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ChunkyC
04-01-2005, 09:06 PM
I haven't been able to get over here in a while, but today a friend posted a link to this site on his blog and I immediately thought the folks here would have fun with it. See which author you match up with!

Which Science Fiction Writer are you? (http://paulkienitz.net/skiffy.html)

I ended up compared to Cordwainer Smith. An honour indeed!
(Note -- they give you code you can paste into a post, but it includes a photo of the author that would chew up bandwidth here, so I just posted the name.)

zizban
04-01-2005, 09:19 PM
Isaac Asimov

What an honor! :Hail:

clintl
04-01-2005, 09:20 PM
I'm Ursula K. LeGuin, according to this thing - also quite an honor!

azbikergirl
04-01-2005, 10:01 PM
Arthur C. Clarke, here.

I feel honored!

DaveKuzminski
04-01-2005, 10:08 PM
A few years ago, I took a similar test and was favorably compared to Robert A Heinlein. This test places me as similar to Arthur C. Clarke. Entertaining, but I doubt if it's at all accurate.

clintl
04-01-2005, 10:35 PM
Just for fun, I decided to see who my opposite is by answering every question with the choice most unlike me. And my writing opposite is:

Mickey Spillane

Nateskate
04-01-2005, 10:36 PM
I didn't do the survey, but if taking forever to finish a novel means anything, I'm turning into Tolkien.

HConn
04-01-2005, 10:39 PM
William Gibson!?!

Me no like.

mdin
04-01-2005, 10:42 PM
I'm Frank Herbert! :hat:

MacAllister
04-01-2005, 10:46 PM
Another Isaac Asimov, here. :)



heh. Don't I WISH.

Julie Worth
04-01-2005, 10:54 PM
Oh my god, I'm Hal Clement!
And my opposite is Mickey Spillane...but he's probably the opposite of most SF writers.

ChunkyC
04-01-2005, 11:02 PM
Just for fun, I decided to see who my opposite is by answering every question with the choice most unlike me. And my writing opposite is:

Mickey Spillane
http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/Emoterofl5.gif
I did the same and got Mickey too! http://www.absolutewrite.com/forums/images/smilies/EmoteROFL.gif

clintl
04-01-2005, 11:15 PM
I think Mickey is very close to becoming the anti-SF writer.

jdkiggins
04-01-2005, 11:36 PM
Isaac Asimov. I would have never guessed that because I really don't write Science Fiction.

Pthom
04-02-2005, 01:15 AM
Gregory Benford.

I read that and said to myself, "Who's he?" I better stop by the bookstore on the way home.

Liam Jackson
04-02-2005, 02:18 AM
Robert Heinlein...god, my agent would fall out of his chair, laughing. (My wife did)

Dawno
04-02-2005, 03:58 AM
Philip Jose Farmer

::wanders off to re-read Riverworld saga::

Galoot
04-02-2005, 04:12 AM
Hal Clement

A quiet (hahahaha) and underrated (Oh, certainly) master of "hard science" fiction (We'll see. Right now Niven doesn't open my mail).

If only.

katiemac
04-02-2005, 04:52 AM
Gibson? Never read him. :confused:

azbikergirl
04-02-2005, 05:35 AM
I highly recommend Neuromancer by William Gibson. Nebula winner, I believe (or was it Hugo?). Awesome.

Anatole Ghio
04-02-2005, 06:39 AM
Samuel Delaney.

William Gibson won both the Hugo and Nebula, as well as the (I think) philip k. dick award for Neuromancer.

Mr Underhill
04-02-2005, 06:56 AM
Jack Vance.
_____________________

Ha! My little joke for Friday night. Actually I came out as:

William Gibson.

Oh, and me like! But damn, how did you two get Clement or Farmer? That would be even cooler. If I can figure out some way to get Jack Vance I'm going for it, but the sublime master is probably not on the list.

azbikergirl
04-02-2005, 07:49 AM
William Gibson won both the Hugo and Nebula, as well as the (I think) philip k. dick award for Neuromancer.
You're right. My copy lists all three right on the front cover.

Terra Aeterna
04-02-2005, 08:02 AM
Heh. I got John Brunner (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1857988361/qid=1112414479/sr=8-2/ref=pd_csp_2/104-0210538-2445566?v=glance&s=books&n=507846). I did a different version of this a few months ago and got Heinlein.

HConn
04-02-2005, 08:54 AM
I've read Gibson and think he's great. But his work is nothing like mine.

whitehound
04-02-2005, 02:44 PM
Some guy called Delaney I've not heard off.

Anatole Ghio
04-02-2005, 03:00 PM
I got to see Neil Gaiman interview Samuel Delaney at the San Diego Comic Con a number of years ago. It was one of the few times I had ever seen Neil take his sunglasses off. They went over every book in the course of the hour and a half talk. When they got to Dahlgren, Neil ran to the restroom and let Samuel talk about it on his own... it needed no introduction.

From what I remember, The Einstein Intersection sounded pretty intriguing.

Moondancer
04-02-2005, 05:30 PM
Hal Clement

clintl
04-02-2005, 08:36 PM
From what I remember, The Einstein Intersection sounded pretty intriguing.


The Einstein Intersection is a great book. Probably my favorite Delany novel.

Glen T. Brock
04-03-2005, 12:56 AM
Hello folks,

I took the test and I was very surprised at the results. It showed me to be Phillip Jose Farmer!

I would have been very satisfied to be Phillip K. Dick (but I don't take mind altering drugs. I've met Robert Heinlein so I know better than to think I could fill his boots. I've met Dr. Asimov and I don't want to fill his. I've met Arthur Clarke and he's probably grinning at us right now.

When all is said and done I'd rather be me. After all, I'm one of a kind--so far.

Glen T. Brock

alanna
04-03-2005, 01:47 AM
I am: James Tiptree, Jr. (Alice B. Sheldon)of course, now i'm mentally planning how i will find some of her works, since i've never actually read any of them, although her real name does sound familiar. :)

mdin
04-03-2005, 01:55 AM
Gregory Benford.

I read that and said to myself, "Who's he?" I better stop by the bookstore on the way home.

I've read a couple of his books, but the titles escape me at the moment. He writes seriously hard science fiction.


Am I still the only Frank Herbert? I'm starting to feel a little lonely here.

CACTUSWENDY
04-03-2005, 02:33 AM
:Shrug: ok...who is ...E.E. "Doc" Smith? Space operas?......purple space?....War tales?


You can tell I don't follow this genre. The picture shows a really old 'man'. So...I guess I'm an old man inside...singing about war?....:banana:

ZaZ
04-03-2005, 02:40 AM
Kurt Vonnegut For years, this unique creator of absurd and haunting tales denied that he had anything to do with science fiction.

http://paulkienitz.net/quizpix/skiffy_kurt.jpg

Anaparenna
04-03-2005, 07:58 AM
I don't like who I got. I have the same problem with calendars. Every time I look up my birthday in a calendar, it's always the worst picture. I'm taking my toys and going home. :D

Where's the one for fantasy writers? :)

Oh, and here's info on E.E. "Doc" Smith. (http://www.z9m9z.demon.co.uk/doc.htm)

alaskamatt17
04-04-2005, 01:06 AM
I'm most like Hal Clement, according to this test.

alaskamatt17
04-04-2005, 01:08 AM
I am: James Tiptree, Jr. (Alice B. Sheldon)of course, now i'm mentally planning how i will find some of her works, since i've never actually read any of them, although her real name does sound familiar. :)

You're lucky! James Tiptree Jr. is amazing. Read "The Only Neat Thing to Do," it's the best work of (relatively) short sci-fi I've ever read.

Sarita
04-04-2005, 03:22 AM
Gregory Benford, A master literary stylist who is also a working scientist.

I can see the scientist part, I am studying to be an Archaeologist... And it said:

(The real Greg Benford once took this quiz, and it told him he was Arthur C. Clarke.)

hehe

scullars
04-04-2005, 03:26 AM
Some guy called Delaney I've not heard off.

Must be Samuel Delaney, one of the first Af-Am sci-fi writers to be published and lauded as a pioneer. As a side note, his aunts gained fame from their book, Having Our Say. One was a black woman dentist (one of the first) and the other was an educator; they never married and lived into their 100s. Two books, a play and a movie were based on their lives.

brokenfingers
04-04-2005, 03:28 AM
OK, this is weird. It told me Ayn Rand.

AYN RAND?!?!?!?

scullars
04-04-2005, 03:32 AM
OK, I'm Gregory Benford... what's with this gender confusion?

I really see myself as an Octavia Butler or Tananarive Due type...

Mr Underhill
04-04-2005, 05:15 AM
AYN RAND?!?!?!?Sorry, brokenfingers, I'm afraid you have no future as an SF writer (Have you read the last half of Atlas Shrugged? Ugh.)

But on the plus side, you have a bright future as a conservative noisemaker on FauxNews or MSNBC. ;) Or cult leader.

Liam Jackson
04-04-2005, 05:28 AM
Sorry, brokenfingers, I'm afraid you have no future as an SF writer (Have you read the last half of Atlas Shrugged? Ugh.)

But on the plus side, you have a bright future as a conservative noisemaker on FauxNews or MSNBC. ;) Or cult leader.

Cult leader can be a lucrative gig, provided you don't poison off the membership. ;)

brokenfingers
04-04-2005, 06:05 AM
Sorry, brokenfingers, I'm afraid you have no future as an SF writer (Have you read the last half of Atlas Shrugged? Ugh.)


sigh.....

I'm doomed. Doomed, I tell ya.

Ayn Rand????

If any of my friends ever find out about this....

(brokenfingers shudders...)

HConn
04-04-2005, 08:12 AM
Cult leader can be a lucrative gig, provided you don't poison off the membership. ;)

Not to mention all the sex-with-crazy-people you can stand!

Carrie Ann Eggert
04-04-2005, 10:14 AM
I'm not even sure of what he writes but I got Hal Clement. From what I read of him on the web tonight he was a hard hitter in science fiction and even made it to the Hall of Fame!

Hey! I'm no rocket scientist! I think the most we have in common (when it comes to strength) is world creation.

I'll be looking in the library this week to see if I can find out more about him and see if they have any of his books.

Carrie :)

ChunkyC
04-04-2005, 11:44 PM
Carrie -- look for Mission of Gravity if you want a good introduction to Hal Clement. His stuff certainly is heavy on the science, and some of his later stuff bogs down a bit because of it, but MoG balances the science and the storytelling as well as anything he has ever done.

MadScientistMatt
04-05-2005, 06:50 PM
Gregory Benford
A master literary stylist who is also a working scientist.

I haven't read any of his writings, but my day job is working as an engineer.

spacejock2
04-05-2005, 07:26 PM
I got Philip Josť Farmer


But I AM an SF writer, and I'm me. And I'm now more confused than me.

WriteWay
04-06-2005, 01:04 PM
Seems I'm a Frank Herbert. Now if I could only sell books like him!

Birol
04-06-2005, 06:58 PM
Philip Jose Farmer

triceretops
04-07-2005, 03:20 PM
Another Hal Clement here. Damn it to hell. I write like Poul Anderson, I thought.

whitehound
04-08-2005, 04:24 AM
Mmm - and if I write *like* anybody I would have thought it would be CJ Cherryth - but I still got Delaney whom I don't think I've ever read. Methinks the test is just a bit of harmless fluff!

SeanDSchaffer
04-08-2005, 11:14 AM
Philip Jose Farmer

katiebug57
04-08-2005, 04:20 PM
Philip J. Farmer . . . and I've never read the guy, so don't if that is good or bad!

BTW, new to scifi/fantasy forum. Working through (too slowly) first major edit of a middle grade urban fantasy.

Katiebug

Pthom
04-09-2005, 03:29 AM
... new to scifi/fantasy forum. Working through (too slowly) first major edit of a middle grade urban fantasy.

KatiebugGlad to have you aboard, Katie. Don't worry about the speed of your edit. Attack it too fast and you'll no doubt miss stuff. ;)

Enjoy the forum.

whitehound
04-09-2005, 04:59 AM
If poss. leave things at least several days, and preferably several months, before you edit them. If you try and proof-read something while it is still fresh in your mind, your brain sees what it knows it meant to put, rather than what it really put.

It once took me six months to realize I'd drawn somebody with two left hands...

Ivonia
04-10-2005, 02:40 AM
Hmm, I got Jules Verne. Interesting to say the least.

Ella
04-10-2005, 05:03 AM
Alfred Bester"A pyrotechnic talent who put only a small portion of his energy into writing."

Feeling rather alone and undedicated. I also said "WHO?". Alfred won the first Hugo for SF, but I've never read any of his stuff. Anyone out there familiar with it?

Jamesaritchie
04-10-2005, 07:21 AM
Yeah, I drew Robert A. Heinlein, who also happens to be my favorite SF writer, and definitely the one I'm most like outside of writing.

Jamesaritchie
04-10-2005, 07:22 AM
Mmm - and if I write *like* anybody I would have thought it would be CJ Cherryth - but I still got Delaney whom I don't think I've ever read. Methinks the test is just a bit of harmless fluff!

This really doesn't tell you who you write like, but who you are like personality wise.

HConn
04-10-2005, 08:24 AM
Alfred Bester"A pyrotechnic talent who put only a small portion of his energy into writing."

Feeling rather alone and undedicated. I also said "WHO?". Alfred won the first Hugo for SF, but I've never read any of his stuff. Anyone out there familiar with it?

Ella, go out and buy The Stars My Destination and The Demolished Man.

They're crazy good.

Ella
04-10-2005, 10:37 AM
Thanks, HConn!

Shiny_Penguin
04-11-2005, 06:31 PM
Another Hal Clement

uugeejay
04-15-2005, 01:45 AM
E.E. "Doc" Smith, inventor of the 'space opera'.

Which may explain why every attempt at a short story turns into a trilogy.

--
Will in Central Texas

Samuel Dark
04-15-2005, 05:09 AM
Well, eh...I don't really want to be compared with any writer of the past. I want to be Alleb Straith -- not the next Stephen King, not the next...Tokien...or whoever. I just want to be a writer, who...well..writes, and is different. BUT, I was interested in what it would say. So....I am:

Olaf Stapledon


Who is this guy, though? I never heard of him.

Anatole Ghio
04-16-2005, 03:09 AM
Olaf Stapleton, early scinece fiction writer. Known for a more theoretical approach, he wrote novels of ideas about the sweep and influence of ideas as they played out over time. His two most regarded novels are Star maker and Last and First Man.

His style is very dense and by focusing more on the development of the theme than the development or exposition of character, he will be offputting to many readers. For those looking for sheer vertuoisty of thought, they will find more bang for the buck here then in other writers.

Barb
05-01-2005, 03:48 AM
Hal Clement? Me? Huh?

Dunno where that came from. Before the test, I might have said Frank Herbert, because that is one of my faves. Oh, well...

whitehound
05-01-2005, 04:44 AM
This really doesn't tell you who you write like, but who you are like personality wise.Good point.

Wormo
05-01-2005, 04:05 PM
Arthur C. Clarke, here.

I feel honored!

I'm Clarke also! *gathers all the Clarke's and starts dancing*!

RhiannonKelley
05-03-2005, 02:27 AM
I haven't been able to get over here in a while, but today a friend posted a link to this site on his blog and I immediately thought the folks here would have fun with it. See which author you match up with!

Which Science Fiction Writer are you? (http://paulkienitz.net/skiffy.html)

I ended up compared to Cordwainer Smith. An honour indeed!
(Note -- they give you code you can paste into a post, but it includes a photo of the author that would chew up bandwidth here, so I just posted the name.)

I got Cordwainer Smith also. Before I ask this question, everyone must put away their weapons. Is this a good thing? I have never read him. I was hoping for Marion Zimmer Bradley. Maybe she wasn't on the list.

whitehound
05-03-2005, 02:59 AM
Cordwainer Smith was a surrealist - very good and creepy, although sometimes a bit indigestible in large doses. His work is high art and sometimes a bit mannered. If you like it (and generally speaking I do) then his stuff is very memorable and worms its way into the brain ["I am too much me: oh I am such me, I'll be a witch"], but the style can sometimes get in the way of the content, in a Ulysses kind of a way.

Most of his work centres around genetic engineering: the use of adapted non-human animals as weapons; and of man/other-animal hybrids as servants; the oppression of such engineered servants; and their struggle for human rights, led by the Messianic figure of the E'Telekeli, The Bird Beneath the Ground.

Try the sad elegant novella The Game of Rat and Dragon, which is more accessible than e.g. The Dead Lady of Clown Town or The Ballad of Lost C'Mell.

kappapi99
05-06-2005, 11:18 PM
Philip Jose Farmer

::wanders off to re-read Riverworld saga::

DITTO :)

Liam Jackson
05-07-2005, 08:15 PM
Frederik Pohl
First time I took the test it was Robert Heinlein.

My bio-rhythm's must be outta' whack.

Diana Hignutt
05-08-2005, 03:07 PM
Greetings! I don't get out of the Neverending PA Thread much, but I popped down for a visit and found this intriquing thread.

Me, I'm a Robert Heinlein kinda girl. Yeah, I guess that fits.

Diana Hignutt
Author of Empress of Clouds (Behler), a 2004 ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year Award Finalist for Science Fiction, and a 2005 Spectrum Award nominee.

Shiny_Penguin
05-08-2005, 07:04 PM
I decided to take it again and got William Gibson (instead of Hal Clement) this time. Wonder what I answered differently.

Albedo of Zero
05-12-2005, 01:07 PM
Arthur C Clarke

sunandshadow
05-28-2005, 12:59 AM
Mmm - and if I write *like* anybody I would have thought it would be CJ Cherryth - but I still got Delaney whom I don't think I've ever read. Methinks the test is just a bit of harmless fluff!

Actually Delany and Cherryh aren't that different - they are both intellictual, philosophical, and occasionally surreal. They even show the same sort of progression from the writer's old stuff to new stuff: Cherryh's _Port Eternity_ is the same sort of thing as Delany's _Einstein Intersection_, while Cherryh's _40,000 in Gehenna_ and _Cyteen_ are more like Delany's _Stars In My Pocket Like Grains Of Sand_ and _Triton_.

Very cool that you think you write like Cherryh BTW. :) She's probably my favorite author, although it's hard to choose. (Have you checked out C.S. Friedman? If you like Cherryh you'll like her too.) Me, I write kind of like Cherryh in that I like the philosophical/analytical take on psychological/sociological subject matter, but my writing is more chatty and funny and romantic.

whitehound
05-28-2005, 02:27 AM
I don't like *all* of CJs stuff - I could never get on with 40,000 in Gehenna or The Tree of Swords and Jewels or the Morgaine books or any of the ones about the wizard in the tower. She has at least three styles and I only like one of them.

But I liked The Faded Sun series and Port Eternity and the Rider books and I absolutely adore Rimrunners and the whole 5-book Chanur sequence, which I re-read in its entirety every couple of the years.

Now the Chanur books *are* chatty and witty and romantic (as well as complex and thoughtful and sinister and all the rest of it) - I think, for example, of the running gag about Hallan Meras and the dirty book.

Lyra Jean
06-04-2005, 09:45 PM
I took the quiz and got Robert Heinlein. I read "Stranger in a Strange Land" I lost the book and then when I found it again, bookmark still in place, I lost the thread of the story and couldn't get back into it again.

TMA-1
07-05-2005, 03:31 PM
Arthur C Clarke.

robeiae
07-05-2005, 04:24 PM
That was cool. No surprise at all:

Ayn Rand

Rob :)

DTKelly
07-05-2005, 04:35 PM
Frank Herbert

I Wish.

moblues
07-09-2005, 01:22 AM
Isaac Asimov


Wow. I'd be impressed with myself if I didn't already know better.

Dhewco
07-10-2005, 03:54 AM
I got the "Doc." Smith guy. Oh, well...I guess I should take that in good natured humor. To be like, personality wise, a nearly forgotten old man.


David

DragonHeart
07-15-2005, 07:14 AM
Hal Clement (Harry C. Stubbs)
A quiet and underrated master of "hard science" fiction who, among other things, foresaw integrated circuits back in the 1940s

I don't actually write (or read) science fiction, but I figured I'd take the test anyway. :P

~DragonHeart~