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Books to Believe In / Thornton Publishing

editing_for_authors
Editing for authors: because every writer needs a good editor.

James D Macdonald

Re: Just curious -

Absolutely. I'm not sorry. As I said, I feel it's my moral duty.

Don't worry. None of the people who saw your site in the last few days would have been your customers anyway. In a few days the furor will be over, the hits to your web page will drop off, and you'll be left in peace to collect $600 fees from more clueless authors who think that you're a publisher.

Don't imagine that I don't know anything about you.
 

AngelOnBoard

Re: Just curious -

Wow, a double negative - you must be a famous writer!

I DO think you've tried to specifically damage my reputation. I DO think you've tried very hard to ruin my credibility! I do think you've jaded potential customers against my business.

Do you really think you can speak for the many of website visitors I've had? I don't think they'll give you permission. I don't think you can read their minds. If they'd've come to my site without being prejudiced by this nonsense, I bet I'd've had a really good pass through percentage. I do track my visitors and I do keep those stats, so I am able to reasonably predict what revenue that would have brought in.

You can not assume to know what impact you've had - and I've done my best to counter it by constantly repeating that you do not know me or my business or my authors and you've NEVER bought a book from me.

My best customers are those who've met me know me, have done business with me, return and refer and those people return and refer. Those are credentials you can not even come close to challenging or even negating (and I do strongly suggest you stop trying to do damage).

If you think maligning businesses that you've never dealt with as your moral duty, I think you should redefine your moral duty.
 

Risseybug

Re: Just curious -

I'm sorry EJ, but none, I repeat NONE, of the people on this board that found your site would have been your customers. Why? Because we all know that one shouldn't pay to have one's work published. If it's not good enough to get picked up by a traditional publisher, then it needs work. So we work on it, and then get it published.

I am sure that your business has a certain place in the world of fiction, pay for publishing does. But don't try and pull the wool over the eyes of people who know better.

Personally, I don't want to have to market my own book. That's my publishers job. I'll show up for signings, I'll do readings, of course. But for me to have to actually market my own book... no thanks. They send out press releases.
Me, I want to sit back, write my next book and answer my fan mail.

You're not a predator - at least you're honest about the services you provide. But many people who are new to the world of publishing get this idea that paying to publish is the fast track to greatness. And it's not, especially if books are not edited by a professional.
I think that we're just trying to make sure that people know what they're getting into before they do.

I have a friend, she's a virtual friend. She paid to have her work published, I forget by who. I met her after she had set everything up. Anyway, she became very upset when she got her statement and she had only sold 16 books. The thing about it is, that her book was pretty good. It needed editing, but it had a good story to it. She should have stuck it out and tried to find a publisher - one that would have helped her out.

Ok, nuff rambling. I guess what I mean is that you put your business out to be the next big thing in publishing, when, sorry to say, I don't think it is.
 

DaveKuzminski

Re: Just curious -

In fact, many writers automatically assume that a publisher or agent is a predator if they're not listed on P&E. That's the impression I've formed based upon hundreds of emails asking why a particular publisher or agency wasn't listed. Those writers were certain that if something wasn't listed in P&E, then it must have been really bad.

If anything, I did you a favor by listing your site with P&E. How big of a favor, I don't know since I don't track hits or visits. I don't because I don't need the statistics because I don't sell advertising.

I must be a really good writer. I managed to use a triple negative. ;)
 

HapiSofi

Re: Just curious -

E. J. Thornton sayde:
Wow, a double negative - you must be a famous writer!
And what did you spend your time doing, when you were supposedly getting through high school?

Since you bring up the subject of grammar, I recommend that you begin by picking up a copy of Strunk & White and reading it several times through. Your grammar, usage, and typing skills would be below par for a file clerk. For a more comprehensive introduction to English grammar, ESL (English as a Second Language) textbooks are surprisingly effective.

That said, let me explain the double negative.

1. Even if one believes that the double negative is infallibly an error (which it isn't), Jim's sentence, "Don't imagine that I don't know anything about you," wouldn't qualify as such. A real double negative would be something like, "I never said no such thing." As the theory would have it, the intended meaning is clearly negative, but the two negatives cancel each other out to produce a positive.

2. That theory is wrong anyway. The "rule" about two negatives canceling each other out to produce a positive was erroneously imported from mathematics, where it is infallibly correct, into English grammar, where it doesn't belong at all. The fact is, English has always used multiple negatives (as in the example above) as intensifiers. We all understand this on a gut level. "I never said any such thing" and "I said no such thing" are both negative statements, but "I never said no such thing" is emphatically negative.

(There's a famous quadruple-negative sentence in Chaucer that so overemphasizes the emphases that the meaning is reversed ironically; but that's professional-level grammar, not to be attempted at home by the inexperienced or unwary.)

3. Jim's not-inelegant sentence deliberately used two negatives to produce a positive, which English will do if used correctly. If you wanted to transform it into a positive statement, it would come out as something like, "Pray think it possible that I know more about you than you have hitherto imagined."

4. Pray think it possible that some number of us know more about you than you have hitherto imagined.

5. Jim is in fact a well-known author in the science fiction and fantasy field. Since I gather that you still haven't picked up the trick of Googling on the people you're talking to, I'll add that Ann Crispin and Victoria Strauss are also professional SF writers. I'm doubtless missing some others here present.

6. Let me reiterate: Strunk & White. A good ESL textbook. And a good dictionary wouldn't go amiss. Webster's 9th New Collegiate is reliable, and can easily be found used since the more dubious 10th came out.

Why am I telling you this? Aside from your misunderstanding the double negative:
I do think you've jaded potential customers against my business.
My best customers are those who've met me know me, have done business with me, return and refer and those people return and refer.
If you don't share it that is fine, but you've got absolutely no business downing it, because you have absolutely no reference point with me or my business specifically!
I’m not pounding on bookstore’s doors. I teach my authors how to created a demand for the books.
And don't tell me that your language doesn't matter, not in this venue or in any other. You're in the communications business. Language always matters. Besides, I could pull dozens of examples this bad or worse from your own website, where it inarguably matters.

If you're determined to continue acting as a publisher, you really do need to address this problem. Your authors deserve better than to be embarrassed by you.
 

CaoPaux

Re: Just curious -

Your authors deserve better than to be embarrassed by you.
That’s my point, also. EJ, you have yet to address the poor editing and cover design of the books you produce. People are paying you money in good faith, but receiving products comparable to a scam publisher. How do you justify not presenting your authors in the best possible light?
 

RaechelHendersonMoon

Re: This is why I do what I do...

Hi EJ --

<blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Oh and about authors royalty checks - sorry that's classified information, unless of course, you'd be willing to tell me how much you make. But then again, I still wouldn't tell you specifics out of respect for my authors.<hr></blockquote>

That's perfectly understandable. I do not discuss specific titles when giving out sales information either, unless I have permission from my authors.

However, there are ways to give information about sales without discussing individual authors/titles. For an example please look at my <a href="http://www.eggplant-productions.com/journal/archive.asp?Month=7&Year=2004#315" target="_new">Journal Entry</a> in which I discuss number of titles sold in the second quarter of 2004. As an example how many titles for the third quarter of 2004 were sold a) directly from your website to customers (not including authors buying their own books) b) directly from your website to authors c) through any other vendor/distribution channel (i.e. Amazon.com, B&N.com, etc.). A total of all titles for the third quarter rounded to the nearest 1000 should suffice.
 

publishorperish

Damn!

HapiSofi, that was great! Thanks for a very good grammar lesson. Even if EJ doesn't take your advice regarding Strunk & White, I plan to. :D
 

Beth Bernobich

Re: This is why I do what I do...

Oh and about authors royalty checks - sorry that's classified information, unless of course, you'd be willing to tell me how much you make. But then again, I still wouldn't tell you specifics out of respect for my authors.

Is this directed at me?

EJ, I did not ask you how much your author earned in royalties. I asked how much you thought a typical first-time author would get for an advance. You were the one who claimed:

The royalties she has seen has already surpassed what most first and second time authors would get in an advance check

But that's a pretty vague statement, considering the range of advances offered for first novels. If I were trying to decide between self-publishing to traditional publishing, I'd want more details before I plunked down any cash. Naturally you can't give out specifics about income for a particular client, but you could us an idea of what you mean by "lots" and "more than." Did she sell hundred of copies? Thousands? Do you consider $5000 a typical advance or $500?
 

Whachawant

Re: Just curious -

EJ - don't call me Angel, I'm not an Angel, I write about them.

How can you write about something you've never done business with?

(Catch the reference,...?)

As far as the grammar mistake goes, it was just the irony of your dragged out explanations of professionalism,...(like I've said....RELAX) lol
 

Medievalist

Re: Hapi

HapiSofi wrote:

<blockquote>
There are even moments when I find myself thinking that an awful lot of decent but unlovable books get written every year, and why not make their authors happy by running off a few hundred copies? If the book is truly good, someone will notice. It could be that the process would take no longer than submissions do now.
</blockquote>

Well, yes, and why not indeed make the authors happy by running off a few hundred copies. That's what printers do. Not publishers. Publishers perform a variety of other services, like vetting for quality, and editing.

The layout of the Profitable Publishing site is currently much much better, but the English is, well, a disaster. Lots of basic grammar errors, but also crimes against syntax, comma splices, sentence fragments, and prose that reads like it was written by someone who's the textual equivalent of tone deaf.

I know one of the authors, by the way, or rather know someone who knows someone, and so looked at a book. It looks to me like the text had been spell-checked, but not really proofed or edited. I noticed things like confusion with their and there, often a sign of over reliance on a spell check. There were problems with it's and its, a number of grammar and usage errors--things like subject/verb agreement and vague pronouns--and lots of punctuation and syntax problems.

The typesetting was non-existent. Lots and lots of rivers; it looks to me like a straight dump from a word processor file. No real pattern in terms of spacing and punctuation, broken ellipses, and unbalanced quotation marks.

This is not a Good Thing for a publisher. It's pretty bad even if the company in question sees themselves as primarily a printing service, and not a publishing service.
 

HapiSofi

Re: Hapi

Scéla!

Seith Medievalist:
Well, yes, and why not indeed make the authors happy by running off a few hundred copies. That's what printers do. Not publishers. Publishers perform a variety of other services, like vetting for quality, and editing.
Oh, I know. I've long thought that authors who want a few hundred copies would be better off finding to a nice print-and-bind operation. I was just having a momentary crisis of faith.
The layout of the Profitable Publishing site is currently much much better, but the English is, well, a disaster. Lots of basic grammar errors, but also crimes against syntax, comma splices, sentence fragments, and prose that reads like it was written by someone who's the textual equivalent of tone deaf.
Earless. Yes. It's the website of someone who's not on hootchy-kootchy terms with the Muse of Language. That's a problem. Grammar can be learned, though it's easier when you're young; but no one's ever come up with a way to teach tone to the truly earless.
I know one of the authors, by the way, or rather know someone who knows someone, and so looked at a book. It looks to me like the text had been spell-checked, but not really proofed or edited.
That's about as much as PublishAmerica does. The same can be said of most other operations of this sort. Running a spellchecker over a text is fast and easy, and doesn't require that the person doing it have the copyeditorial turn of mind. I know of plenty of subsidy houses that'll provide editing beyond that point if the author pays for it, but none that'll do it for free.
I noticed things like confusion with their and there, often a sign of over reliance on a spell check. There were problems with it's and its, a number of grammar and usage errors--things like subject/verb agreement and vague pronouns--and lots of punctuation and syntax problems.
I spotted those too, along with swapped-out homophones and near-miss terminology.
The typesetting was non-existent. Lots and lots of rivers; it looks to me like a straight dump from a word processor file.
Double spacing between sentences? Em-dashes that aren't? Oversized indents? Word processing programs always have default indentations as broad as your forefinger.
No real pattern in terms of spacing and punctuation, broken ellipses, and unbalanced quotation marks.
If you never leave out milk and cookies for the Typography Fairy, all those things are going to be low-res objects in your eyes.
This is not a Good Thing for a publisher. It's pretty bad even if the company in question sees themselves as primarily a printing service, and not a publishing service.
Yes, entirely yes. People can't reinvent bookmaking in isolation. They can only reinvent as much as they perceive of bookmaking.

I know an immaculate typographer, John D. Berry, who for a while edited U&lc. One night at a party he showed me a book of poetry he'd designed. I opened it at random and literally gasped out loud. It was more perfect than any other book I've ever seen -- so perfect that it hit me on a visceral level before my forebrain had time to register what I was seeing. Another friend standing nearby noticed my reaction, and leaned over to look at the type design. "Oh, yeah," he said politely. "That's really nice."

I once heard the head of a large publishing company casually assert that running heads are an unnecessary archaism, and can be dispensed with. But then, he also believed that if you tried hard enough, you could come up with an economical page design for a 6x9 hardcover that could be shot down for the mass-market edition, rather than having to be reset, and somehow have the shot-down type come out a readable size; so he clearly wasn't in the habit of leaving out milk and cookies for the Typography Fairy.

There are people in the world who naturally spend time fretting over (say) how to handle hyphenated compound adjectives when one element in the compound adjective is itself a hyphenated compound adjective, and the additional modifier applies to the compound adjective but not its component parts. While these people do tend to get involved in private publishing projects, they're always well-defined projects done in a scrupulous and finickal style. They never wind up overseeing production on projects that consist of throwing everyone into print, quickly and cheaply, who has $600 and a manuscript.

In fact, I think I'd argue that the enterprise of throwing everyone into print who has $600 and a manuscript can be spiritually sustained only if the person doing the throwing isn't looking too closely at the manuscripts that are going in, or the books that are coming out.
 

Gala

John D. Berry

Dear HapiSofi,

I knew John way back when I worked in typography in Seattle. I recall meeting him at Elliott Bay Book Company with other typographers. His talent was astounding.

Thanks for a sweet reminder. I shall look him up.

Gala
 

HapiSofi

Re: John D. Berry

How nice to find someone else who knows him! Would that by any chance mean you also knew Loren MacGregor?

John D. won't recognize "HapiSofi." Tell him I imagine he can figure out who I am without a whole lot of trying.
 

Gala

John

I don't recognize that name, but that doesn't mean we didn't meet.

I met John in late 80s or early nineties. In the former I was working at Aldus (now Adobe) and in the later I latched on to the Monotype dev team creating the first TrueType at Microsoft. I recall a sort of typographer users group that met occasionally. John had a gorgeous business card, as you can imagine, and the group had a publication.

I see John has a website. I'll drop him a line and let him know we're talking about him.
 

Whachawant

Re: John D. Berry

Hey Hapisoft,

I think I'll pick up that book too... sounds good.

Looks like you scared 'IT' (EJ, angel, whatever) off the board with the powerfully stated explanations and grammar. You are very good.

Cheers
(p.s. this thread was a little dead for a while so I thought I'd see if I can spark it up by a simple posting) :rollin lol
 

AngelOnBoard

Re: Just curious -

I can write about angels when I haven't done business with them because it is called FICTION! Maybe if you'd visit www.AngelOnBoard.com you'd have figured that out! You might also figure out the gender of the author and the businessperson.

I hope you guys notice the changes to the website lately - I've put notes on the top such that the visitors remember to scroll to the bottom to see the books that have always been advertised on that page. Thank you for pointing out that people bring up that webpage and if they aren't directed where to go, they might miss important points. I've also switched up the www.BooksToBelieveIn.com website such that you see a couple of the most beautiful covers that I have. These were designed by professional graphic artists - if you don't like them, take it up with the author and the artist. I happen to think that they are awesome.

I will not probably return to this forum, it has fizzled. But I will be putting up several new web pages in the next few days to directly refute some of the ridiculous assumptions that have been proliferated on this and other like websites.

Don't forget, I'm an author first, if I wasn't selling books, then my books would also fail. What I want my books to be are flagships for those that come after mine.

Stay tuned to www.ProfitablePublishing.net for the latest and greatest. Then bring it back it here to discuss unless perhaps, you've found something more useful to do.

Oh, and just for fun, since we've talked, one of my guys has gotten the attention of the Maury Povitch show. Stay tuned, I'll tell you when to watch.

I haven't been here for a while because I've had a lot more interesting things to do like - oh, let's see - BLINK and BREATHE - oh yeah and maybe run my business during the Christmas season (where books not publishing services usually sell best, although...)

I probably won't be back, unless you guys really miss the points and I feel the need to set the record straight.

EJ
 

Whachawant

Yeah Right!

O.K. EJ ...apparently you're not intelligent enough to have a sense of humor. ....you should have figured out I'm just waiting to see how well your company does....

I'll just sit on the side lines and laugh while the pro's break down your company like the Berlin Wall....

Oh and I changed the gender ' mistake '...


*Merry ******* Christmas!*
 

Stlight

Re: Yeah Right!

Heaven knows I'm not a retailer, but I'm just wondering how impressed bookstores will be with a 120 day 100% return policy. Of course, I probably read that wrong, no doubt EJ has one policy for the buyers from the site, where 120 days is rather nice and, like the traditional publishers, an unlimited time for returns from bookstores.

Stlight
 

mysteryhost

EJ

Hello Ellen,

Tell Rob that my tooth still hurts LOL. Just kidding.

It seems that you appreciate some of the constructive criticism here as you have taken their input and made changes to your web pages (which looks very nice btw).

But you are arguing with mainstream writers and that does not make sense. Some of the people here would undoubtedly be potential clients but your aggressive defense instead of an intelligent exchange tends to turn them off.

Perhaps you should present a business case for your services instead of an argument. Remember that most here would not use your approach to publishing and defending your stance will never be appropriate because we are already viable marketable authors.
That is the flaw in your defense. Target the others and make all responses flawlessly accurate even if it means saying, “You know, you are right, I may take that advice.” Or “Perhaps this program is not for you.”

You make some sense but your wares may be on the wrong shelf down this aisle.

MH
 

HapiSofi

Re: Just curious -

I can write about angels when I haven't done business with them because it is called FICTION! Maybe if you'd visit www.AngelOnBoard.com you'd have figured that out! You might also figure out the gender of the author and the businessperson.
Don't count on them doing so. Your book is neither good enough nor bad enough to attract that much interest.
I hope you guys notice the changes to the website lately -
For a while there I was following it by reading Making Light. Have you done anything new since ML stopped doing updates on the story? And instead of churning the site, why not do something truly useful and run a basic spellcheck on it? Maybe that way you wouldn't have things like a link labeled "Spiritual Peorty."
I've put notes on the top such that the visitors remember to scroll to the bottom to see the books that have always been advertised on that page. Thank you for pointing out that people bring up that webpage and if they aren't directed where to go, they might miss important points.
I'm sorry, but did you imagine that the unusually large number of visitors to your site have come there to admire it, or to shop for your books? (I know about your site stats because you opted for the economy version of your visitor tracking system. It makes them universally viewable.)
I've also switched up the www.BooksToBelieveIn.com website such that you see a couple of the most beautiful covers that I have.
They may be some of the most beautiful covers you have, but that doesn't mean they're up to snuff.
These were designed by professional graphic artists -
That's the sense of "professional" that just means "they get paid for doing it."
if you don't like them, take it up with the author and the artist. I happen to think that they are awesome.
That's because you're an amateur.

It's possible to be a real publisher while making do with inexpensive art. Just look at O'Reilly, which does a brilliant job with public-domain 19th C. black-and-white illustrations. However, that only works if good design work is being substituted for original commissioned art, and if the resulting covers are judged with a clear and unsentimental eye.

A few of your covers might pass muster at a small academic press. That's as good as they get. The rest look like real book covers about as much as a bunch of wildflowers in a coffee can looks like a professional floral arrangement.

The other reason that answer marks you as an amateur is that publishers always care how the public reacts to their covers. "Take it up with the artist and the author" is the voice of self-publishing speaking.
I will not probably return to this forum, it has fizzled.
PA's been saying the same thing for more than a year now.
But I will be putting up several new web pages in the next few days to directly refute some of the ridiculous assumptions that have been proliferated on this and other like websites.
Do you care about your authors' books, or is this whole publishing thing just a matter of opportunism on your part? People have been trying to tell you essential facts about publishing and how it works, and certain well-known problems of the publishing model you've adopted. All you've been able to hear is that you personally weren't being praised. I'm really starting to wonder whether you feel any responsibility for the success and well-being of your authors and their books,

If you're going to publish other people's work, you have to pay attention to objective external reality. Your response to most of what's been said here has amounted to "You've made your choices and I've made mine," as though that meant anything. It doesn't. It's just a new age-y way of saying "Oh yeah? Well, that's just your opinion." It's a formulation that will serve just as well for disastrous decisions as for good ones.

Please try to understand that this isn't about you. It's about your authors, their books, their readers, the continental printed-matter distribution systems, and other realities of the great wide world.

It must be reckoned one of the infelicities of your position, that even if you mean well and do the very best you can, your authors can't succeed. You've inveigled them into a publishing model that doesn't work. They may think you're being kind to them, as they rejoice in the simple idea of getting into print, but that's because they don't know any better--yet. I say it's unkind to sell them on the idea that they can make significant sales by getting out there and promoting their own books. A very few can, generally because they're selling nonfiction to a well-defined niche audience. No amount of auctorial self-promotion is going to make a success of a badly written and edited first novel, or poetry or short story collection, or personal memoir, or nondescript inspirational work--not when they have no proper sales or distribution, and their cover images and cover copy are awkward or inept.
Don't forget, I'm an author first,
As though I could ever mistake you for anything else.
if I wasn't selling books, then my books would also fail. What I want my books to be are flagships for those that come after mine.
Your own books have already failed. They aren't going to be flagships for anything. Taken purely as a writer, you're neither skillful nor charming. All you have to sell is your content. Unfortunately, you're ten or twelve years too late to catch the wave on the whole angels thing, and there's no shortage of ill-informed books about publishing and promoting one's own book.

When we tell you we've seen setups like yours before, one of the things we're talking about is your personal history of submission, followed by involuntary non-publication, followed by the launching of a hapless publishing company. There's about a zillion involuntarily unpublished authors out there who've done exactly the same thing you have. Usual outcome: Their companies never become both profitable and legitimate, and no one ever wants to buy the founder's book.
Stay tuned to www.ProfitablePublishing.net for the latest and greatest. Then bring it back it here to discuss unless perhaps, you've found something more useful to do.
Speaking of useful, please do consider spellchecking your site.
(snip...)I probably won't be back, unless you guys really miss the points and I feel the need to set the record straight.
Bit, you might want to swear off the schoolyard condescension routine until such time as you're no longer surviving on mercy alone.
 

arainsb123

Re: John D. Berry

I can write about angels when I haven't done business with them because it is called FICTION! Maybe if you'd visit www.AngelOnBoard.com you'd have figured that out!

I'm pretty sure that Whachawant was using that statement to point out to you that just as you can write about angels without having done business with them, the pro writers on this board can see right through you without having done business with you.

Edit: I must also say, though, that Profitable Publishing isn't a scam; it's a bad idea, but not a scam. Should a writer go with them, his/her book will probably sell about 75 copies; my two iUniverse books' sales averaged out to 75 a piece.

I recommend that, if an author is determined to POD, that author find a publisher that will take returns and that doesn't accept everything that's sent in (such as Llumina Press, which can be found www.llumina.com).
 

Whachawant

Yep

Very good %%WORD2%3, I'm glad someone can read me like a book.

Quite frankly, I have nothing against EJ, nor "her" company, but I will be researching and filing the actions of the company for future reference...which is what this thread and board are about. I just felt like lighting the mood......I guess I'm just misunderstood (sob) ...ah well ...life goes on...both for the just...and the crooked.

Cheers....
 

AngelOnBoard

Re: Yep

I'm so happy for you that after 6 days of no responses to your dissertation that a teenager understands you... (Anders Bruce Homepage of a teen author)

It doesn't matter if you 'watch' me or not. I'll do business as usual. It doesn't matter if I succeed or not, you're the type who will always find a way to criticize. When my authors and I make it on to Oprah or Maury or Leno, you won't say, "Gee, look at how well they did!" You'll still say, "I weep for humanity for celebrating authors who self-published."

I don't live to impress you or anyone on this forum.

So, I don't care if you watch. I don't care if you don't. You don't influence my business, except to watch you and collect the evidence I will use in a lawsuit if your unfounded insults and allegations go too far.

EJ
 

Risseybug

Re: Yep

Oh Geez, lighten up.
First of all, yes, Anders is a teenager, but after reading his material and his site, I think he speaks beyond his years. If I hadn't looked at his site, I wouldn't have known his age at all.

And, turning the tables, uh, ok, so a teenager GOT what she was saying and YOU didn't? Hmmmm...

If you make it on Oprah, I'll eat my hat. Scratch that. If you make it to Oprah's book club, I'll eat my hat. Not likely to happen. No offence, just the odds are against you. Heck, if I make it to Oprah I'll eat my hat. More likely, you'll see someone like James, Victoria or Jenn on Oprah before the rest of us.

Finally, please don't threaten us. We're not stupid. Nobody is saying you're a bad person, nobody's accusing you of cheating people (like another publisher). We're just critiquing your business model, b/c as it stands in the world today, POD, self-published books just don't have as good a chance as traditionally published ones. Why? B/C authors, by and large, DO NOT have the necessary contacts to market their book as successfully as traditional publishers.

If you look at it, hey, many small pubs don't have the same contacts that the big guys do. And POD falls in line behind them.
We're only saying that, once again, you're saying that you're the next big thing, that no matter what we say, your authors are going to be on the NYT Best seller list, and sorry, it just ain't gonna happen. Nature of the beast.
 

Elizabeth George's book Write Away