No idea why we were so far behind other parts of the state. I don't think our vaccination rates are lower. My only thought is that compliance/enforcement of mandates has been slipshod here. I remember seeing people sitting inside restaurants, for instance, when we were still "purple tier," and very few stores ever enforced the 25% and 50% occupancy rules for the purple and red tiers (and this was way before vaccines were available to most folks).

We did just go to dinner that wasn't take out--sat down at a table--for the first time in ages. It felt nice (take out and delivery are always cold when they get home) but strange too. Almost forgot to put masks back on when we left and walked back through the restaurant. Funny how quickly one lapses into old habits.

Anecdotally, I have just one person in my family who has not been vaccinated and won't be. Next Week I am visiting my mom, who is in fragile health, in So Cal for the first time in ages. My brother is having a get together, and I was sort of shocked to discover he invited that cousin who (along with that cousin's spouse) will not ever get the vaccine because "he is a fundamentalist Christian." I know he's not a member of one of the very, very few denominations that actively discourage vaccination, so I think the excuse is BS. The no-vaccine cousin has always been the laziest person in our family, though, and that has always included lazy thinking patterns, even before he went off the deep end. I'm disappointed but not surprised he went this way.

Wish my bro had been more "tough love" with the get together, though, and said, "No vaccine, no invite." I'm not worried for my sake, but my mom and an elderly aunt (not the mother of the no-vaccine cousin, though she is also fundamentalist Christian and has had the vaccine) will be there, and protection isn't 100%.

My brother, who is an oncologist, has had some issues with his staff, as one person in his office did not want to be vaccinated. He says a surprising number of nurses and other health care workers are refusing vaccines still.

I find it rather shocking that a surprising number of health care workers are refusing the vaccines, given their elevated risk of catching it and the risk of spread to their patients (and having seen firsthand how devastating this virus can be). They, at least, should understand that the health risks from this virus are greater than the health risks of being vaccinated. Clearly they are not getting the education they should be in their schools and training programs, and that bums me out :(