Button holes - a right pain in the......

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Orianna2000

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A couple of tips for working with corduroy--first, make sure you wash and dry the fabric at least three times before cutting your pattern. If you don't do this beforehand, your finished garment will shrink. Also, make sure you clean your sewing machine every day during the project, because corduroy produces a lot of lint, which can clog your machine.
 

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A couple of tips for working with corduroy--first, make sure you wash and dry the fabric at least three times before cutting your pattern. If you don't do this beforehand, your finished garment will shrink. Also, make sure you clean your sewing machine every day during the project, because corduroy produces a lot of lint, which can clog your machine.

The worst fabric I ever worked with was when I made my Dad a velour bathrobe for Christmas about 20 years ago. I had to clean out the lint multiple times per day. But he loved it, and was still wearing it up until he died a year ago. It is hanging in the closet of his bedroom at my house.

MM
 

mirandashell

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A couple of tips for working with corduroy--first, make sure you wash and dry the fabric at least three times before cutting your pattern. If you don't do this beforehand, your finished garment will shrink. Also, make sure you clean your sewing machine every day during the project, because corduroy produces a lot of lint, which can clog your machine.

Oh great..... now you tell me..... bugger.
 

mirandashell

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I guess.... it's good for future projects but this coat is almost finished. I just have to HK finish the seams and sew in the lining.

Oh well.....
 

Orianna2000

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Well, if it's a coat, you probably won't be washing it very much, right? If you do wash it, use cold water and let it drip-dry, instead of putting it in the dryer. That should help reduce shrinkage.

I'm really curious, why would you Hong Kong finish the seams AND line it? If it's lined, the seams don't show, so there's no need to spend all that time binding them. If you want to be sure there's no fraying--which corduroy is prone to do--use pinking shears (on straight edges only, never on bias or curved edges) and zigzag along the edges of the seam allowances, or use an overlock stitch (with an overlock presser foot) to finish the edges. Then you can line it, knowing it'll be secure.
 

mirandashell

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That's true! And thanks for the tip on drying.

Sorry if I came across a bit rude. It was just I lost a little enthusiasm when I realised it won't fit after the first wash.

I'm HKing the seams to learn how. I learn best by doing and as all the materials I'm using were donated, it seems a good oppportunity.
 

Orianna2000

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Ah. If you need help, I wrote an article on seam finishing, which details seven different methods, including HK binding. I posted it at my website not long ago.

(And don't worry, you didn't come across as rude.)
 

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I was taught dress making at school. One of the first things you learn is to sew a button hole by hand, using button hole stitch and one of the last things to use the sewing machine for the same thing.

I've done a lot of both and by far prefer the first method, the later needs a lot of practice to get it right.
 

Orianna2000

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Miranda, I thought I'd sent you something else. But if you've got it, that's great! (My memory isn't the greatest.)

Serenity, it takes a lot of practice to do buttonholes by hand, too. My sewing machine will make automatic buttonholes without any fuss. They don't look like something you'd find on a couture garment, but they're easy. I can make a passable hand-bound buttonhole, but nothing I'd want on my outer garments, where people could see them.

I spent all day yesterday (off and on) sewing a tiered doll skirt. Lots of gathering! I finally finished it, and put it on the doll to mark where to place the hooks. Only it wouldn't close at the waist--it was about an inch too small! I was furious, until I realized what had happened. I had the waistband and the placket facing side-by-side on my cutting table and I must've grabbed the facing when I went to sew the waistband. The facing was the same width, but about an inch shorter, so that makes sense. I had to rip the waistband off and replace it, which wasn't difficult, but time-consuming. And frustrating. I hate having to repeat the same things over again. But the skirt's finished and looks marvelous, so all's well that end's well, I suppose.
 

mirandashell

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Instead of button holes, I made a corded fastening in the shape of a fleur-de-lis with a long loop to go over the button. It looks really nice and I can sew it on securely without the threads showing as I can hide them in the cording.

But yeah, redoing something because you sewed the wrong thing to the wrong thing is bloody annoying! LOL!
 

Orianna2000

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I'm always sewing the wrong thing to the wrong thing. One time, I sewed a sleeve to the neckline! Talk about aggravation, geeze. The big mistakes do seem to be getting farther apart, though, so perhaps I'm improving.

Filigree, most of my website is basic stuff, meant for my students. I only have a few of the more advanced techniques on there. But, I highly recommend Couture Sewing Techniques, if you want to learn more about advanced sewing. It's where I learned a lot of the techniques I use in my personal sewing, like using faced hems, avoiding backstitching, etc.
 

Orianna2000

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:ROFL:

Sorry, sorry! But that just caused the maddest mental picture!

It's okay. It was pretty hilarious! Not at the time . . . I was exasperated beyond belief when I realized what I'd done. But looking back, yup, it's funny. :)
 

mirandashell

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I spent most of today trying to line a sleeve with a beautiful silk that frays when you look at it! Gaahh!

In the end I put bias binding around the edges and then turned it inside out and sewed it to the sleeve. Whilst covered in threads. As was the sofa, the carpet, the sewing table......
 

Orianna2000

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Fray Check is your best friend. Dab it along the edge of the fabric and it will seal it, so it won't fray. Just be very careful not to drip or smear it on any other part of the fabric. It will either discolor it, or leave a permanent watermark, like it's wet, even after it dries. They claim rubbing alcohol will remove it, but it's a lie.

Pinking shears are also helpful, but only if you're cutting on the straight grain. If your cutting curves or on the bias, they won't work.
 

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I use 505 spray-glue to baste the quilts I make, and it works well for temporarily sealing fraying edges. It washes out completely, and doesn't gum up the sewing machine needle like a lot of products do.