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honeycomb
03-18-2008, 03:52 PM
Can you greet someone with "respectful indifference"?

writin52
03-18-2008, 04:47 PM
Hmmmm...if you are indifferent,would you bother to have respect for them? How about "polite indifference", that implies that despite your indifference, you are trying to be polite which is something you may want to be even if you are indifferent.

sheadakota
03-18-2008, 04:55 PM
Why not just indifference? then you could go on to describe the person's aloofness or whatever.

seun
03-18-2008, 05:22 PM
Can you greet someone with "respectful indifference"?

Sounds like a contradiction to me. If you're indifferent to someone, I doubt you'd respect them.

III
03-18-2008, 05:35 PM
I immediately thought of meeting a politician who you didn't know much about but who had a less-than-stellar reputation. Or possibly an atheist getting dragged to Mass and having to shake the Priest's hand afterward. "Respectful indifference". I like that phrase, as long as the context supports it.

StoryG27
03-18-2008, 05:42 PM
Indifference, to me, just means you don't give a dern. IMO, you could truly not care but still be respectful.

DWSTXS
03-18-2008, 06:08 PM
how about 'barely concealed indifference'

James81
03-18-2008, 06:19 PM
I think it's great.

In the wonderful world of writing, such contradicting writing is exactly what makes a piece fresh. Shaking things up, making the reader THINK about HOW to treat someone with "respectful indifference" is brilliant actually.

Exir
03-19-2008, 01:15 PM
As long as it doesn't pop out of nowhere... The phase itself is contradictory, so set up the character in a contradictory situation before using that phrase. Just my 2 cents.

Maryn
03-19-2008, 04:47 PM
I've given respectful indifference to many, many teachers, bosses, and other figures of authority. You have to pretend to listen, to care, to respect, but the reality inside your head is who-gives-a-rat's-ass.

Nice turn of phrase.

Maryn, who'd use it

seun
03-19-2008, 05:26 PM
I think it's great.

In the wonderful world of writing, such contradicting writing is exactly what makes a piece fresh. Shaking things up, making the reader THINK about HOW to treat someone with "respectful indifference" is brilliant actually.

Hmm..there's a fine line between making the reader think about something like this and throwing them out of the story to the point where they question what the writer means.

Matera the Mad
03-20-2008, 05:02 AM
One could be indifferent to another person's appearance or disabilities out of respect. In that context there is no contradiction.

Birol
03-20-2008, 05:10 AM
I like the phrase, but ignoring that, let's turn this around. What does 'respectful indifference' mean to you?

kimmer
03-21-2008, 07:28 AM
I have experienced this on only a few occasions. I may respect someone's work in their profession but I have no passion or interest in it. I respect what they have done for their constituency, and the sacrifices they have made, but it doesn't affect me and I don't necessarily support their organization or fully agree with them.

Riley
03-21-2008, 07:56 AM
Indifference: Quality of being indifferent

Indifferent: marked by impartiality; unbiased; apathetic



Respectful: marked by showing respect or deference

Respect: an act of giving particular attention; consideration; esteem



So, not really. You're basically saying "impartial esteem" or "unbiased consideration" or even "apathetic attention". It could work, but it sounds rough. I think the phrase is more of a turn of phrase--is that the right phrase? It sounds nice, doesn't it? Respectful indifference?

spike
03-21-2008, 05:03 PM
I've been respectfully indifferent many times. What comes to mind is conversations with my inlaws.

My brother in law would say something inane and catty about (the neighbors, the president, a celeb) and I would reply "Oh really?" or "I didn't know that" or "You don't say"

However, the respect I was showing was for my husband, who was unfortunately born into a family of idiots.

BlueTexas
03-22-2008, 12:03 AM
I'd use it. I'd also use courteous indifference, since it's a bit milder than respectful.

kristie911
03-22-2008, 12:50 AM
I like the phrase. I'd use it.

~Kristie, who wishes she could think of things like this! :)

StephanieFox
03-22-2008, 03:44 AM
No apparent disrespect?

honeycomb
03-22-2008, 08:18 PM
Thank you all. I think I'm going to keep it because the "yeahs" hit the point I was trying to make.

You're all so wonderful!

Wolvel
03-23-2008, 07:28 AM
Can you greet someone with "respectful indifference"?

Yes but they may get mad at you.:D