PDA

View Full Version : Qinglish- Chinese version of English



JacobWorld
03-12-2008, 03:37 AM
I am in China and most of them are learning English but because there are so many students, most of the teachers are Chinese . There is not enough native English speakers .
The problem that arises is they make the same mistakes and they start speaking qinginglish with the same mistakes .
Because there are so meny Chinese and they have a great influence on the world economy will this be a thread to English language itself .

I even notice I start using words incorrectly!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

HeronW
03-12-2008, 03:53 AM
Many who do speak English correctly will give the corrections. If the non-native speaker is honest with himself about his lack of expertise, he will ask for a native speaker for translating important documents such as medical, scientific, business and educational. Often I see things here in Israel translated to English, spelled wrong. Part of that is that Hebrew didn't have vowels per se until recently. While it may not matter to the Israelis, if they have foriegn/English speaking contacts, they will use translation services.

Mumut
03-12-2008, 04:57 AM
Not always, HeronW. If you look at some of the public notices in China they are often a direct translation and can be very funny.

ColoradoGuy
03-12-2008, 05:05 AM
I don't have any statistics, but it's my impression there are more English speakers who learned it as a second language than there are native speakers.

Cathy C
03-12-2008, 05:08 AM
I think there's a natural tendency in humans to adopt local phrases to "fit in." I spoke pretty much vanilla midwestern American English until I moved to Texas. For those who follow comedian Jeff Foxworthy---let me tell you, there really ARE words down here that don't exist anywhere else in the world.

What do you suppose might help Chinese students become accustomed to the very confusing language that is modern English, JacobWorld? There are so very many words in this language (and many of them contradict) that it's no wonder it's the most difficult language to master.

Hmm... :idea: Since this is the language room, I wonder if it might not be a good idea to have a sticky thread for some of the major world languages for translation purposes from those of us who live in the country. Something like: "Chinese to Conversational English", or "South American Spanish to Portuguese/Spain Spanish"

Or maybe just a simple, "Confused about the correct conversational English phrasing? Ask it here."

Just a thought... :)

Ruv Draba
03-12-2008, 02:15 PM
Many who do speak English correctly will give the corrections. If the non-native speaker is honest with himself about his lack of expertise, he will ask for a native speaker for translating important documents such as medical, scientific, business and educational.
And yet the US invented its own English dictionary, and for largely ideological and nationalistic reasons, kept the semantics and just respelled the words to suit its emerging pronunciation. (Go Noah Webster!)

If the US can do it (and insist on it being an International default in virtually all its office software), what is to stop another emerging economic superpower from doing the same?

StephanieFox
03-15-2008, 09:45 PM
Hebrew didn't have vowels per se until recently. While it may not matter to the Israelis, if they have foriegn/English speaking contacts, they will use translation services.[/quote]


Most modern Hebrew still does not use vowels, and for those who are no familiar with the language, this can make reading difficult. Names, especially, can be a guessing game.

Hollan
03-16-2008, 06:55 AM
My English started going downhill b/c of Japan. I started sounding like GW and it scares the hell out of me. But Engrish (or Japangrish) is really funny.

JacobWorld
03-16-2008, 07:43 AM
I am with you . I have been here for 2.5 years and my spelling is crap . The same with vocab .
Its unreal

JBI
03-16-2008, 08:34 AM
No, because English media will shape them. Besides which, they are importing teachers by in vast numbers, and once their economy gets to a certain point, they will hire a great many more people to teach English, to the point where their language will be a formalized variation of our spoken language.

maxmordon
03-16-2008, 08:34 AM
Something similar happens to both my dad (Spent 10 years on New York) and my grandfather (spent a lot of his youth with France). According to my father is a common phenomenon to start to forget your own language after a while living in another country, is something cerebral

ColoradoGuy
03-16-2008, 08:54 AM
No, because English media will shape them. Besides which, they are importing teachers by in vast numbers, and once their economy gets to a certain point, they will hire a great many more people to teach English, to the point where their language will be a formalized variation of our spoken language.
Or perhaps they will develop their own version of English which, owing to the huge size of China, will evolve in its own direction, maybe even producing its own literature in the same way post-colonial societies have done.

JBI
03-16-2008, 09:26 AM
I don't think it is likely, due to the advancement in communications. As a second language, the bulk of art coming into that country in English will be foreign. I doubt that the Chinese will teach English as a first language, and therefore rely on the outside world for its linguistic influence. On another note, the language is being used to ease communications with the outside world; this would make the idea of a different dialect of English less appealing, and less likely.

ColoradoGuy
03-16-2008, 09:37 AM
On the contrary, I think it highly likely. Language evolves to meet local needs and conditions, world-wide communication notwithstanding. I'm not suggesting English will achieve first language status in China. I do think, however, it will ultimately assume a unique form there, if nothing else because of the enormous size of the Chinese population.

JBI
03-16-2008, 09:44 AM
Yes, but if it is unintelligible to the American, than it will essentially be useless. Out of necessity it needs to be functional as a language of communication between nations.

ColoradoGuy
03-16-2008, 09:49 AM
I did not say it would be unintelligible to Americans--that would make it something other than English. I think it is likely to develop its own unique forms and usage, much as English has done throughout the former British Empire.

Robert Toy
03-16-2008, 10:01 AM
I don't have any statistics, but it's my impression there are more English speakers who learned it as a second language than there are native speakers.
Here is an interesting stat:

http://www2.ignatius.edu/faculty/turner/languages.htm

ETA: Someone once told me that the Philippines is the 2nd largest English speaking country!

JacobWorld
03-17-2008, 08:08 AM
You would be surprised about Phillipiness . Some of them can speak better English than US

mjlpsu
03-17-2008, 01:52 PM
I tend to get my laughs by reading signs and menus here in China. I do get depressed when I talk to some of my students and realize I can't understand anything they say unless it's in Chinese.

Some of my favorites: Please stay swim the shark nets.
Swims has the hiring
Watch out run into me! (since removed from the Jusco store)
Look out knock head
randomly cooks (on a menu in Yangshuo)

WildScribe
03-26-2008, 08:01 AM
As a freelancer I get a pretty unique view of Chinese English, and that is of a person trying to rewrite articles that were originally outsourced to China. I only made that mistake once, as the articles were so unintelligible that I had to do a total rewrite.

Priene
03-26-2008, 05:39 PM
randomly cooks (on a menu in Yangshuo)

Hey, I think I might have eaten that when I was in Yangshuo.

JacobWorld
04-03-2008, 11:01 AM
Read this article from my website . Its written by Chinese .
its not bad . The whole idea is they perceive life in a different way .
This affects their English
http://www.worldpolis.com/index.php?module=details_article&act=Details_article&aid=209&ridd=196

ColoradoGuy
04-03-2008, 07:30 PM
Uh, Jacob--I fear you're coming across as being little on the spectrum of blogwhore-ish to spam-ish. Why not just give us your thoughts in a post here?

JacobWorld
04-13-2008, 10:59 AM
Uh, Jacob--I fear you're coming across as being little on the spectrum of blogwhore-ish to spam-ish. Why not just give us your thoughts in a post here?
I would like to respond to it.
No I am not - I am teaching English in China so I am showing you examples. 3 years now.
I have to deal with qinglish everyday so I am becoming an expert

bluntforcetrauma
04-13-2008, 11:04 AM
Chinese and they have a great influence on the world economy will this be a thread to English language itself .

No! Not that! Please don't let it be a thread to the English language! Help us all! ;)