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View Full Version : What's Your Cheap People Experiences?



joyce
03-28-2008, 05:51 PM
A friend and I were talking about cheap people yesterday and I found it so funny how cheap people can be. My father-in-law was the cheapest person I'd ever met. This guy had money, probably because he was so cheap, but always wanted to spend someone elses.

When my husband and I got married, he wanted us to go around to fast food restaraunts and steal ketchup packets so we could use them at the wedding dinner. First of all we weren't having hamburgers and hotdogs and second, give me a break! I told him I would be happy to spring for a bottle of ketchup and might even throw in some mustard and mayo if he liked. Once my husband took him and my mother-in-law out for a Valentines Day dinner. This man tortured the elderly waitress till I thought she was going to cry. Our bill was over $150 and my husband left a nice tip. I couldn't believe when we all left the table I saw him slip the tip in his pocket and leave, never saying a word. At that moment I couldn't do or say a thing, but the next day I went back and gave the waitress her tip with a nice note of apology. Needless to say, the man didn't like me very much....god rest his cheap ass soul! What's your experience with the cheap people of this world?

James81
03-28-2008, 06:32 PM
I don't believe in taking cheapness to those extremes, but I also believe that I worked hard for my dollar and there is almost always a cheap way to get something done to save some money.

In my case, I am probably the cheap one (albeit I leave generous tips and such). I drive around in a little dinky car because it gets 35 miles per gallon. I'm not crazy about the car and it's always got some little, annoying thing coming apart in it (but nothing major at all), but I hang onto it because I like spending my money on more than driving a fancy car.

DWSTXS
03-28-2008, 06:39 PM
My Mom may very well be the cheapest, miserliest person around. Despite being very well off, she gives 'gifts' at Christmas that are just (literally) trash.

One year I received wooden picture frames that were from the 70's that were broken, and had actually been in the trash.

A year earlier, I received an 89 cent bottle of soap. (the sample bottle kind you buy to take on a trip) It was unwrapped, with the price tage sticker still on it.

As a child, I received the same exact two items every year. One was a cardboard, folded dime bank. The kind that have the little slots that you slide a dime in. This came with one dime in it every year.
The second gift I received every year was a book of lifesavers candy. It had about 10 different rolls of lifesavers in it.
She would give my wife a make-up case, with nothing in it. Every year, same thing. She got the make-up cases from the local J C Penny's or wherever, for going in to get a free make-up sample.

Like, I said, she is notoriously cheap and miserly, despite being very well off.

DWSTXS
03-28-2008, 06:40 PM
I don't believe in taking cheapness to those extremes, but I also believe that I worked hard for my dollar and there is almost always a cheap way to get something done to save some money.

In my case, I am probably the cheap one (albeit I leave generous tips and such). I drive around in a little dinky car because it gets 35 miles per gallon. I'm not crazy about the car and it's always got some little, annoying thing coming apart in it (but nothing major at all), but I hang onto it because I like spending my money on more than driving a fancy car.

well, that's just smart, what with gas approaching $3.50 a gallon.

choppersmom
03-28-2008, 07:08 PM
My mom buys lots of vitamins from a catalog. (Lots and LOTS of vitamins. She's flushing my inheritance down the toilet, literally, but that's a whole different rant.) Anyway, the vitamin company sends her free "gifts" for buying so many vitamins. There's the sorry $1.50 watch, the car emergency tool that cuts your seatbelt and breaks the glass in your window, and a couple of other, highly forgetable items. They come gift wrapped, so she gives them to me and Pat for Christmas. She also gave my older son a fishing-rod-video-game-thing one year, when he was little, and then the next year, she rewrapped the same one - the exact same one, that had been in the house for a year - and gave it to him again. She has dug old Lego kits out and rewrapped them for the boys. It's the saddest thing.

Then there's our lawyer, who is a great guy, but doesn't like to leave decent tips. We had breakfast with him in a diner once, and the bill came to about $30. He paid, and Pat left the tip. Pat has always been a very generous tipper, despite "frugal" tendencies of his own. (He hates the word "cheap.") So Pat left about $10, and Glenn's whole face nearly fell right off his head. He wanted Pat to leave like $2. Pat refused. Then another time we were out to dinner with him and his wife, and he tipped like $5 on a $75 bill. Pat snuck back to the table and left more.

joyce
03-28-2008, 07:27 PM
I don't believe in taking cheapness to those extremes, but I also believe that I worked hard for my dollar and there is almost always a cheap way to get something done to save some money.

In my case, I am probably the cheap one (albeit I leave generous tips and such). I drive around in a little dinky car because it gets 35 miles per gallon. I'm not crazy about the car and it's always got some little, annoying thing coming apart in it (but nothing major at all), but I hang onto it because I like spending my money on more than driving a fancy car.

I agree, this is not cheap just smart. I drive a car that's 10 years old and is good condition. It's still in fine shape and is good on gas. At this moment I just don't want to be burdened with a new car payment, so I guess I'll keep driving mine till it falls apart on the road somewhere.

I have a friend who says she knew a guy who wanted to reuse condoms. Something about this just oozes and drips with cheapness.:D

dobiwon
03-28-2008, 07:29 PM
A friend of ours, the wife of a successful (and wealthy) neurosurgeon, bragged about how she bought her kids clothes at the Goodwill Thrift Store and when they outgrew them, she donated them back to Goodwill, and took a tax deduction.

Perks
03-28-2008, 07:29 PM
heh, heh. My stepfather used to flush his toilet once a week, regardless of what had occurred in the bowl, to save water.

He'd 'rescue' out-of-date things from the dumpster of the grocery store where he worked, including a palette of condoms gone past their prime. Ergo, I have a twenty-three year old sister who was the most expensive money-saving gambit of his life.

donroc
03-28-2008, 07:30 PM
A poker game with colleagues when I was teaching. One of the characters, who always sat on his meager winnings, brought a bag of potato chips (everyone brought something and the host provided other goodies and drinks), and at the end of the evening he saw the bag was about a quarter full and took it home.

joyce
03-28-2008, 07:36 PM
heh, heh. My stepfather used to flush his toilet once a week, regardless of what had occurred in the bowl, to save water.


This sick experience reminded me of another father-in-law episode. The inlaws use to drive their RV down from Virginia and park in our driveway and live for a month every year. One morning I get up and smell this horrible smell to find my father-in-law dumping buckets of crap down my toilet from his RV. He was too cheap to waste the gas and dump in a RV park that was 1/2 mile from my house. The smell almost gagged me as it filled my whole house. I told my husband who informed dear dad to dump his shit somewhere else.

Sarpedon
03-28-2008, 07:52 PM
Wow! I've been told that I'm the cheapest person ever (by people who never met my father) but I don't sacrifice hygene to save money! I'm going to tell these stories to the next girl who calls me cheap.

EriRae
03-28-2008, 07:54 PM
My husband sets the thermostat at 55 all winter, the lowest it can go and keep the pipes from freezing. Air conditioning? Sure, our house has it, but even on 100 degree days in July and August, no way can we turn on the air. He needs a new car, but he won't consider it. He keeps piling money into his 92 Honda like the rust spots are going to magically disappear and the odometer/engine will run backwards like Christine.

Salem
03-28-2008, 07:54 PM
The tightwads who come to the M.A.C counter every day and want free make overs!!!!

choppersmom
03-28-2008, 07:58 PM
My husband sets the thermostat at 55 all winter, the lowest it can go and keep the pipes from freezing. Air conditioning? Sure, our house has it, but even on 100 degree days in July and August, no way can we turn on the air. He needs a new car, but he won't consider it. He keeps piling money into his 92 Honda like the rust spots are going to magically disappear and the odometer/engine will run backwards like Christine.

OMG, I cannot believe I forgot about Pat with the thermostat. He actually bought a lockbox to put around it to keep people from turning it up. He would keep it at 55 too if he could, but I put my foot down, so it went up to 60. My mom asked me once if we keep the thermostat at 68 or 70. I said, 70?? 70?!?!?!?!? I might as well take twenties right out of Pt's pants and burn them to keep warm!

ChaosTitan
03-28-2008, 08:05 PM
As a retail manager, I interact with different levels of cheapness on a daily basis. I mean, we are a middle-to-high end retailer (think Crate and Barrel competitor), but you'd be amazed the looks I get (and the comments) about product prices.

Yes, that solid albasia wood dining table with the intricate hand carving on the corners is five hundred dollars. It's wood. It's not MDF. It's hand-carved. If you don't want to spend a lot of money, go to Wal-Mart and buy their fifty dollar laminate table.

Don't want to spend six bucks on a strongly-scented candle with a lead-free wick? I hear the Dollar Tree has some winners.

Please don't get me wrong. I'm a thrifty person. I've bought some wonderful, like-new clothes from thrift stores. Most of the books I buy are second-hand. And yes, it feels strange at times, working in a store that is mostly unaffordable. But walking in my store and complaining about the prices? Target is right across the street.

EriRae
03-28-2008, 08:06 PM
OMG, I cannot believe I forgot about Pat with the thermostat. He actually bought a lockbox to put around it to keep people from turning it up. He would keep it at 55 too if he could, but I put my foot down, so it went up to 60. My mom asked me once if we keep the thermostat at 68 or 70. I said, 70?? 70?!?!?!?!? I might as well take twenties right out of Pt's pants and burn them to keep warm!

LOL @ burning 20's.

I don't touch the dial. We have a space heater for the dog, though. Poor thing curls up in front of it like he'll never be warm again.

We don't invite people over between October and April. If people stop by, they don't remove their winter coats.

writerterri
03-28-2008, 08:12 PM
Joyce

I had a simular experience. My hubby and I were on a date, long ago, at a place called Loves, don't see them anymore, but these people were dining and having fun and eating everything on the menu. There were three couples and at the end of the meal all were going to tip but the host of the party insisted that he leave the tip. They agreed and headed for the loby while the host pretended to fiddle in his wallet looking like he was going to tip but when the last person left the table he folded up his wallet and followed behind them stiffing the waitress.

Rude!

choppersmom
03-28-2008, 08:21 PM
As a retail manager, I interact with different levels of cheapness on a daily basis. I mean, we are a middle-to-high end retailer (think Crate and Barrel competitor), but you'd be amazed the looks I get (and the comments) about product prices.

Yes, that solid albasia wood dining table with the intricate hand carving on the corners is five hundred dollars. It's wood. It's not MDF. It's hand-carved. If you don't want to spend a lot of money, go to Wal-Mart and buy their fifty dollar laminate table.

Don't want to spend six bucks on a strongly-scented candle with a lead-free wick? I hear the Dollar Tree has some winners.

Please don't get me wrong. I'm a thrifty person. I've bought some wonderful, like-new clothes from thrift stores. Most of the books I buy are second-hand. And yes, it feels strange at times, working in a store that is mostly unaffordable. But walking in my store and complaining about the prices? Target is right across the street.

People love to nickel and dime high-end stores. You get what you pay for, dude, pay it or go to a cheap store, like you said. You wouldn't expect to buy a Cadillac for what a Toyota costs, so if you want to pay for a Toyota, go to the Toyota dealer.

Gravity
03-28-2008, 08:23 PM
There's a story about Howard Hughes--probably apocryphal--saying that after doing his business in the toilet, he'd peel the two-ply tissue apart, saving one part for the next time. No wonder that guy never shook hands. I would have thought twice about gripping his mitt, I'll tell you that for free...

joyce
03-28-2008, 08:25 PM
Joyce

I had a simular experience. My hubby and I were on a date, long ago, at a place called Loves, don't see them anymore, but these people were dining and having fun and eating everything on the menu. There were three couples and at the end of the meal all were going to tip but the host of the party insisted that he leave the tip. They agreed and headed for the loby while the host pretended to fiddle in his wallet looking like he was going to tip but when the last person left the table he folded up his wallet and followed behind them stiffing the waitress.

Rude!

Since I know most people working in a dining facility live off their tips, it makes me mad when someone stiffs the waitress or waiter. If you are a crappy server that pays no attention to me or my needs, I might leave you a little tip, but never to someone who has done their best. I figure if you can't afford to leave a tip to someone who has made your evening possible, then just don't go. I've been trying to get my family to leave me tips for years. The only tip I get is "We're hungry can you hurry up the food a little bit.".:D

joyce
03-28-2008, 08:26 PM
There's a story about Howard Hughes--probably apocryphal--saying that after doing his business in the toilet, he'd peel the two-ply tissue apart, saving one part for the next time. No wonder that guy never shook hands. I would have thought twice about gripping his mitt, I'll tell you that for free...

Maybe this is where his germ phobia came from.

mscelina
03-28-2008, 08:26 PM
I'm a bartender.

That should tell you about how often I deal with cheap people. For example, yesterday I had our normal happy hour crowd in. Part of it is a group of 13-15 people, all professionals in their fifties and good friends with my boss. One lady who's in the group absolutely hates my guts. Her husband has to sneak around and FIND a way to tip me behind her back. so anyway, yesterday I actually saw her with my own eyes--removing money from the cumulative tip this group was piling up on the table.

Then she came to the bar and bought a beer with the money that someone else had intended for me. Classic.

reigningcatsndogs
03-28-2008, 08:34 PM
My uncle would recycle birthday cards. Before liquid paper or anything like that, he would use and exacto knife, cut out the names that were on the card, and then resend it -- in the original envelope, also with the same nice, square holes cut it.

writerterri
03-28-2008, 08:37 PM
Since I know most people working in a dining facility live off their tips, it makes me mad when someone stiffs the waitress or waiter. If you are a crappy server that pays no attention to me or my needs, I might leave you a little tip, but never to someone who has done their best. I figure if you can't afford to leave a tip to someone who has made your evening possible, then just don't go. I've been trying to get my family to leave me tips for years. The only tip I get is "We're hungry can you hurry up the food a little bit.".:D

I work for tips. Some people who have hoards of money don't like to part with much of it unless they get something out of it. Then there are people like me who appreciate it when someone serves my family. We are great tippers and we don't have much money at all. When I do have the money I pay it forward. I figure what goes around comes back around, share the wealth is my modo.

I'd love to say I don't get tipped for dinner at my house but I do get tipped. Everyone including my husband thanks me for dinner. It's an everynight occurance even if we eat out. But a cash tip after dinner would be great. And after :e2brows: too. I'm a good server there too. :D

choppersmom
03-28-2008, 08:41 PM
I work for tips. Some people who have hoards of money don't like to part with much of it unless they get something out of it. Then there are people like me who appreciate it when someone serves my family. We are great tippers and we don't have much money at all. When I do have the money I pay it forward. I figure what goes around comes back around, share the wealth is my modo.

I'd love to say I don't get tipped for dinner at my house but I do get tipped. Everyone including my husband thanks me for dinner. It's an everynight occurance even if we eat out. But a cash tip after dinner would be great. And after :e2brows: too. I'm a good server there too. :D

*TMI, TMI!!!*

mscelina
03-28-2008, 08:44 PM
Good Lord, terri, what a thing to say!

joyce
03-28-2008, 08:56 PM
Terri you crack me up. My hubby always says thanks too but generally it's after my tip to hurry things up. :D

writerterri
03-28-2008, 09:00 PM
*TMI, TMI!!!*


~giggle~ I was going to add that but I wanted to give you the opportunity to do so. :D

writerterri
03-28-2008, 09:05 PM
Good Lord, terri, what a thing to say!

:D it's a gift.

I think after 15 years of thinking up new things to keep him sprinting home to me every night deserves a healthy tip under my lamp now and then. Every now and then!

What say you men?

Appalachian Writer
03-28-2008, 09:09 PM
Although I don't know this guy personally, I've heard about him. He takes those little slivers of soap, the ones too small to use, out of the shower and melts and reforms them into bars for reuse. Like Howard Hughes, he unrolls ever roll of toilet tissue his wife buys, separating the plys and re-rolling so that he gets two rolls for ever one. He doesn't allow his wife to cook a fresh meal until all the left-overs have been consumed, and he washes furnace filters and re-uses them over and over again. I'm not sure where I heard about him, maybe TV, maybe a friend, but he sticks in my mind like a used piece of gum.

RLB
03-28-2008, 09:18 PM
I wait tables part time. The people who ask for water, extra sugar and lots of lemons and then proceed to make their own lemonade. (and we actually have lemonade to sell) As soon as I see it, I know my tip is doomed. I understand if you want to save a little by not paying for drinks, but for Pete's sake, order water!

benbradley
03-28-2008, 09:29 PM
I thought I was cheap - well I am, but not to the extent I've read in this thread...

There's being cheap when it borders on abuse - I heard about a mother who would buy her own clothes at Target, but take her kids to the thrift store to buy THEIR clothes.

sheadakota
03-28-2008, 09:48 PM
My dad washes paper plates and cups, not once but as often as he can. He has owned the same pair of shoes for as long as I can remember, when a hole occured in the sole he simply duct taped it- and replaces the duct tape when it wears out.
he never leaves a tip, but that's ok- I can't remember the last time they went out to dinner- he will not allow my mother to but fresh fruits or veggies out of season- somethimes not even in season.

He cuts his own hair and prides himself on taking very short very cold showers, and never uses deoderant because "Its extravagant"

mscelina
03-28-2008, 09:49 PM
:D it's a gift.

I think after 15 years of thinking up new things to keep him sprinting home to me every night deserves a healthy tip under my lamp now and then. Every now and then!

What say you men?

If you wanted to be technical, during :D you're always getting 'tipped.' *snicker* Maybe he's been overtipping you all along.

ChaosTitan
03-28-2008, 09:55 PM
There's being cheap when it borders on abuse - I heard about a mother who would buy her own clothes at Target, but take her kids to the thrift store to buy THEIR clothes.

How exactly is this anywhere near abuse?

Barring weight loss/gain, adults generally stay one size. I can get years of wear out of new clothes. Kids, however, can outgrow clothing within six months of buying it (especially babies and toddlers). There is a resale shop around here that specializes is children's clothing for that very reason. Why spend eight bucks on a pair of pants your six-year old will outgrow in a year, when you can spend a dollar and get eight pairs?

HeronW
03-28-2008, 09:56 PM
Working in a copy place 25 years ago. Copies were 10c each--price is posted. This old fart comes in for 3 copies and complains that it's cheaper--7c in a city 25 miles away. Can I give a discount. I retorted that a: I'm not the owner, these are our prices & I don't have the authority to change them and b: he's welcome to spend the money for gas to drive a hour into the city to pay less. All this bitching from him for 9 f*cking cents! ARGH!

I will tip the going rate, more if the service is good. I was brought up to say thanks and please, the wait person lives off of tips and makes a living at a job I'd go crazy at, but if the waitress is rude, brings the wrong plate 2x, keeps racking up obnoxious points--like I'm the problem and she's not there to wait on me--I left a dime on a 50$ lunch.

writerterri
03-28-2008, 09:58 PM
If you wanted to be technical, during :D you're always getting 'tipped.' *snicker* Maybe he's been overtipping you all along.

I think you're right. :D

writerterri
03-28-2008, 10:09 PM
How exactly is this anywhere near abuse?

Barring weight loss/gain, adults generally stay one size. I can get years of wear out of new clothes. Kids, however, can outgrow clothing within six months of buying it (especially babies and toddlers). There is a resale shop around here that specializes is children's clothing for that very reason. Why spend eight bucks on a pair of pants your six-year old will outgrow in a year, when you can spend a dollar and get eight pairs?


Wow! My kids outdue their clothes within a month. I kid you not. And shirts within a week. Shoes take about 3 or 4 months. I go to Savers thrift store. Excelent for kids clothing and they always have stuff on 50% off.

joyce
03-29-2008, 07:36 AM
My dad washes paper plates and cups, not once but as often as he can. He has owned the same pair of shoes for as long as I can remember, when a hole occured in the sole he simply duct taped it- and replaces the duct tape when it wears out.
he never leaves a tip, but that's ok- I can't remember the last time they went out to dinner- he will not allow my mother to but fresh fruits or veggies out of season- somethimes not even in season.

He cuts his own hair and prides himself on taking very short very cold showers, and never uses deoderant because "Its extravagant"

I hate to sit next to him if he lived here in Florida.:D

Kerr
03-29-2008, 08:48 AM
My Dad who had six kids who all went on to have kids of our own, pretended not to have a clue where the food was coming from for the first month I stayed while Mom was in the hospital. I had taken over where my sister left off, buying for the whole lot of us coming and going while visiting. As winter approached, I had to say something to Mom, knowing how work slows hereabouts in winter. I mean there would be nothing left for reserve for my OH at home, while my father lived comfortably on two pensions--and needed my help. My mother couldn't talk, but got the message across. The poor guy! I think when mom went into the hospital, he decided he was at last in control and finally going to save money. How bad do you need to save when you're eighty?

So, it came as kind of a shock when he yelled at me for using too much toilet paper. Too much toilet paper? How do you use too much toilet paper? You use however much you need to use. "I use four squares," he said, and proceeded to tear them off and fold them to show how it could be done. That's what he was taught when he was young and had been doing it all his life. Well, what the heck, he did live through the Great Depression. I loved my dad to pieces though we've had a few issues over a lifetime, but I never realized he was anal. I guess that was because my mother hadn't let him get away with it.

maestrowork
03-29-2008, 07:50 PM
My friend and I went to a fast food place once. After the meal, he went to the counter and grabbed, like, 20 sets of plastic utensils and a huge stack of napkins, plus ketchup packets, etc. I asked him what he was doing. And he said he ran out of supplies at home -- he did that every time he went to a fast food place. I was very amused.



Then she came to the bar and bought a beer with the money that someone else had intended for me. Classic.


That's when you should turn around and spit in her drink. Some extra protein would do her brain some good.

maestrowork
03-29-2008, 07:59 PM
Another time I was working in New York. A friend of mine, who was a local, took me out to dinner. First, he "let" me pay for the whole thing because he "implied" that I was on business expense anyway. Then we went back to the hotel for some drinks -- again, he "let" me pay for the drinks. Then he said he wanted to see my room (it was kind of a fancy hotel) and watch TV. Then he just wouldn't leave, and asked if he could stay over because he worked in town and didn't want to take the train home. He could just walk from the hotel to work in the morning.

I said no. Thank you very much. You can leave now, because I am tired and I need to go to bed.

And another time, I was staying at his place in New Jersey to save money. I told him I wasn't going to drive in Manhattan -- so I took the train and did some sightseeing, and we were to get together later for dinner. When the time came, he drove my car into town and double parked on the street (because, of course, he couldn't find parking spaces in Manhattan). I asked him why he did that, and he said he had a leased car and he didn't want to put miles on it, and he could save a few bucks not taking the train in.

jessicaorr
03-29-2008, 08:48 PM
heh, heh. My stepfather used to flush his toilet once a week, regardless of what had occurred in the bowl, to save water.


Guess he's never heard that if "it's brown flush it down, if it's yellow let it mellow" ;)

thethinker42
03-29-2008, 08:50 PM
What's your experience with the cheap people of this world?

I dated a guy who would NEVER order anything at a restaurant unless it was the special, because he REFUSED to pay the menu prices. I mean, we're not exactly talking about Ruth's Chris Steakhouse here...just the local cafe where ordering the "special" means saving $1 on your meatloaf. It didn't matter if it's what he wanted, if it was the daily special, he'd order it.

I also knew a girl who would order a $0.99 thing of chicken nuggets at a fast food joint, then ask for a bun (which they never charged her for). She'd get some ketchup and mustard, put the nuggets on the bun, and had a chicken sandwich. (Of course, if I offered to BUY lunch, she'd buy the whole meal...)

My relatives still laugh about my late grandfather's cheap tendencies. In fact, after his funeral, we went to Denny's to have breakfast "the way Grandpa would order it": "We're all having the $1.99 Grand Slams, and all with water, no orange juice."

thethinker42
03-29-2008, 08:53 PM
He'd 'rescue' out-of-date things from the dumpster of the grocery store where he worked, including a palette of condoms gone past their prime. Ergo, I have a twenty-three year old sister who was the most expensive money-saving gambit of his life.

Perks wins...lock thread.

thethinker42
03-29-2008, 09:00 PM
I wait tables part time. The people who ask for water, extra sugar and lots of lemons and then proceed to make their own lemonade. (and we actually have lemonade to sell) As soon as I see it, I know my tip is doomed. I understand if you want to save a little by not paying for drinks, but for Pete's sake, order water!

I admittedly do this when I go to dinner, minus the sugar. The reason I do it is that I prefer to order water (and nix the sugar in most other drinks), but the water here is SO. GROSS. I have to load it up with lemons so that I can drink it without gagging. (Unless they have bottled water, of course)

But I tip very, very well. :)

maestrowork
03-29-2008, 09:07 PM
My cousin is a notoriously bad tipper. Once, after a $50 meal, she put down $1 on the table. I was horrified (I was a waiter at the time), so when they were leaving the restaurant, I secretly put down some money. I was so embarrassed.

My mom is very generous with other people but very cheap when it comes to herself. And very typically Chinese. We don't have garbage bags -- she just uses whatever grocery bags she can find. Also, tin cans from everywhere. She collects them so she can put things in them. Once I came home and found they pinned the bottom half of a Sucrets can on the wall so they could put the caller ID box on it. I almost died laughing. It's so cheap.

RLB
03-29-2008, 09:22 PM
I admittedly do this when I go to dinner, minus the sugar. The reason I do it is that I prefer to order water (and nix the sugar in most other drinks), but the water here is SO. GROSS. I have to load it up with lemons so that I can drink it without gagging. (Unless they have bottled water, of course)

But I tip very, very well. :)

Oh, there's a huge difference between the water-with-extra-lemon crowd (and I am one of those too if the water is nasty; I usually order water out) and the make-your-own-lemonade crowd. Trust me.

Maryn
03-29-2008, 10:54 PM
Ray, that reminded me of my mother in law, may she rest in peace. A Depression-era housewife, she thought a tip of 25 cents was fine for a taxi ride that ran eight or ten dollars. (And taxis were slow to pick her up when she called for one. Go figure.)

Mom thought no meal's service was worth a tip of over two dollars. When she took our family out to eat, Mr. Maryn and I always planned to have enough cash in the right bills to leave a decent tip, one of us going back to the table for something.

I don't know that she was cheap so much as clueless.

Maryn, who's no doubt clueless in other ways