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Crosshatcher
03-29-2005, 03:19 AM
As an avid Science Fiction reader in my youth I cared little for the paradoxes brought about in most time travel stories. After I began to write my tastes took on a more logical track. A affected B which affected C and so forth.

As much as I loved the entire Star Trek group of series every time they had a time travel story I was left quite irritated; especially the way Voyager ended.

About the only book I liked was HG Wells' "Time Machine". I lose interest with others as the anomalies pile up.

What do you think about time travel stories? Is there a book you would recomend or not? I'd like to know.

clintl
03-29-2005, 03:34 AM
Like anything, time travel can be handled either well or poorly. Some books I can immediately think of that handle it well are:

Fritz Leiber's The Big Time
Gene Wolfe's The Book of the New Sun
John Kessel's Corrupting Dr. Nice
Gregory Benford's Timescape

mdin
03-29-2005, 06:08 AM
I've always liked time travel stories. I'm pretty easy to please, though. The only one I can think of that I truly didn't like was Crichton's _Timeline_.

I really liked Dean Koontz' _Lightning_.

NicoleJLeBoeuf
03-29-2005, 06:33 AM
While it's not really my taste now, I was an avid reader of Anne McCaffrey's Pern books back in my early teens. So while I'm not sure that Dragonflight is necessarily an example of time travel done right, I can say that reading it was the first time that a time loop plot made me go all weak and shivery and teary-eyed just contemplating the enormity of it all. Maybe it was my first time encountering that kind of plot at all, but there was something... numinous, I guess, hiding between the lines, and it pounced on me.

The other book that had a similar effect on me--same time period--was a YA novel called ... you know what? I can't remember! It involved two kids, a magician, a monkey, and an heirloom locket that got thrown through a magic mirror and into a time loop. I want to say "Other Side Of The Mirror," but searching on that title gets me MZB/Darkover, a Harlequin title, and a murder mystery. Poot.

DaveKuzminski
03-29-2005, 06:41 AM
My first published fiction was a short story involving time travel. It was a fun story that depended upon paradoxes to be a story. Essentially, a guy enters a time travel agency where he's asked where he wants to go. During the conversation, the clerk keeps changing into different people because of changes brought about by some other time traveler. Eventually, our hapless visitor is also changed a few times. It was titled "Dead Time" and saw publication in print in Keen Science Fiction.

katiemac
03-29-2005, 07:38 AM
Dave, that sounds great! Good for you.

whitehound
03-31-2005, 05:22 AM
The other book that had a similar effect on me--same time period--was a YA novel called ... you know what? I can't remember! It involved two kids, a magician, a monkey, and an heirloom locket that got thrown through a magic mirror and into a time loop. I want to say "Other Side Of The Mirror," but searching on that title gets me MZB/Darkover, a Harlequin title, and a murder mystery. Poot.
I had a poke about on abebooks and found "On the Far Side of the Mirror" by BB Hiller and Neil W Hiller, pub. Scholastic 1986. I can't find any details of the plot but this is illustrated children's fiction, and so is probably your bird.

NicoleJLeBoeuf
03-31-2005, 05:38 AM
I had a poke about on abebooks and found "On the Far Side of the Mirror" by BB Hiller and Neil W Hiller, pub. Scholastic 1986. I can't find any details of the plot but this is illustrated children's fiction, and so is probably your bird.Chapter book with illustrations here and there, yes--I think you've found it. Great sleuthing!

Julie Worth
03-31-2005, 05:43 AM
Is there a book you would recomend or not? I'd like to know.

I'd recommend An Idiot's Guide to Time Travel.

Nateskate
04-01-2005, 03:31 AM
As an avid Science Fiction reader in my youth I cared little for the paradoxes brought about in most time travel stories. After I began to write my tastes took on a more logical track. A affected B which affected C and so forth.

As much as I loved the entire Star Trek group of series every time they had a time travel story I was left quite irritated; especially the way Voyager ended.

About the only book I liked was HG Wells' "Time Machine". I lose interest with others as the anomalies pile up.

What do you think about time travel stories? Is there a book you would recomend or not? I'd like to know.

Marty, it's all in the flux capacitor! Most time travel is simply entertainment. I teasingly did a little time travel story, then deleted it on the AW Idol contest. But it was a poke at humor. In it I had two roomates at M.I.T, and one of them was convinced that time was moving backward.

His roomates obvious question was, "Then why are you talking forward". And as the story went on, you had the countless paradoxes, which became tongue twisters in the story.

In it, the only constant was this journal that had entries for six months into the future, but since everything else was going backwards, he could predict the next days events by reading his "yesterday's" entry. And then tomorrow (which is actually yesterday), he would read the next earliest entry, which would be his next tomorrow. And eventually, he convinces his roomate that time is going backward.

Well, this makes tomorrow yesterday, and yesterday tomorrow. And today is tomorrow, and yesterday at the same time.

I shouldn't have deleted it. It'd be a hoot of a screenplay.

DaveKuzminski
04-01-2005, 08:01 AM
Dead Time

by Atk. Butterfly



I read the ad. It sounded interesting. It seemed like a natural winner, especially for history buffs, history professors, and psychopaths. I mean, what better way was there to spend a vacation than going back in time to fight in the war or battle of your choice? For historians, both professional and amateur, it was the opportunity of a lifetime to finally address some of the questions about various battles and wars. I mean, who wouldn't want to know why some things happened and others didn't? I was certainly curious about such matters, though I had no urge to travel back in time to find out for myself. I could always read the book on my terminal at home when some of the vacationers returned and published their experiences. Still, I wondered why the travel company wasn't offering something besides battles or wars. That was why I entered the small shop to ask the clerk behind the counter.

The young blond female clerk looked up at me and said, "You look like you're interested in the American Civil War."

"Sorry, ma'am, but no. I wanted to find out if your company offers anything besides battles and wars," I replied.

"Oh, certainly! We also have a fine selection of riots, gang fights, and shootouts," she answered sweetly.

"I meant, don't you offer anything non-violent?"

The male clerk looked at me and said, "You want something non-violent? What kind of a vacation is that? What's to tell when you get back home? You'd actually tell your neighbor that you went back in time to actually watch someone sew a flag or cross-breed peas? Someone as big and macho looking as yourself? Oh! I know what you'd be more interested in. How about a Viking raid? You'll not only get to go around killing people, but you'll get to pillage villages and rape the women! Of course, you have to kill them afterwards. Can't be mixing up the gene pool back then with material from the present."

I was startled. Here was this red-haired and very feminine beauty, wearing the skimpiest of clothing, telling me that I could have fun raping women in the past. "You think it's all right for your customers to go back into the past to rape and kill?" I asked.

"What's not all right about it? Those people are already dead. They can't possibly get any deader by now. Besides, it's all history. Whether you do it or not, someone is going to kill those people," she answered.

"Yeah? What happens if I should accidentally kill one of my ancestors?" I asked.

"Well, you'll never feel a thing if you do," the bald-headed man in the rumpled coat replied. "You want a vacation or not?"

I looked up at the counter and said, "I think I'll have to ask my mommy if I can go."

The ravishing, black-haired woman in the business suit said, "Yes, you should ask your mother about something like this. After all, we don't often send little girls back in time without a chaperon."

"Thank you, ma'am," I replied to the nearly nude, brunette, female clerk as I picked up my briefcase. I wondered if they provided weapons or if I would have to buy my own?


}|{ the end }|{

whitehound
04-02-2005, 05:59 AM
The most complicated, yet best-worked-out time-travel story I know is Hexwood by Diana Wynne Jones. It involves a machine which plays around with time and tries to get a situation to work out the way it wants by jumping the characters back and forth to replay scenes over and over in random order, so that their subjective and objective chronologies are completely out of synch - and five people who share a telepathic link even though some of them are living centuries apart.

I think the *creepiest* story I've read like that was not so much time travel as parellel worlds. I think it might have been by Poul Anderson (comments, anyone?) but it's about 25 years since I read it so I'm not sure. It involved a character setting out from a pub into a heavy mist which filled the street outside, but the mist actually was a blurring of the boundaries between parallels. Every time there was a mist he would walk into it, trying to get back where he came from, but instead he kept drifting further and further from his point of origin and the worlds kept getting wierder. In the end he stopped going into mist *at all.* Anyone remember it?

Anatole Ghio
04-02-2005, 06:29 AM
There is a reference manual for scince fiction writers wanting to do a time travel story. It is "Time Travel: a writers guide to the real science of plausible time travel" by Paul Nahin. It is a current book and I reccomend it for research.