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Algonkian Writer Conferences / WebDelSol

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Editing for authors: because every writer needs a good editor.

HapiSofi

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I just wanted to point out that there is more going on than developing a pitch and blindly using it.
It's still irrelevant to the process of selling one's book.
I found it useful, thats all I'm saying.
You said you got some feedback on your ideas. If so, you were lucky, because that's not what the pitch conferences are about. Their focus is on teaching an irrelevant procedure to writers who don't know it's irrelevant.

There truly are much better ways for you to get feedback. If you're determined to pay for it, the cost of an Algonkian conference would probably get you a full read plus comments and light critiques from a respectable freelance editor.
Also, I realize that there are probably many great beta readers here, but I'm not sure how to find a good or even a great one. Family and friends are only so good.
Family and friends? You're not trying very hard.
Also, from my experience with starting a writing group, many people don't know how to critique or don't understand basic concepts, like show, don't tell, or are not interested in telling you if your idea is to dull.
Come down off that high horse. If you think Michael Neff's critiques are worth paying hundreds of dollars, your own grasp of the fine points of the subject can't be all that advanced. Find some good people and settle down to work with them. You might be surprised at what they can teach you.

(Have to ask: Is there something unusual about the way you react when you're told that your ideas are boring? In my experience, hominids are not slow about letting it be known that they're bored.)
 
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James D. Macdonald

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Francisbruno is, to all appearances, a real person, and is from New Hampshire (so go him!) And I'd expect that various (for example) Clarion grads would show up miffed if some high-profile website had a thread that regarded Clarion as a complete waste of time (if not a borderline scam).
 

francisbruno

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BTW, Francisbruno, if you have something to say to me, say it TO me.

And don't assume you know who/what I'm talking about when I never mentioned any names. YOU may think it's a "thinly veiled argument from authority (logical fallacy)" re Algonkian, but keep in mind that the vast majority of the commercial writing world has no idea what Algonkian is, or who any of its principals are. Keep in mind also that to say I equated them with PublishAmerica is completely false, and a misinterpretation of my point.

Nor did I claim to be any kind of authority. Never once in my post, or anywhere else, have I claimed that.

I have modified my blog post as I was inferring to much as you pointed out. I am also not claiming that you held yourself out as an authority. That is just the name of a logical fallacy and as you are a published author you could be held out as one by one such as myself.

I was just being a bit feisty that night and do not mean to offend, just to point out that I think there is a bit of going overboard on complaining against the conference. I can understand the it's not worth it argument. I disagree in my case, but so be it.

I don't have a dog in this race, I'm off to fry bigger fish as in to decide if hiring a freelance editor for my first book is worthwhile prior to seeking an agent.

Regards,
Francis
 

HapiSofi

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Francisbruno is, to all appearances, a real person, and is from New Hampshire (so go him!) And I'd expect that various (for example) Clarion grads would show up miffed if some high-profile website had a thread that regarded Clarion as a complete waste of time (if not a borderline scam).
True. But the Clarion grads would all show up with slightly different takes on the subject. Then they'd argue with each other. And they wouldn't all proclaim that Daffydd ab Unohoo is God's Gift to Literature.

FrancisBruno could really use a good critique group. That much is clear.
 

Medievalist

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Also, from my experience with starting a writing group, many people don't know how to critique or don't understand basic concepts, like show, don't tell, or are not interested in telling you if your idea is to dull.

-Francis

You're about an hour from Portsmouth; there are scads of writing groups in Portsmouth, with quite a few of them including a number of professionally published authors. Several SF /F and Horror writers, and a few YA writers live in the Portsmouth/Durham areas, and run a number of crit groups.

There are about twenty writing groups in the Durham area, and another fifteen around Biddeford.

Try meetup.com.

Take a class at UNH; Charles Simic still teaches there, as does Doug Herbert from time to time.

The New Hampshire Writers Project used to be well respected back in the day.

There's the Odyssey Workshop for SF, F and horror.

I've done things for N.H. writers arranged through The Center for the Book.

There's New England's SCBWI for Childrens/YA stuff, and they organize crit groups.
 

Medievalist

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I'm off to fry bigger fish as in to decide if hiring a freelance editor for my first book is worthwhile prior to seeking an agent.

Yeah . . .

It's not. Here's why: the really good ones I'd feel personally comfortable recommending are those who work as editors for publishers you'd recognize, but their services are worth more than most new writers can afford (I'm thinking people like Jo Sherman, or Laura Gilman, among others).

And a less than good editor can totally screw things up--and you're still out money.

Find a local crit group. It's not that hard.
 

francisbruno

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It's still irrelevant to the process of selling one's book.
You said you got some feedback on your ideas. If so, you were lucky, because that's not what the pitch conferences are about. Their focus is on teaching an irrelevant procedure to writers who don't know it's irrelevant.
The pitches are run against editors and the editors give feedback. I am not referring to Michael Neff's feedback.

There truly are much better ways for you to get feedback. If you're determined to pay for it, the cost of an Algonkian conference would probably get you a full read plus comments and light critiques from a respectable freelance editor.
The point was that I wasn't ready for that yet. I thought I was, but I had a ho-hum story.

Family and friends? You're not trying very hard.
Come down off that high horse. If you think Michael Neff's critiques are worth paying hundreds of dollars, your own grasp of the fine points of the subject can't be all that advanced. Find some good people and settle down to work with them. You might be surprised at what they can teach you.
High horse. From where I am, it sounds like you are lecturing me. I work 2 jobs and have a family with a toddler and a baby on the way. My very pregnant wife makes it difficult for me to find other writers to work with.
I have taken dozens of courses, was in a writers group in Massachusetts and now I have started my own local group because home life makes it impossible to drive to boston weekly. The problem is that most people are at my level or a little above or below. I don't have ready access to editors to tell me what works or doesn't.

BTW, I am looking at a freelance editor now. It wouldn't have helped before. My premise was so far off that I don't think I could ever have sold it. Now with the guidance of the editors I think I have a shot.

(Have to ask: Is there something unusual about the way you react when you're told that your ideas are boring? In my experience, hominids are not slow about letting it be known that they're bored.)

Nothing unusual. Boring was a simplification. In my experience people don't want to shoot you down. You worked on something and put effort into it. They candy coat. They fix things they see, but don't tell you that the real problem is deep in the story. This may be just my experience or the people I hang with.

I think I made my points I wanted to make and I am not looking to drag this out. I have no stake in this. I just posted my opinions and where I thought the people who were posting con points of view were missing the mark.

If you take the conference as teaching you how to pitch, then it may not be worth it. If you look at the whole experience, I think it can be very helpful, especially to someone starting out. Again, this is just my opinion. I am not looking to make enemies.

-Francis
 

Stacia Kane

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I don't mean to make this thread all about your blog; it's basically irrelevant. But


I am also not claiming that you held yourself out as an authority. That is just the name of a logical fallacy and as you are a published author you could be held out as one by one such as myself.

"She is claiming to be an authority because she has published some books (Argument from Authority)."


(I have a screenshot of your original post, btw, to back that up.)


I was just being a bit feisty that night and do not mean to offend, just to point out that I think there is a bit of going overboard on complaining against the conference.

No one is "complaining against" the conference. We're saying it's not worth the money, and questioning how well it actually teaches writers/how much they can actually learn.

I don't have a dog in this race, I'm off to fry bigger fish as in to decide if hiring a freelance editor for my first book is worthwhile prior to seeking an agent.

Regards,
Francis

It's not. If you want to write fiction, you need to learn to self-edit. ETA: After spending that much to attend a conference aimed specifically at helping you learn pitches, and supposedly run by someone with vast experience and knowledge in commercial publishing, I'm seriously surprised that you would even ask. Any conference/workshop/whatever worth its salt should have told you right up front that you do not need to hire a freelance editor before submission. In fact, you should have been told right up front that you should never pay to submit anywhere, and that you never need to pay to hire anyone, editor or agent or whatever else. That's pretty basic industry info, IMO, and one most pros mention right up front, afaik, because the idea that you do need to shell out cash for that stuff is such a common fallacy.

(Of course, I see from Hapi's quote that this conference disagrees with standard professional wisdom/opinion in this area. Hmm.)
 
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francisbruno

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You're about an hour from Portsmouth; there are scads of writing groups in Portsmouth, with quite a few of them including a number of professionally published authors. Several SF /F and Horror writers, and a few YA writers live in the Portsmouth/Durham areas, and run a number of crit groups.

There are about twenty writing groups in the Durham area, and another fifteen around Biddeford.

Try meetup.com.

Take a class at UNH; Charles Simic still teaches there, as does Doug Herbert from time to time.

The New Hampshire Writers Project used to be well respected back in the day.

There's the Odyssey Workshop for SF, F and horror.

I've done things for N.H. writers arranged through The Center for the Book.

There's New England's SCBWI for Childrens/YA stuff, and they organize crit groups.

I belong to Grub Street in Boston and NH Writers project. However, my family life doesn't allow much travel in the immediate future (very pregnant wife).

I did start a local writers group, however, with the snow this season we missed about a month of meetings and are just getting started.

-Francis
 

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I belong to Grub Street in Boston and NH Writers project. However, my family life doesn't allow much travel in the immediate future (very pregnant wife).

I did start a local writers group, however, with the snow this season we missed about a month of meetings and are just getting started.

-Francis

You can do what you need to do here, on this site. Once you've got fifty posts, you can participate in Share Your Work, and there are some incredible critters there. I don't know that you'd find a better group that was open to unpublished /starting writers, frankly.
 

James D. Macdonald

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Finding a writers' group that's simpatico and meets your needs is always tricky.

And much of this is getting far afield from Algonkian/WebDelSol.

Francis, if you want to join me up in the Novels area, and (after you've participated on the board for a while), jumped into the Share Your Work area, I'm sure you'd be welcomed.

I sympathize with being a writer and having a family. I really, really do.
 

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I've seen loads of authors with professional publications note that they attended Clarion, so I know Clarion turns out (or starts with) top notch writers. I know at least two of the ~twenty people I attended Viable Paradise with went on to get publication contracts with a major publisher (Sandra McDonald and Beth Bernobich. And probably John Sullivan?) Those numbers tell me that VP is doing something right, given that in general maybe one out of a thousand writers manage to sell to a major publisher.

Can anyone tell me what proportion of Algonkian attendees have gone on to sell a book to a major publisher?
 

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Just one teensy-weensy footnote to add to the statement that I otherwise agree with, namely that editors don't take oral pitches from writers. There is one legitimate exception: editors do take oral pitches from writers at a number of RWA (national and local chapters) conferences.

Those RWA conferences also frequently have workshops (a single hour, included within the basic conference price, so, essentially, free) on how to do those oral pitches.

And, really, as far as I can tell, for most of the editors listening to those pitches, they will request a partial (first fifty pages) from anyone who pitches a story that's even remotely within their guidelines for word count and genre, and they will make suggestions if they think there might be plot holes or other issues. Which means that there's really not a whole lot of advantage for developing that pitch beyond knowing what the editor's publisher's guidelines are.

Just didn't want people thinking that just because a conference offered appointments to pitch to an editor, it was some sort of red flag.
 

bobdenny13

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Wrong Information

Addressing what HapiSofi Says about Robert Bausch--You are definitely wrong, sir. The DLB award is all over the internet as the Dictionary of Literary Biography Yearbook Award. The award for distinguished volume of short stories was awarded to both me and R.H.W. Dillard in 1995. If you don't believe it, perhaps you could query the publication itself, instead of relying on the internet, which is a source of information that is not allowed in any freshman composition class for real research since it is so completely inaccurate and unreliable. I also won the award in 2002 for my novel, The Gypsy Man. Readers should pay attention to your bitter tone, before judging Michael Neff and the Algonkian Workshops. (They are named, by the way, for the park in which they are offered. Nothing suspicious or nefarious going on there either.) I've helped a lot of people find their voice in those workshops and I don't deal with pitch talks, I deal with the art and craft of writing, as I have been doing for 36 years. (American University, 1986-87; 1994. University of Virginia, 1987. Johns Hopkins University, Summer 1987. University of Maryland Baltimore, 2007. George Mason University, 1981-86.) I help as much as I can to introduce people to this scribbler's life; among the myths I try to help them deal with is the largely false one that editors and publishers in New York know a damn thing about writing. And the bitter attack on writing programs is getting really old. Nobody complains about a good music school or acting studio; nobody objects to the study of art. It's only creative writing that is scurrilously attacked by outsiders and people who couldn't cut it or get into a good writing program; and they are always attacked with the exact scorn and envy apparent in your post. You say you are an editor in New York? I would not be surprised.

And for your information, a lot of very well known writer's workshops--Aspen, Sewanee, etc.--provide a slew of working agents and editors who are there so writers in the workshops can "pitch" their work. Two of the writers I worked with this past summer, Dale Myers and Emily Miller have successfully "pitched" books and gotten representation from agents, and editors who have promised to read and consider their work. What writers--real writers--provide students in workshops and writing programs is an education about the student's own work; where it is very fine and where it is derelict. Plenty of people work very hard to do just that. And they are not in it for the money. I wonder how many editors promise to get a fledgling writer's work "ready" for publication for a couple thousand dollars or more? I wonder if it would be fair to condemn all editors because of those few who do that? Some of our GREATEST writers attended writing workshops: Tennessee Williams, Flannery O'connor, Alan Gurganis, Jane Smiley, my twin brother Richard Bausch, John Irving, Henry Taylor, Lee Smith, Jill McCorkle, Madison Bell, Richard Wiley, and on and on. It's quite a long list of the most distinguished writers of the late 20th century and of the early 21st. I don't know if you edit fiction, or what you edit, but you should know better. I am not surprised that you don't.
 
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francisbruno

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Finding a writers' group that's simpatico and meets your needs is always tricky.

And much of this is getting far afield from Algonkian/WebDelSol.

Francis, if you want to join me up in the Novels area, and (after you've participated on the board for a while), jumped into the Share Your Work area, I'm sure you'd be welcomed.

I sympathize with being a writer and having a family. I really, really do.

I'll look you up when my post count gets there.
-Francis
 

Medievalist

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And the bitter attack on writing programs is getting really old. Nobody complains about a good music school or acting studio; nobody objects to the study of art. It's only creative writing that is scurrilously attacked by outsiders and people who couldn't cut it or get into a good writing program; and they are always attacked with the exact scorn and envy apparent in your post. You say you are an editor in New York? I would not be surprised.

Sir

You are entirely barking up the wrong tree.

Really, you are.

I don't know if you edit fiction, or what you edit, but you should know better. I am not surprised that you don't.

Yeah . . . you know, you might want to sit down and read a little before you start posting.

HapiSofi is one of the good guys. You two have a great deal in common.
 
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James D. Macdonald

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Nobody complains about a good music school or acting studio; nobody objects to the study of art.

Quite right.

And no one objects to good writers' workshops either, or the study of writing.

The question is whether Algonkian is a good workshop.

Since you're here, could you tell me how many folks attend these WebDelSol/Algonkian workshops per year? Ten? Twenty? A hundred? A thousand?

And could you tell me what the requirements for joining the workshops Tennessee Williams, Flannery O'Connor, Alan Gurganis, Jane Smiley, your twin brother Richard Bausch, John Irving, Henry Taylor, Lee Smith, Jill McCorkle, Madison Bell, Richard Wiley, and on and on attended might have been? Could your typical Algonkian Write and Pitch attendee have gotten in the front door at any of them?

If New York editors are so ignorant, why does Akgonkian spend so much time chasing them? Why advertise their participation so heavily?

Alas, my view of Algonkian was poisoned by the pitchbitch. First impressions, you know. For me, I see a thin layer of sleaze glistening like a slug trail any time I see their name.

Others may draw their own conclusions from this about the utility of "guerrilla marketing."
 
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Stacia Kane

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With all due respect (and I mean that sincerely)...


Readers should pay attention to your bitter tone, before judging Michael Neff and the Algonkian Workshops. (They are named, by the way, for the park in which they are offered. Nothing suspicious or nefarious going on there either.)

I don't think anyone accused or suspected them of something nefarious with the name. It certainly never occurred to me that there was something suspicious; I thought it was an homage. So what, you know? People do homages all the time. There's nothing suspicious about it, and pointing it out isn't an accusation of anything.



...I help as much as I can to introduce people to this scribbler's life; among the myths I try to help them deal with is the largely false one that editors and publishers in New York know a damn thing about writing.

...You say you are an editor in New York? I would not be surprised.

...I don't know if you edit fiction, or what you edit, but you should know better. I am not surprised that you don't.


I'm curious: if you think NY editors are so incompetent, unnecessary, and stupid...why are you working for a conference that focuses on selling books to/making writing sellable to those very people?

What are you teaching those who pay, if you believe NY editors and good writing are antithetical? Are you teaching them what you think is good writing--which by your terms would be unsellable to those oafish NY editors--or bad writing, which is sellable?


(I'm also kind of curious about "this scribbler's life," because aren't you a professor, and not a full-time, supported solely by writing writer?)

(These are genuine questions. I'm not trying to be snide or anything.)


What writers--real writers--provide students in workshops and writing programs is an education about the student's own work; where it is very fine and where it is derelict. Plenty of people work very hard to do just that.


What's the difference between a real writer and a fake one?

Why are editors part of the selling points of the workshops, if they provide absolutely no feedback at all? Francisbruno says he got some feedback from the editor he spoke to; are you saying the editor was unqualified to do that, because s/he was not "a real writer?" Or that the feedback which Francisbruno got was worthless because the editor doesn't know a damn thing about writing?

(Also, that's actually the job of an editor.) But yes, plenty of people do work hard to do just that, and no one is disputing it. Nor is anyone disputing that the Algonkian people work hard. The question is one of qualifications; no one is implying that the Algonkian people are sitting around collecting money and eating peanuts with their feet on the desk while ignoring writers' cries for help.



And they are not in it for the money. I wonder how many editors promise to get a fledgling writer's work "ready" for publication for a couple thousand dollars or more? I wonder if it would be fair to condemn all editors because of those few who do that?

1. No one is accusing them of just being in it for the money. We are saying we think it's overpriced. We are asking about the staff etc.'s experience in commercial publishing (and I note that not one defender of the workshops has come forth with any evidence or details of such experience). That's it. No one has even implied that the principals of the group aren't good writers, for that matter.

2. Lots of "editors" promise to do that. I agree, it's sad. There are also lots of "writers" who promise to make a writer's work sellable or suitable for commercial publishing, and promise to help them make connections with professionals in that industry (which are ultimately not really worth much) if the writer pays them a lot of money, too. There are a lot of "agents" who charge submission fees or annual or semi-annual fees; there are a lot of "publishers" which are just vanity presses or printing houses, and charge writers to submit or for cover art or editing or any number of things because they're actually incapable of selling books to the public. We try to teach/help writers to avoid all such people here.

3. How are you not condemning all editors in your comments above? We certainly don't condemn all editors here. Nor do we condemn all writers, agents, or publishers because of the actions of some clueless or unethical ones.



It's only creative writing that is scurrilously attacked by outsiders and people who couldn't cut it or get into a good writing program; and they are always attacked with the exact scorn and envy apparent in your post.

Perhaps you'd like some sugar to add to your grapes?


I don't see any scorn or envy in Hapi's post(s). I do, however, see them quite plainly in yours, and your attacks on NY editors who don't know a damn thing about writing and are clearly unqualified to judge great writing in any way.


But then, I never went to college at all, and I'm only good enough to support my family by selling books to those dumb skill-less NY editors and the apparently equally moronic reading public, so clearly I'm not qualified to comment on that.




Alas, my view of Algonkian was poisoned by the pitchbitch. First impressions, you know. For me, I see a thin layer of sleaze glistening like a slug trail any time I see their name.

Others may draw their own conclusions from this about the utility of "guerrilla marketing."

Yes, unfortunately, the behavior and personal attacks we see against anyone who dares to even question the workshops etc. leaves a very bad taste in my mouth.
 
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Medievalist

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(I'm also kind of curious about "this scribbler's life," because aren't you a professor, and not a full-time, supported solely by writing writer?).

He's an adjunct at a community college; he is not tenured. He's been a visiting professor at a number of campuses, but again, not tenured.

About the only occupation with more labor and less security than that of an adjunct lecturer is that of a writer.

I think this is a good guy, much as I think HapiSofi and the Macdonald are good guys.

I just don't like some of the company he keeps.
 

James D. Macdonald

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Aspen

Q: How many students are chosen for each workshop?
A: We accept a maximum of 12 students for each workshop.


Q: How are applicants chosen for the 5‐day Juried Workshops?
A: Manuscripts are reviewed by a carefully selected committee of jurors who discuss the merits and quality of writing of each submission. Applications are never read by faculty, staff, students, or fellows.


Q: What does the selection committee look for in a manuscript?
A: In a nutshell: good writing. The best advice we can give is to seek the advice of other writers when preparing your manuscript.
Sewanee
Applicants will be selected on the strength and promise of the work submitted and on the committee's judgment that the applicant is likely to benefit from the Conference.

Write and Pitch
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What kind of experience is necessary?

Given the nature of this writer conference as a foundation-building conference, no experience is necessary. We only ask that attendees be serious about their calling and their tasks.
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Do I have to have a complete MS?

No. You can attend with only a concept, or with nothing at all. We feel that the training and interactions at the conference, as well as the pre-event tasks, will have a dramatic impact on your creative process. .
 
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HapiSofi

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The pitches are run against editors --
Whom you still haven't named.
and the editors give feedback. I am not referring to Michael Neff's feedback.
Will you stop and take a long look at your argument? You went to one of these conferences. Somebody said something useful to you. That's great. I'm glad it happened. But it doesn't justify the daft notion that writers should spend all that time and money to get coached in a skill that few if any of them will ever have occasion to use. It certainly doesn't justify Michael Neff's pretensions to being an expert on how to get published.
The point was that I wasn't ready for that yet. I thought I was, but I had a ho-hum story.
Right. Go to this page, read what it says, and follow its directions. Apply the results to your ho-hum story. Trust me, this works. It's not a joke.
High horse. From where I am, it sounds like you are lecturing me.
Well, yes.
I work 2 jobs and have a family with a toddler and a baby on the way.
I congratulate you from the bottom of my heart, and wish you every joy of them.
My very pregnant wife makes it difficult for me to find other writers to work with.
Your family must of course come first. Still, I'll second Medievalist's observation that you're living in an area planted thick with writers and writing programs.
I have taken dozens of courses, was in a writers group in Massachusetts and now I have started my own local group because home life makes it impossible to drive to boston weekly. The problem is that most people are at my level or a little above or below. I don't have ready access to editors to tell me what works or doesn't.
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You don't need a full-scale editor for that. You need readers. Can you make these people laugh, cry, breathe faster during the exciting bits, and buttonhole you to demand the next chapter? If not, there's a lot of work you can do with them.
BTW, I am looking at a freelance editor now. It wouldn't have helped before. My premise was so far off that I don't think I could ever have sold it. Now with the guidance of the editors I think I have a shot.

...In my experience people don't want to shoot you down. You worked on something and put effort into it. They candy coat. They fix things they see, but don't tell you that the real problem is deep in the story.
Ah. You need one of those structural critics who have a knack for plot. You know who's seriously good at that? James D. Macdonald.
I think I made my points I wanted to make and I am not looking to drag this out. I have no stake in this. I just posted my opinions and where I thought the people who were posting con points of view were missing the mark.
I'm not saying that you personally didn't have a good experience there. I'm saying that Algonkian Write & Pitch Conferences are a useless, worthless waste of time and money, and that they have nothing to do with how books get sold.
If you take the conference as teaching you how to pitch, then it may not be worth it.
Learning to pitch is not worth it. Agents pitch. Authors write books.
If you look at the whole experience, I think it can be very helpful, especially to someone starting out. Again, this is just my opinion. I am not looking to make enemies.
You're not my enemy. I wish you well. But the helpful thing that happened to you had nothing to do with pitch conferences in theory or in practice. It's just a good thing that happened to occur there.
 

HapiSofi

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I've seen loads of authors with professional publications note that they attended Clarion, so I know Clarion turns out (or starts with) top notch writers. I know at least two of the ~twenty people I attended Viable Paradise with went on to get publication contracts with a major publisher (Sandra McDonald and Beth Bernobich. And probably John Sullivan?) Those numbers tell me that VP is doing something right, given that in general maybe one out of a thousand writers manage to sell to a major publisher.

Can anyone tell me what proportion of Algonkian attendees have gone on to sell a book to a major publisher?
VP's done better than that. Their list of VP alumni publications is way overdue for an update, but it's still respectable. They've also gotten some major award action -- most recently, Nora Jamison (N. K. Jemisin) made the Nebula short list for Best Novel.

Some unbelievable number of successful writers have gone to Clarion. I can't begin to count that one. I think you'd have to computerize a list of all known Clarion graduates and run it against the ISFDB.
 
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MacAllister

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VP grad Jen Pelland is up for a short story Nebula, too -- and Chris Kastenschmidt, also a VP grad (VP XI, IIRC) is on the Nebula short list for a novellette, as is former VP Instructor, Jim Kelly.

I might be a little biased, because I get to staff Viable Paradise every year - but VP graduates are making one helluva terrific showing on this year's Nebula ballot.
 
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