Ask a question

editing_for_authors
Editing for authors: because every writer needs a good editor.

Status
Not open for further replies.

AngelRoseDarke

Kind-hearted stranger
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 28, 2009
Messages
271
Reaction score
31
Location
Crossville, TN
Website
www.angelrosedarke.110mb.com
If I'm not allowed to do this, I apologize. I have done this before on another site, and it had great results.

Here's how this works: You state your religion and ask a question related to another religion. Someone answers the questions that pertain to their faith and ask another question about any religion.

This is strictly Q&A. No one is allowed to bash someone's beliefs or argue about answers. In the past this has worked, and people learned a lot about other faiths. Some even found that they have had things in common that they never knew about!

I'll go first. I'm an eclectic Pagan (following more than one path).

My question is for the Jewish folks. I have a friend who is Jewish. I've avoided inviting her to dinner because I don't know what to serve (I'm ashamed to ask her). I understand that beef is okay, but I've heard that only certain cuts of meat are to be used. What cuts of beef should I purchase, or should I serve something else altogether?
 

Higgins

Banned
Joined
Sep 1, 2006
Messages
4,302
Reaction score
414
If I'm not allowed to do this, I apologize. I have done this before on another site, and it had great results.

Here's how this works: You state your religion and ask a question related to another religion. Someone answers the questions that pertain to their faith and ask another question about any religion.

This is strictly Q&A. No one is allowed to bash someone's beliefs or argue about answers. In the past this has worked, and people learned a lot about other faiths. Some even found that they have had things in common that they never knew about!

I'll go first. I'm an eclectic Pagan (following more than one path).

My question is for the Jewish folks. I have a friend who is Jewish. I've avoided inviting her to dinner because I don't know what to serve (I'm ashamed to ask her). I understand that beef is okay, but I've heard that only certain cuts of meat are to be used. What cuts of beef should I purchase, or should I serve something else altogether?

I'm a bad cook and I'm having an "expert in mind control" over for dinner and accupuncture. I'm not sure what question I should ask.
 

AngelRoseDarke

Kind-hearted stranger
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 28, 2009
Messages
271
Reaction score
31
Location
Crossville, TN
Website
www.angelrosedarke.110mb.com
I'm not sure what question I should ask.

You can ask any question you've ever wanted answered about a religion different from your own. You can ask multiple questions if you like. It can be anything, as long as it's not worded offensively. You can ask about rumors you've heard, for example or stuff you just want to know more about.
 

Medievalist

Moderator
Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
25,450
Reaction score
6,340
My question is for the Jewish folks. I have a friend who is Jewish. I've avoided inviting her to dinner because I don't know what to serve (I'm ashamed to ask her). I understand that beef is okay, but I've heard that only certain cuts of meat are to be used. What cuts of beef should I purchase, or should I serve something else altogether?

Just ask her if she "keeps kosher." Chances are she doesn't. When you invite her, you can say "I was planning on serving X and Y; would that be OK?"You might ask the same question of any guest.

Don't serve ham, pork, bacon, shrimp, or lobster.

Don't mix meat and dairy. No cheeseburgers. No dairy used in preparation of other dishes you serve at the meal.

And honestly, an awful lot of Jews these days don't even avoid pork, but it's better to check your menu; that way, if she's vegetarian, or something, you'll know that too.
 

AngelRoseDarke

Kind-hearted stranger
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 28, 2009
Messages
271
Reaction score
31
Location
Crossville, TN
Website
www.angelrosedarke.110mb.com
Just ask her if she "keeps kosher." Chances are she doesn't. When you invite her, you can say "I was planning on serving X and Y; would that be OK?"You might ask the same question of any guest.

Don't serve ham, pork, bacon, shrimp, or lobster.

Don't mix meat and dairy. No cheeseburgers. No dairy used in preparation of other dishes you serve at the meal.

And honestly, an awful lot of Jews these days don't even avoid pork, but it's better to check your menu; that way, if she's vegetarian, or something, you'll know that too.

Thanks a bunch. I didn't know there were rules about dairy. I had no idea about the seafood either.

I know that she doesn't eat pork, and she has made comments about her household being strict with their practices. I'll ask if she keeps kosher. I'm fairly sure she does. There's a store in town that specializes in kosher foods. Maybe I should see if they have the stuff I'll need to fix the meal.

We've been friends for over a year, and I feel terrible that I've never invited her to dinner. She's never invited us, and I often get the feeling that it's for the same reason. I'm hoping to break the ice. My family doesn't care what we eat, so it won't be a big deal for us.
 

semilargeintestine

BassGirl 5000
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
4,763
Reaction score
1,034
Actually, if she keeps kosher it won't matter what you serve as your kitchen is not kosher. Sorry that sounds kind of derogatory, but it's true. Food cooked in a non-kosher kitchen is automatically not kosher. Your best bet would be to take her out to a kosher place. You could also buy food that is kosher that doesn't need to be cooked and "kosherise" your silverware. It can be done, but it will be difficult to actually have a kosher meal.

ETA: On a side note, if she is okay eating in a non-kosher kitchen but wants to eat only kosher animals, make sure to not get any non-kosher foods or mix meat and dairy (ANY meat, including fowl/poultry). It's pretty easy to find a list. That link also has the other rules regarding Kashrut.
 
Last edited:

AngelRoseDarke

Kind-hearted stranger
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 28, 2009
Messages
271
Reaction score
31
Location
Crossville, TN
Website
www.angelrosedarke.110mb.com
Thanks for the link.

I guess I'm going to have to suck it up and ask her. If my kitchen won't work (I'm not offended, BTW that was useful info) I'll have to invite her out of town to a kosher restaurant. We don't have any local, just a store.

I'm learning all kinds of things! Anybody else want to join in with questions?
 

semilargeintestine

BassGirl 5000
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
4,763
Reaction score
1,034
All my questions about other religions would be viewed as offensive (even though they aren't meant to be) and probably get me banned.
 

Ruv Draba

Banned
Joined
Dec 29, 2007
Messages
5,114
Reaction score
1,319
I'm a bad cook and I'm having an "expert in mind control" over for dinner and accupuncture. I'm not sure what question I should ask.
I'm not a bad cook myself, but some of my best friends are. I really love you guys. I'm not an expert in mind control either, but my wife is, and for the last 25 or so years we've lived together as happily as she has allowed.

If you're going to invite an expert in mind control over for dinner then the main thing you need to know is that they like to be surprised. Pot luck works well if you disconnect your phones a week in advance and use aluminium baking trays (hint: reserve an extra one for your head).

Acupuncture can be a relaxing way to end a dinner-party, unless your expert in mind control is of the vodoun faith, in which case pin-sticking may be viewed as an act of mortal aggression. Be sure to enquire first.

(Releasing: thread hijack. :))
 
Last edited:

Medievalist

Moderator
Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
25,450
Reaction score
6,340
Thanks a bunch. I didn't know there were rules about dairy. I had no idea about the seafood either.

I know that she doesn't eat pork, and she has made comments about her household being strict with their practices.

If she keeps kosher, you're out of luck; your kitchen and such won't meet the basic standards.

Jews who keep kosher are often aware of local places where there are things that they can eat; that might be an alternative.
 

Sean D. Schaffer

Super Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 18, 2006
Messages
4,026
Reaction score
1,433
All my questions about other religions would be viewed as offensive (even though they aren't meant to be) and probably get me banned.


PM a mod about whether or not the questions will be offensive. I'm sure if you don't mean them to be, you could word them in such a way as to "Soften the blow a bit," as it were. :)
 

semilargeintestine

BassGirl 5000
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
4,763
Reaction score
1,034
The problem is, most of my questions have to do with fundamental beliefs that don't make sense to me, mostly in Christianity. I have a feeling at least one person would be offended by me "questioning the validity of his beliefs" or something to that effect.

I am really confused about how the Ten Commandments were changed and why the Sabbath was randomly changed to Sunday. Are those too heavy for the thread?
 

Cyia

Rewriting My Destiny
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 15, 2008
Messages
18,369
Reaction score
3,501
Location
Brillig in the slithy toves...
Semi, if you have any questions like those and are uncomfortable with posting them I can try and answer them by PM. Questions asked in earnest are rarely truly offensive.

As far as the Sabbath, it's not really random - or observed as Sunday by all Christians. There are 2 versions I can give you as to why the day was changed for Christianity.

1. Whereas the day established in Genesis is "the Evening and the Morning", for practical purposes, some started to observe days as "morning and evening" so it's off by a half day.

and the other one:

2. The tithe. Sunday is the standard for the 1st day of the work week. Where God rested on the Sabbath at the end of creation, some take the mentions of tithe to mean that "first fruits of your labors" should include the first hours of the work week.
 

semilargeintestine

BassGirl 5000
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
4,763
Reaction score
1,034
The first explanation would make perfect sense to me if they just did Saturday. The "day" as we know it was created evening, morning, afternoon (Evening and morning, day one). Obviously most calendars see days starting at midnight, so this would push it back half a day like you said. Wouldn't that just make it start Saturday at 12:00am?

The reason it is Friday night-Saturday night is because of how the days are named in Hebrew and the calendar (and both were around earlier than just about every other language or calendar). The days are named:

Yom Rishon - First Day - Saturday night/Sunday
Yom Shnee - Second Day - Sunday night/Monday
etc....
Yom Shabbat - Sabbath Day - Friday night/Saturday

So wouldn't the shift make it Saturday all day and night until midnight?
 

Cyia

Rewriting My Destiny
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 15, 2008
Messages
18,369
Reaction score
3,501
Location
Brillig in the slithy toves...
That goes back to accommodating a work day as opposed to Biblical days (I think). Whereas the Hebrew calendar stayed set as it was, Christianity's changed to accommodate the peoples that it incorporated. Most of them were raised on Roman (or Greek, etc.) ideas of what day was what, and it was difficult to mesh the two. Some things got lost in translation.

Just like the years are different on the Hebrew calendar as opposed to the Gregorian one.
 

semilargeintestine

BassGirl 5000
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
4,763
Reaction score
1,034
Gotcha. That's what I figured. I just don't see how doing it Saturday instead of Sunday would change anything. The weekend is Friday night to Saturday night for us. :)
 

AngelRoseDarke

Kind-hearted stranger
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 28, 2009
Messages
271
Reaction score
31
Location
Crossville, TN
Website
www.angelrosedarke.110mb.com
I have a question for Christians. I have heard of girls becoming "born again virgins" or "second virgins". It has become wildly popular in my area. The concept seems odd to me, as I never heard of it growing up in a Christian home. Does anyone know where this idea came from?

I pass no judgment on this. I'm just curious about the history and reasons behind the practice.
 

Medievalist

Moderator
Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
25,450
Reaction score
6,340
The problem is, most of my questions have to do with fundamental beliefs that don't make sense to me, mostly in Christianity. I have a feeling at least one person would be offended by me "questioning the validity of his beliefs" or something to that effect.

I am really confused about how the Ten Commandments were changed and why the Sabbath was randomly changed to Sunday. Are those too heavy for the thread?

The sabbath was changed to Sunday by early Papal decree as a way of distinguishing the "new" religion (Catholocism, the only Christian church around then) from the "old" one of the Jews. Gregory sort of finalized it, and the Irish had some noticeable difficulty complying.

The ten commandments, that's trickier, because it's a long involved textual argument that's increasingly confusing--and didn't happen universally in terms of the various Christian sects/denominations. If you can find a parallel language Bible, with the Hebrew, it's awfully interesting to look at the key passages in various translations, through history.
 
Last edited:

Medievalist

Moderator
Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
25,450
Reaction score
6,340
I have a question for Christians. I have heard of girls becoming "born again virgins" or "second virgins". It has become wildly popular in my area. The concept seems odd to me, as I never heard of it growing up in a Christian home. Does anyone know where this idea came from?

That is socio-cultural, rather than theological in that it's not tied directly to Scripture. In a way, it's a metaphor around the "rebirth" conferred by baptism.
 

AngelRoseDarke

Kind-hearted stranger
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 28, 2009
Messages
271
Reaction score
31
Location
Crossville, TN
Website
www.angelrosedarke.110mb.com
That is socio-cultural, rather than theological in that it's not tied directly to Scripture. In a way, it's a metaphor around the "rebirth" conferred by baptism.

Thank you very much! I had dragged out my old bibles and couldn't find a reference to it. Now I know why. I understand the metaphor part. That makes sense.
 

Cyia

Rewriting My Destiny
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 15, 2008
Messages
18,369
Reaction score
3,501
Location
Brillig in the slithy toves...
I have a question for Christians. I have heard of girls becoming "born again virgins" or "second virgins". It has become wildly popular in my area. The concept seems odd to me, as I never heard of it growing up in a Christian home. Does anyone know where this idea came from?

I pass no judgment on this. I'm just curious about the history and reasons behind the practice.

It's mainly a purity pledge, and it's not just for girls. re-establishing virginity actually goes back hundreds of years (I'm not Catholic, so I can't help more on that front). The modern version was popularized by "purity rings" and the like and is meant as a way to say "I may have made bad choices, but I promise not to any more" - it can be about promiscuous sex, drugs, or anything the teen in question wants to put behind them. In return, the people in their lives are supposed to also put it behind them for a clean start.

It's also not a strictly Christian concept. There are some areas of Africa with ritual "virginity" restoration. Some of the tribal areas that are notorious for child soldiers and child brides have a problem if these children are recovered, many of them are shunned for the lives they lived. The purification rites (involving being led out of the area by an elder and performing certain tasks before being allowed back in) sort of resets the clock and gives them a chance at a normal life as part of their culture.
 

semilargeintestine

BassGirl 5000
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
4,763
Reaction score
1,034
The sabbath was changed to Sunday by early Papal decree as a way of distinguishing the "new" religion (Catholocism, the only Christian church around then) from the "old" one of the Jews. Gregory sort of finalized it, and the Irish had some noticeable difficulty complying.

The ten commandments, that's trickier, because it's a long involved textual argument that's increasingly confusing--and didn't happen universally in terms of the various Christian sects/denominations. If you can find a parallel language Bible, with the Hebrew, it's awfully interesting to look at the key passages in various translations, through history.

Very interesting. So they disregarded God's commandment simply to distinguish between old and new?

As far as the ten commandments, I have noticed that some sects have them exactly as in the Torah, and others have them drastically different, even leaving some out.
 

Maiden

Super Member
Registered
Joined
Apr 6, 2009
Messages
152
Reaction score
9
Location
Oklahoma
Being bron-again virgin I think is more a mentality thing. They are rededicating themselves to respecting their bodies and selves, etc. But ya it isn't really a scripture related thing. I know non christians who rededicate themselves. But honestly.. you can't just can't undo anything lol So the whole wording of it is flawed.

And nope I am pagan not a christian. But I have always loved spirituality and religions. What people believe and why says a lot about who they are and how they associate with the world around them.

I guess my question would be... what do you really thinks seperates us all? The core of most spiritual beliefs is the same. Don't do harm to others, live a good life, etc. It jsut comes down to the details. You don't have to agree with everyone all the time but that doesn't mean one way of thinking is better then another.

I do have a very general question. IF you have friends with different beliefs do you find that you change how you word things in order to speak to them? For example, I have a friend who is christian and I often find myself wording things differently so she can identify with it (oddly I have read the bible more then her, and know more about it.. which is just funny to me lol.)

Okay so my questions aren't religion specific...
 

semilargeintestine

BassGirl 5000
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
4,763
Reaction score
1,034
I'm assuming you mean when discussing religion. I don't see why it would be necessary to re-word things that had nothing to do with religion. I don't phrase anything differently. Most of my older friends are either atheist or agnostic (and a few Christian-by-birth friends), so they don't really care one way or another. For the people I know who are Christian and practising, I don't rephrase anything. I am a Modern Orthodox Jew, and I believe that the Torah is the word of God given to us. I follow it as closely as possible and believe in it with my heart, my soul, and my might. But, I also realise that the Torah is God's special covenant with the Jewish people, and that not everyone is required to follow it or even believe in it. So I don't treat my religious friends who aren't Jewish like idiots or anything. They are only bound to the Noahide Rules given to (duh) Noah after the flood:

1. Prohibition of Idolatry: You shall not have any idols before God.
2. Prohibition of Murder: You shall not murder.
3. Prohibition of Theft: You shall not steal.
4. Prohibition of Sexual Promiscuity: You shall not commit any of a series of sexual prohibitions, which include adultery, incest, bestiality and male homosexual intercourse (notice no ban on homosexuality or female homosexual intercourse, but that's a different thread entirely).
5. Prohibition of Blasphemy: You shall not blaspheme God's name.
6. Dietary Law: Do not eat flesh taken from an animal while it is still alive.
7. Requirement to have just Laws: You shall set up an effective judiciary to enforce the preceding six laws fairly.

Nothing in there prevents them from believing in whatever they choose really. I take that as a cue from God to let them believe what they want and just try to get along. If someone gets offended by the things I say, it's usually because she's insecure with her own beliefs.
 

Medievalist

Moderator
Kind Benefactor
Super Member
Registered
Joined
Feb 12, 2005
Messages
25,450
Reaction score
6,340
Very interesting. So they disregarded God's commandment simply to distinguish between old and new?

Keep in mind that Christians have the NT which draws very sharp distinctions between Old Law (before Christ) and New Law; they stopped circumcising, sacrificing turtle doves, prohibitions against mixed fiber clothing, Kosher practices . . .

As far as the ten commandments, I have noticed that some sects have them exactly as in the Torah, and others have them drastically different, even leaving some out.

Yeah.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Featured Book