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NancyMehl
03-08-2008, 02:42 AM
Does anyone know the largest size for a "transfer tank" used to transfer diesel fuel from a storage tank to farm equipment? This tank would fit into the bed of a full size pickup.

I've found conflicting information. Anywhere from 110 gallons to 3 or 4 hundred.

Thanks!

Nancy

CasualObserver
03-08-2008, 03:05 AM
The most common are the 1500 gallon tanks they set underground. If they're big enough to need their own tank for all that equipment, they don't usually go for anything less than the biggest available. If you're looking for the aboveground tanks, they typically run 300-500 gallons and are just as often filled with regular gasoline; when you live so far out that the nearest gas station is a quarter of a tank of gas away, you see the convenience of having your own fuel on the property.

Diesel sold for "agricultural purposes" is usually not taxed. This makes it much cheaper than gas station diesel - which farmers like - but can theoretically run vehicles that will not be performing argicultural duties - which the state that waived their taxes doesn't like. So when these tanks are filled, the petrol company adds a red dye to the tank. State troopers can and will test your truck's tank with a dipstick to see if you're cruising to town on illegal diesel.

NancyMehl
03-08-2008, 03:37 AM
The most common are the 1500 gallon tanks they set underground. If they're big enough to need their own tank for all that equipment, they don't usually go for anything less than the biggest available. If you're looking for the aboveground tanks, they typically run 300-500 gallons and are just as often filled with regular gasoline; when you live so far out that the nearest gas station is a quarter of a tank of gas away, you see the convenience of having your own fuel on the property.

Diesel sold for "agricultural purposes" is usually not taxed. This makes it much cheaper than gas station diesel - which farmers like - but can theoretically run vehicles that will not be performing argicultural duties - which the state that waived their taxes doesn't like. So when these tanks are filled, the petrol company adds a red dye to the tank. State troopers can and will test your truck's tank with a dipstick to see if you're cruising to town on illegal diesel.

Thanks for the info. But what I'm really looking for is the size of transfer tanks, the kind that are put into the beds of pickup trucks. These tanks are filled from the main storage tank and carried to various pieces of farm equipment so they can be fueled. I've been told that they can be up to 500 gallons, but I am just trying to confirm that. I think any pickup truck would have a hard time with "stop and go" carrying that much fuel!

jclarkdawe
03-08-2008, 04:25 AM
Weight is the factor here. Diesel weighs about 7.5 pounds per gallon, although it varies with the season. So 100 gallons weighs 750 pounds and five hundred gallons would weigh 3,750 pounds.

Next thing to figure is the size of the pickup. A one ton dually could probably handle 500 gallons, but if you put that in a half ton, you'd bust your suspension and axle.

There are limits as to where you need a tank endorsement on your license depending on the state. I think 500 gallons is fine, but I'm not sure.

The bigger the tank, the more permanent it becomes. Securing two tons isn't easy, especially when you factor in a slosh factor. (As you drive down the road, without baffles, fluids move. That shifting weight will influence your truck big time.)

Most of the transfer tanks I've seen are in the 100 or less gallon range. It doesn't take up too much room in the bed, can be easily mounted permanently, and don't break the bank too badly when you fill it up.

Best of luck,

Jim Clark-Dawe

Puma
03-08-2008, 04:56 AM
Jim's post about the sloshing fuel made me laugh. A couple years ago our fuel oil delivery man got stuck because the fuel sloshed and put him in a snow drift off the driveway. Puma

NancyMehl
03-09-2008, 07:18 AM
Thanks, everyone. You confirmed what I was told by someone else. Confirmation is important!

You guys rock!

Nancy