Ancient vs Modern Hebrew.

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reletomp

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When King Darius the Great officiated the Western Arameic language as the language of the empire. it was Hebrew that is the western Arameic. The Eastern Arameic (Caldanians language) died then and continued as a dead written language of the clergy of Zoroastran and other Magi (later Talmud was written by that dead language) a language only rabbies or Hartooms (magi) could read and fathom, not for ordinary people.
Wetern Arameic is Ancient hebrew. spoke western Arameic ie Hebrew the language of Moses exactly, whic is the exact language of Arabic of the Quran.
Ben Yehuda is a Goths of the Ra1a haplogroup of the slavic race. why should he be able to revive a semitic language . This is an absured statement.
 

Smiling Ted

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Ben Yehuda is a Goths of the Ra1a haplogroup of the slavic race. why should he be able to revive a semitic language . This is an absured statement. SNIPPETY-SNIP

:roll:
The Magi spoke an Indo-Iranian dialect; Aramaic is Semitic.
The New Testament was written in Greek, not Aramaic.
Aramaic was a common language of the Middle East with dozens of different dialects. It isn't Arabic. If it were...it would be called Arabic.
Aramaic isn't Biblical or Modern Hebrew. I know, I speak all three.
Aramaic is still a living language, spoken by Chaldean Christians...who emigrate from Arabic-speaking countries because of Moslem-Arab discrimination.
Arabic, Aramaic, and Hebrew are all Semitic languages. Hebrew is not Arabic. Any native Hebrew speaker today can pick up a copy of the Old Testament and read it without difficulty. Our pronunciation has been maintained so closely by the Masora that communities isolated from each other for centuries still pronounce Biblical Hebrew almost identically. But you wouldn't know about that, would you?
And just out of curiosity, when did you get that DNA test on Ben Yehuda?

I could go on, but let's be clear - you don't care about the facts. In fact, you hate the facts, because what you want to do is claim that Jews have no connection to the land of Israel. In order to do that, you have to make up lies to attack that history. And when the overwhelming weight of mainstream scholarship goes against your statements, you'll claim that there is a conspiracy to suppress the truth.

We know that's your purpose - because why else would a "native arabic speaker" show up out of nowhere, with no profile and no previous posts, come to a writer's bulletin board, and go directly to the Jewish forum?

If you want a political discussion, go here.

Otherwise, you're just one more troll.
 
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Shamrockgreen

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Great thread......thank you all posting your knowledge.
 

Sarpedon

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I didn't even notice that this old thread had been resurrected. I'm glad it was, I've learned even more.
 

StephanieFox

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BTW, the presence of adopted words in Modern Hebrew is beside the point: Every living language borrows from others...as anyone who has watched Spanish futbol on a televisíon can attest. (And of course, English speakers are indebted to India for bungalow, hammock, divan...)
;)


And India – at least Hindi – use a lot of English words with, of course, an Indian accent. 'Computer' and 'blackboard' is the same in both languages. And of course, there is 'le weekend' to the horror of pure French speakers.
 

Adelaide

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Yeah, the "weekend" phenomenon happens exactly the same way in Hebrew, too. Lame. Use your own language, people.
 

StephanieFox

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Yeah, the "weekend" phenomenon happens exactly the same way in Hebrew, too. Lame. Use your own language, people.

Jews invented the idea of the weekend (Jewish labor organizers who wanted to attend synagogue on Sat., the way the Christians could on Sunday), but it's American, and Modern Hebrew had no such word. I don't mind that they steal our words. English is a large, flexible and slutty language (it'll welcome any language and make it it's own.)
 

dmytryp

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Jews invented the idea of the weekend (Jewish labor organizers who wanted to attend synagogue on Sat., the way the Christians could on Sunday), but it's American, and Modern Hebrew had no such word. I don't mind that they steal our words. English is a large, flexible and slutty language (it'll welcome any language and make it it's own.)
We actually have a hebrew equivalent for the "weekend" -- סוף שבוע. Incidently, most of the americanisms have their equivalents, though many of them are not exactly used.
For example, somebody upthread mentioned sandwich. It is commonly used, but has a hebrew alternative (karich) which is also used.

ETA: Somebody speaking modern Hebrew can read the Old Testament (though parts of it are written in Arameic), but I wouldn't say it is easy to understand. Many words changed meaning. Many words, nobody knows exactly what they mean, only interpretations. There are a lot of things, like signs for a pause or the likes, are not in use today at all.
 

semilargeintestine

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Yeah, we invented the weekend. We just called it Shabbat. :D (Technically, God invented the weekend, but yeah).

You're right about not completely understanding the Tanakh using only modern Hebrew. The grammar is different as well as some of the words. You could probably get the gist of it, but not the deeper meanings. I learned Biblical first, so I don't really have that problem.

ETA: In fact, I often have the opposite problem and will insert a word or something that isn't really used anymore or the same way. I'll occasionally throw the verb at the beginning of the sentence too. I feel like it's similar to if someone started rambling in Shakespearean English.
 
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dmytryp

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Yeah, we invented the weekend. We just called it Shabbat. :D (Technically, God invented the weekend, but yeah).

You're right about not completely understanding the Tanakh using only modern Hebrew. The grammar is different as well as some of the words. You could probably get the gist of it, but not the deeper meanings. I learned Biblical first, so I don't really have that problem.

ETA: In fact, I often have the opposite problem and will insert a word or something that isn't really used anymore or the same way. I'll occasionally throw the verb at the beginning of the sentence too. I feel like it's similar to if someone started rambling in Shakespearean English.
When I learned Tanach in school (granted this was only a couple of years after I repatriated), I understood maybe two thirds. And there are, of course, heaps of interpretations.
 

mewoone

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Medical terminology is made of latin and greek both dead languages.
If you consider Medical terminology a language then clergy Latin is a similar language.
But not neither Medical terminology and Latin are live languages.
Hebrew also.
As for Aramaeic it must be arabic.
The bible that is written in Arameic (new or old testament) is actually a(EAST Arameic Language) a dead language used only by Magi. it is not the same as the western sarameic language which is identical to arabic and Hebrew (Hebrew being the oldest dialect of the same language, arameic is the middle age dialect of the same language, while Arabic is the last dialect of that language.
That is why people should avoid considering gospels and bible written in the (EASTERN) Arameic language because it was a language exclusive to the magi (example of magi hartoums of Babylonia, and the Talmud).

As a native speaker of Arabic I can read the Bible (hebrew) by replacing the weird alphabet of Hebrew (called Herodian-not original alphabet any way) by Arabic alphabet. However I can not understand a word listening to Radio Israel for example!
Why?
because Ancient Hebrew is Arabic and Modern Hebrew is a compilation of Yiddish Ladino and Talmudic (eastern) Arameic languages with Biblical Hebrew lexicon that is 50% wrong because that lexicon was deciphered by Europpeans speakers of Gothic languages similar to Yiddish ( can not trust them just like you can not trust Yiddish speakers (Ben Yehuda) to decipher the Ancient Hebrew (which is Arabic ie my live first language) I d trust my self before any body like Jerome or Ben Yehuda (both Goths)


interesting information, i read once that both Arabic and Hebrew are originally from the Arabid mother language of Semitic..i see now why i could understand many words.
 
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semilargeintestine

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I don't understand why people keep thinking the Bible was written in Aramaic. It was written in Hebrew.
 

poeticjustice_2001

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Haha, when I first read your post headline, my mind went to the ANCIENT Hebrew alphabet, the one that is in the back of many Hebrew to English dictionaries. It was a much earlier form of Hebrew with more primitive letters. So I was already thinking of a reply involving that very ancient language, with even stranger looking letters!


Hebrew was a dead language, and like Latin, used only in prayer or in certain words in Yiddish. How it was revived is interesting and may answer some of your questions.

http://www.malkadrucker.com/elizer.html

In Hebrew the word sandwich transliterates as sandvitch.


Hebrew was never a dead language.Unlike Latin, there have always been speakers in existence, though admittedly in small numbers. There have always been Jews in Israel, the population just dwindled down to the thousands. They wouldn't have forgotten the language only to have it appear in the 20th century.

Actually, it's not quite that simple. ;)

Biblical and modern Hebrew share quite a lot of vocabulary but the grammar and syntax structures are completely different. When I learned biblical Hebrew, there was a woman in my class who was fluent in modern Hebrew. She could generally make a good guess at the gist of the biblical Hebrew but found it hard to grasp some of the nuances of the grammar. The verb system, for example, is very complex in biblical Hebrew and has been much simplified in the modern system.

Modern and Biblical Hebrew are essentially the same language. When Ben Yehuda revised and updated the language, he was tweaking an already existing language, not inventing an entirely new from scratch. Yes, there were some grammar/syntex adjustments to allow for easier flow and of course the addition of modern words like "car", but too say they are two seperate languages just isn't correct.


I don't understand why people keep thinking the Bible was written in Aramaic. It was written in Hebrew.

Probably because the common fact circulating that Jews in the time of Jesus spoke Aremaic is confusing alot of rather uneducated people. That would be my guess :p
 
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Rufus Coppertop

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Medical terminology is made of latin and greek both dead languages.
Mortuas linguas fundamentum meum!

If you consider Medical terminology a language then clergy Latin is a similar language.
The term is ecclesiastical Latin and a little thought about the definition of terminology should clue you in to the rather simple fact that a collection of terms derived from Latin and Greek nouns and adjectives have only one similarity with a read, written and spoken language, to whit, the nouns and adjectives.

But maybe I'd better elaborate just a bit.

A language is not just a collection of nouns and adjectives.

A language includes nouns and adjectives but does not consist solely of nouns and adjectives.

A language has verbs, adverbs and grammar and syntax. Do you comprehend the difference?

But not neither Medical terminology and Latin are live languages.
Medical terminology is a set of terms derived from Latin and some Classical Greek. Latin is a language and it is not at all dead. There are people who speak Latin. Fluently. There are total immersion courses designed to teach not just the reading and writing but the speaking of Latin.

The fact that Latin is not widely spoken does not mean that it is not spoken.

Hebrew also.
As for Aramaeic it must be arabic.
The bible that is written in Arameic (new or old testament) is actually a(EAST Arameic Language) a dead language used only by Magi. it is not the same as the western sarameic language which is identical to arabic and Hebrew (Hebrew being the oldest dialect of the same language, arameic is the middle age dialect of the same language, while Arabic is the last dialect of that language.
That is why people should avoid considering gospels and bible written in the (EASTERN) Arameic language because it was a language exclusive to the magi (example of magi hartoums of Babylonia, and the Talmud).

As a native speaker of Arabic I can read the Bible (hebrew) by replacing the weird alphabet of Hebrew (called Herodian-not original alphabet any way) by Arabic alphabet. However I can not understand a word listening to Radio Israel for example!
Why?
because Ancient Hebrew is Arabic and Modern Hebrew is a compilation of Yiddish Ladino and Talmudic (eastern) Arameic languages with Biblical Hebrew lexicon that is 50% wrong because that lexicon was deciphered by Europpeans speakers of Gothic languages similar to Yiddish ( can not trust them just like you can not trust Yiddish speakers (Ben Yehuda) to decipher the Ancient Hebrew (which is Arabic ie my live first language) I d trust my self before any body like Jerome or Ben Yehuda (both Goths)
Oh please! :ban
 

Rufus Coppertop

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nobody can speak Latin.

Indica mihi. Si quidam vir potest scribere sponte sententias in linguam romanarum, quid possit eum prohibere eam dicentem?

The Latin language died 1500 years ago.
Really? Gosh. Maybe you'd better tell the Vatican, and the Jesuits just for starters.

the Latin spoken by liturgy in catholic churches is a written language Latin survived only as a written language.
Ah no. Sorry. Wrong. It survives as a spoken and a sung language as well as a written one to this day.
 
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Medievalist

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This is a thread filled with so very many linguistic and philological absurdities that it deserves to sink to the bottom of the bog.

If Richard or Calla Lily wish to resurrect it, they may, but I suspect it would require a propitiatory offering.
 
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