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inkkognito
03-15-2008, 02:41 AM
"You take it on faith, you take it to the heart, the waiting is the hardest part..."

I can hear that song running through my head, and it describes my current position so well. I'm at one of those dry spells where I have a sheaf of queries and articles out, but no responses seem to be coming in. That seems to happen every now and then, and it never gets any easier. Freelance writing is not a professional for those with a need for immediate gratification...ugh!

steveg144
03-16-2008, 01:07 AM
You are busy writing new work while you wait, right? You must, otherwise you'll go Quite Mad(tm) with the waiting. Trust me on this one. ;-)

Stew21
03-16-2008, 01:12 AM
I'm impatient by nature so I know this feeling. I hate it. The best way to get through it is just like steveg said, write something else.

KikiteNeko
03-16-2008, 09:27 AM
Dear Agent:

Thank you for requesting my full manuscript. I understand that you receive a lot of submissions and I am honored that you feel my manuscript is worth a glance. However, I must follow up and see if you have yet come to a decision. You see, my cat is starving. I haven't been able to afford kitten chow as I quit my job as a circus elephant dung-scooper to work on my writing (the smell was interfering with my ability to concentrate). So, as you see, it is of the upmost importance that you respond at your soonest convenience. If not sooner. Yesterday, in fact, would have been great.

I mean, it's been fifteen minutes.

Best,

The author of a starving cat.

Dale Emery
03-17-2008, 02:25 AM
"You take it on faith, you take it to the heart, the waiting is the hardest part..."

That was Tom Petty, who also said, "Coming down is the hardest thing."

So which is harder, coming down or the waiting? And did Tom change his mind, or is he one o' them dad-blamed flip-floppers?

I'd ask him directly, but for some reason he ain't returning my emails...

Dale

Mr Flibble
03-17-2008, 02:35 AM
I find that waiting is not nearly so hard as the two seconds before I actually open the reply.

KikiteNeko
03-17-2008, 02:41 AM
Well said. As a defense mechanism I'm like "oh yay my rejection is here" automatically. Then if I'm wrong it's like a little Christmas on my laptop.


I find that waiting is not nearly so hard as the two seconds before I actually open the reply.

LC030308
03-19-2008, 11:35 AM
They do say patience is a virtue... ( I'm going crazy waiting for the publishing world to decide on my novel). Maybe I should work more OT.

KikiteNeko
03-19-2008, 11:39 AM
I'm rolling around never getting any kind of sleep at all, wondering about my partials and fulls.

inkkognito
03-19-2008, 09:58 PM
Yep, I've continued my work diligently but I still listen fretfully for the mailman and watch for new emails. In the meantime, I've gotten one rejection, one acceptance, and one query returned "undeliverable" because the publication moved.

Of course, the responses I am waiting for most desperately show no signs of coming in any time soon. Sigh!

Polenth
03-19-2008, 11:56 PM
I find that waiting is not nearly so hard as the two seconds before I actually open the reply.

That's how I feel. I don't obsess about the answer when a story is in the slush pile. It's when the reply is there, but I don't know what it says.

Michael Davis
03-20-2008, 11:52 PM
You are right, waiting takes a toll on your spirit and you're desire to continue. When I started I set a goal of two years to succeed or fail. I was two months away from saying "the heck with it all", when in the same day I got two stories accepted, and a week later another. I've since come to learn that was very naive and that many truly successful writers go 5, 6, or 7 years till they break the barrier. Funny thing is how look some editors take to respond. I actually had two come back voicing interest 12 and 14 months after I submitted. I had already signed with someone else, but the lag time was amazing to me.

Big Mike

Michael Davis
Davisstories.com - “Stories that touch the heart and mind"
TheWritersVineyard.com
Tainted Hero, “Sometimes good people do bad things for the right reasons.” Champagne books,Dec 07
Forgotten Children, “Greed is blind to human suffering.” Champagne books,July 08
Blind Consent, “Where the heart and mind collide.” 09
The Treasure, “A lonely heart can impair one’s judgment.” Forbidden Speculation paperback, Dec 07

JacobWorld
03-21-2008, 07:47 AM
I have to agree with the other posts .
I am just to busy to think about stuff like this .
There is me and my calender - I try to write all there so I don't forget .
Its a great tool not to forget and of course my mobile .

KTC
03-21-2008, 07:49 AM
I absolutely need instant gratification. Actually, I need everything instant. I expect answers immediately. I expect everything immediately. I drive everybody around me crazy. I am the 'refresh' king.

steveg144
03-21-2008, 01:45 PM
Well said. As a defense mechanism I'm like "oh yay my rejection is here" automatically. Then if I'm wrong it's like a little Christmas on my laptop.

With me it's more like "oh, a rejection (or two, or three....). Good reminder for me to submit more work, better get out the manila envelopes and a fresh pack of paper and start stamping those SASEs....." :-)

EriRae
03-21-2008, 05:57 PM
I agree...waiting is the hardest. The pain of rejection is much better than the floating expectation of waiting. At least you know where you stand and can plan on trying again.

Writing helps to pass the time, no matter what you're waiting for.

inkkognito
03-21-2008, 06:21 PM
Even worse than waiting is a looming spouse. Whenever I get a snail mail response, if my husband sees it he is even more excited than I am to see what's inside. If he brings in the mail, he'll weight it in his hands and say, "Uh oh, heavy. Bad!" (i.e. manuscript inside) or "This is a light one. Maybe it's a contract!" I like to discover celebration or rejection on my own, but he always wants to share in the victory of the sale or the agony of defeat. Good thing most of my responses come via email so I can suffer or celebration in silence before sharing them.