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Cyia

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You shouldn't have to reword things to speak to people of other religions (unless you're blessing food to a deity they don't worship or something, then individual blessings would probably be a better idea.)


One of the cornerstones of Christianity is that people are given a divine free will and freedom of choice.

And as far as discrepancies/ omissions, remember at the time that the King James Bible was translated into English, the very act of doing so was illegal (or at least could get you killed). A group of men in exile worked with textbooks for a dead language to try and make a complete text that the common man could understand. They didn't know how to speak Hebrew or Greek or Aramaic as a conversational language. They had to deal with languages that were devoid of punctuation, and figure out what to break where. They literally didn't have words in English that could encompass some of the original text. There are numerous Names of God in the Bible, but in English, they're all God. (Case in point, a lot of Jewish scholars WONT write out God like I just did, instead they write something like G-d, there's no way to translate that kind of reverence. "I am" is a simple state of being in English, not so in other texts.

Some words got dropped (and later found in newer translations) others got changed "Murder" to "kill", for example, or "Elohim" being sporadically translated as "angel" rather than "God"
 
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semilargeintestine

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Keep in mind that Christians have the NT which draws very sharp distinctions between Old Law (before Christ) and New Law; they stopped circumcising, sacrificing turtle doves, prohibitions against mixed fiber clothing, Kosher practices . . .

Yeah I won't get into that.

 

semilargeintestine

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You shouldn't have to reword things to speak to people of other religions (unless you're blessing food to a deity they don't worship or something, then individual blessings would probably be a better idea.)


One of the cornerstones of Christianity is that people are given a divine free will and freedom of choice.

And as far as discrepancies/ omissions, remember at the time that the King James Bible was translated into English, the very act of doing so was illegal (or at least could get you killed). A group of men in exile worked with textbooks for a dead language to try and make a complete text that the common man could understand. They didn't know how to speak Hebrew or Greek or Aramaic as a conversational language. They had to deal with languages that were devoid of punctuation, and figure out what to break where. They literally didn't have words in English that could encompass some of the original text. There are numerous Names of God in the Bible, but in English, they're all God. (Case in point, all of Jewish scholars WONT write out God like I just did, instead they write something like G-d, there's no way to translate that kind of reverence. "I am" is a simple state of being in English, not so in other texts.

Some words got dropped (and later found in newer translations) others got changed "Murder" to "kill", for example, or "Elohim" being sporadically translated as "angel" rather than "God"

Re the bold: Not entirely true. The reason lots of Jews (not just scholars) write "G-d" instead of "God" is so they do not accidentally use the name of God carelessly. However, it is also a commandment to not erase any of the names of God, and so just as many Jews believe writing "G-d" is erasing part of the name.

There is yet another belief that it only applies to his actual names--that is the Hebrew names for God, as Hebrew was created before the universe and is the Divine language. As such, it doesn't matter what you write in English because "God" is just an English translation. That's the belief I subscribe to, but I still try not to throw it around carelessly.
 

AngelRoseDarke

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Being bron-again virgin I think is more a mentality thing. They are rededicating themselves to respecting their bodies and selves, etc. But ya it isn't really a scripture related thing. I know non christians who rededicate themselves. But honestly.. you can't just can't undo anything lol So the whole wording of it is flawed.

And nope I am pagan not a christian. But I have always loved spirituality and religions. What people believe and why says a lot about who they are and how they associate with the world around them.

I guess my question would be... what do you really thinks seperates us all? The core of most spiritual beliefs is the same. Don't do harm to others, live a good life, etc. It jsut comes down to the details. You don't have to agree with everyone all the time but that doesn't mean one way of thinking is better then another.

I do have a very general question. IF you have friends with different beliefs do you find that you change how you word things in order to speak to them? For example, I have a friend who is christian and I often find myself wording things differently so she can identify with it (oddly I have read the bible more then her, and know more about it.. which is just funny to me lol.)

Okay so my questions aren't religion specific...

I am Pagan as well. No, I don't word things differently for people unless they ask me to explain something.

Thanks to everyone who replied on the virginity question. It makes sense now. I just had never heard it worded that way before. I have heard of re-purification rites though. For some reason I thought this fell under a different category.
 

Cyia

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And, btw, Semi --

FWIW, your questions aren't offensive. They are probably a bit more detailed than this thread is designed for, but they're not offensive.
 

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Don't worry about typos.. I rule the typo world lol

My reference into rewording I should give an example. My friend is a christian and I am not. But I often refer to her christian/God beliefs so that she will be able to understand the spirit of the meaning behind my words. Now she knows I do not believe what she does, and am stronger in my spirituality then she is, but if I talked to her form my point of view and not hers she would only focus on the differences in us then in what I was actually saying.

Past that I in general avoid talking about religion and spirituality because it seems to me that people can not live with people different then they are (no not pointing fingers or anything lol.)

But then again this friend I speak of is very high maintenance person so that might be what sets the situation apart.
 

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Here's how this works: You state your religion and ask a question related to another religion. Someone answers the questions that pertain to their faith and ask another question about any religion.

I am a true atheist and therefore I sometimes have problems understanding devotion. This does not mean that I in any way criticize people who are believers of any kind.

One of the questions that often pop up, both in my mind, and in discussions with friends who are spiritually enlightened (in lack of other wording), is what it feels like to believe.

I sometimes feel absolutely handicapped in spiritual debates, simply beacuse I can not relate emotionally to what obviously are true and profound feelings about something that is way beyond my perception. In an abstract kind of way I sometimes think that I come almost close to comprehending, but then I realize that there is an emotion there that I am excluded from.

So my question is simply; What does it feel like to believe? I ask this question in general, and would be greatly helped if people of various religions and beliefs would reply.
 

Cyia

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It's a hard thing to explain, actually. It's like having a certainty you have no logical reason to have, yet it's there. If you go opposite to it, you feel it - not guilt, like you've done something wrong, but like a pull reminding you that you know better.

There's a particular belief that I have, that I can pair science and faith up on perfectly, but I'd sound crazy if I tried to explain it. Yet, I absolutely know it's right - as much as I know equations work in math or physics works by set laws.

Does that make any sense at all?
 

Sean D. Schaffer

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I am a true atheist and therefore I sometimes have problems understanding devotion. This does not mean that I in any way criticize people who are believers of any kind.

One of the questions that often pop up, both in my mind, and in discussions with friends who are spiritually enlightened (in lack of other wording), is what it feels like to believe.

I sometimes feel absolutely handicapped in spiritual debates, simply beacuse I can not relate emotionally to what obviously are true and profound feelings about something that is way beyond my perception. In an abstract kind of way I sometimes think that I come almost close to comprehending, but then I realize that there is an emotion there that I am excluded from.

So my question is simply; What does it feel like to believe? I ask this question in general, and would be greatly helped if people of various religions and beliefs would reply.

It's a hard thing to explain, actually. ....Snipped.


Not necessarily, Cyia. Perhaps the answer lies in what each person considers "Normal" belief. For Melisande, it would be normal to be atheistic, while for me, it would be normal to believe in a higher power. It doesn't feel any different, I don't think; it's just the way we are as individuals.

In other words, what it's like to believe is similar to what it's like not to believe. It's all a matter of who we are. :)

I hope this helps out a bit.
 

AngelRoseDarke

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I sometimes feel absolutely handicapped in spiritual debates, simply beacuse I can not relate emotionally to what obviously are true and profound feelings about something that is way beyond my perception. In an abstract kind of way I sometimes think that I come almost close to comprehending, but then I realize that there is an emotion there that I am excluded from.

So my question is simply; What does it feel like to believe? I ask this question in general, and would be greatly helped if people of various religions and beliefs would reply.

This is a hard one to explain for me. As you may have noticed, I am Pagan. For me it's a feeling of comfort in believing that there is more to this life than just living, that there is something else out there. Does that make sense? I hope so.

I have some friends who are atheists and they tell me that they take comfort in believing that there is nothing more. We share the same feeling, just not the same ideas.
 

Cyia

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Not necessarily, Cyia. Perhaps the answer lies in what each person considers "Normal" belief. For Melisande, it would be normal to be atheistic, while for me, it would be normal to believe in a higher power. It doesn't feel any different, I don't think; it's just the way we are as individuals.

In other words, what it's like to believe is similar to what it's like not to believe. It's all a matter of who we are. :)

I hope this helps out a bit.

You're being too metaphorical, I meant it's literally hard for me to explain myself. I'm lousy at explanations. It has nothing to do with the state of normalcy... though that is normal for me...
 
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semilargeintestine

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I am a true atheist and therefore I sometimes have problems understanding devotion. This does not mean that I in any way criticize people who are believers of any kind.

One of the questions that often pop up, both in my mind, and in discussions with friends who are spiritually enlightened (in lack of other wording), is what it feels like to believe.

I sometimes feel absolutely handicapped in spiritual debates, simply beacuse I can not relate emotionally to what obviously are true and profound feelings about something that is way beyond my perception. In an abstract kind of way I sometimes think that I come almost close to comprehending, but then I realize that there is an emotion there that I am excluded from.

So my question is simply; What does it feel like to believe? I ask this question in general, and would be greatly helped if people of various religions and beliefs would reply.

I am Jewish (in case you haven't picked up on that :D ). I hear many people from different religions describe the difficulty in explaining what it feels like to believe. No one in my community (my Jewish community) has that problem. I am not saying this to invalidate other religions, but simply to point out that we spend probably a lot more time talking about how it makes us feel. We get used to describing it, and so are more readily able to.

For my part, there are different feelings. I'll first describe the feeling you referenced: when you are talking about religion or just walking around in life. For me, and I dare say for most Jews, it is a feeling of protection. Jews have a special place in God's heart (1. Not BETTER place, just special in that it is reserved for Jews. 2. God does not have a body, so the "heart" is a metaphor so we can understand). We have a special covenant with Him through the Torah. We know that no matter what happens, we will always be guided through by Him. This is evident if you look at our history. So many civilizations, nations, and empires have tried to destroy us:

Ancient Egypt
Philistines
Assyrian Empire
Babylonian Empire
Persian Empire
Greek Empire
Roman Empire
Byzantine Empire
Crusaders
Spanish Empire
Nazi Germany
Soviet Union

And where are they all now? Gone. But the Jews are still around. Our history is the history of the world and mankind. We have all that in our minds all the time, and we know that God watches over us. Does this mean that he doesn't watch over anyone else? No. It just means that God made a deal with the Jews, and we take pride in that deal.

What does this feel like? It feels like confidence. It's just that little thing in the back of my mind that tells me that I am being looked after. Eliyahu (Elijah in English) tells us that God can make mountains crumble, wind blow, and the earth quake, but his words come to us as a mumbling. That little voice telling me not to worry is God.

The other feeling I get is when I witness or experience something directly related to God or my religion. The best examples are the three times I pray each day or when I wrap tefillin each morning; however, this feeling can also come from something as simple as a bird or a sunset (though it is not quite as strong usually). In the Torah, it tells us to wrap tefillin each day around our hand (and arm) and head. When I say the blessing and wrap the leather straps around my left arm, counting seven times around, I get a special feeling. I know that I am doing what God commanded me to do--that I am fulfilling my part of the deal and bringing myself closer to God; however, I also know that I am doing something that millions of Jews do every morning, and that thousands are doing at that exact moment--that I am doing something Jews have done for thousands of years, all the way back to Abraham. Knowing that not only connects me to God, but to my people.

So what does that feel like? It feels like I've been away from home for years and finally returned. It feels like I'm just seeing someone I love for the first time after a long separation. It's a feeling that wells up in my chest letting me know that I could have everything taken from me, but as long as I could perform even a single mitzvah, I'd be okay.

Sorry that's so long, but that's really the only way I know to explain it. Brevity is not my strong point.
 
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