PDA

View Full Version : Unique's Stop Smoking Experience with Chantix



Unique
03-05-2008, 05:30 AM
Because I've been asked, because it's the right thing to do, I'm going to tell you a little story. This is a true story. Minus a few (quite a few) details so ... settle in.

Does Chantix work? Yes it does. At least it did for me. However, the side effects can be brutal.

I said 'can be'. Not everyone has side effects. Some people use it and have NO side effects whatsoever. Other people have committed suicide.

For real.

Obviously, I'm not one of them. However - it did cross my mind. In a very weird sort of way. Let me explain.

I'm feeling okay. Just the usual and I'm getting ready to go to bed. I lie down ... and WHAMMO. All of a sudden I'm depressed. VERY depressed. And I think to myself, 'I'll just go to sleep. That's what I usually do when I get depressed and I feel better when I wake up.'

And sure enough, when I woke up, I felt 'back to normal'. Then I sat up. And, WHAMMO. Depressed again. So I think to myself, 'Self, this is stupid. What's different today than yesterday?'

'Nothing'

'Then what's your problem?'

Good question, eh? That happened twice in a row (as in two days in a row more or less - it's hard to remember exactly)

So I go into the kitchen and I think, 'I'm going to read the package insert'. Okay. Depression is listed on it as a possible side effect. In very light language.

So I go online and type in Chantix+depression. Oh. Wow. BIG oh, wow. But oddly enough - after I read through one interactive type site where people can comment ... ... ... it never happened again. Not once. Never depressed at all after that.

And I missed one part. In the time it took me to walk from the bedroom to the kitchen ... >POOF< The depression disappeared. Now anyone who has suffered from depression for real will tell you - it doesn't disappear like that. And I have a very small house. It took all of 20 seconds to go from Point A to Point B.

And even while I'm sitting in bed wondering what's going on, I'm wondering, 'I wonder what it feels like to slit your wrists'.

"WHAT"? I can almost hear you guys. But wait - I'm not thinking I'm going to do it. I'm not thinking I want to do it. I'm wondering what it feels like. Kind of curious like. Not depressed at this point. Just wondering what it feels like. 'Excuse me?' I thought that was kind of weird. Even at the time it was happening I remember thinking that was kind of weird to wonder what it feels like.

But wait - there's more!

So after I read all that stuff on line, I have no more depressions or freaky thoughts like that and then .... it happened.

My brain took off like a rocket ship and Mars wasn't the destination. I'll be honest. I was in another GALAXY. Way the heck out there. I was talking so fast my mouth couldn't even keep up with my brain.

I told my friends to tape me and then slow down the speed and they'd hear every thing I was saying. Only one friend could understand what I was really saying. Some of them could understand but only one could really follow the speed and the content.

The better you knew me, the more sense it made because you'd understand the context and the processes and the connections my mind was making. I won't lie - it was kind of fun. But it's not something I want to do again any time soon.

I basically sequestered myself so I wouldn't be hauled off to the hosptial. You know, the one where they have jackets with arms that tie in the back ... Because you see, I had something similar happen to me before so I knew what caused the problem.

I have atypical reactions to medications. I have to be hypervigilant when it comes to taking prescription drugs. I can feel what's happening while it's happening.

This weekend my mom told me there have been class actions filed against the company. It's a shame in a way because the product does work.

But wait! There's more!

I spoke to someone at the company (a safety officer he called himself) for about an hour after I came down far enough to talk and basically volunteered to be a guinea pig for them. But not for free. Not this time.

Too bad for them. It could have been a good thing for both of us. And as long as this whole thing is ... it's the short version.

Does the product work? YES. Unequivocally it does. (At least for me)
Is it dangerous? It sure can be. And that's what I was trying to tell the company when I called them.

It does work. But the side effects can be brutal. It works. Just not exactly the way they think it does.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it. So all ya'll that have asked me about it, feel free to get in touch. I knew what was happening to me because I'd seen it before. I'm sure it would be terrifying (and perhaps deadly) if nothing like that has ever happened to you.

And I would be remiss if I didn't say: Some people don't have any side effects at all. Zero. Zip. Zilch. (Or so they say)

One last thing and I'll open up the floor. I am still having residual after effects. I thought I was totally done and I was all back to right. But lately I'm not so sure. However, what I am experiencing can be explained away by a few other "issues" such as perimenopause, et.al.

So is it A, B, C, D, or all of the above? I have no clue. It might be one or the other or all the above but what I can say for sure is: I wasn't like this before I started and now I am.

Love ya's! Be careful out there.
>''<
I'll edit later.

JennaGlatzer
03-05-2008, 05:36 AM
I really appreciate that you shared this.

I quit cold turkey last January, despite that no one I knew thought I could ever do it. I had been smoking since I was 12.

I liked www.quitnet.com for support and having a place to check in and be held accountable.

I'm very, very glad I didn't ever get Chantix. I've now seen a couple of friends use it, to bad mental effects.

Perks
03-05-2008, 05:46 AM
Unique, we missed you for a bit. Thank you for posting this. It'll help people.

Siddow
03-05-2008, 05:55 AM
I had something similar happen to me before so I knew what caused the problem.

I have atypical reactions to medications.

This seems to be the common thread among people who have these kinds of reactions. I read about one woman who said that although she'd always had suicidal thoughts, they got worse while taking Chantix. Well, is it the Chantix?

It also seems that for those prone to depression, it gets worse with Chantix. But I imagine any brain-altering drug would have the same effect on someone who is prone to have an imbalance in their brain chemistry.

Anyhow, I'm planning to get off of it as quickly as possible. I've been on it two weeks, quit smoking five days ago, and only took .5mg today (a quarter of the dosage). I'm over the nicotine withdrawal, don't really see a need for the crutch anymore.

Silver King
03-05-2008, 05:57 AM
Thank you for sharing your story, Unique. :)

(I'm wondering if we could tweak your thread title a bit to let folks know that Chantix is a drug used to inhibit smoking? It might help to draw more people to this discussion.)

Unique
03-05-2008, 05:58 AM
The worst of it happened around Thanksgiving time. My MIA status was more of a $$ thing and a 'you need to quit procrastinating and DO THIS' than Chantix.

I really thought I was over and done with it but there are some moments when I wonder ...

It's not about my sanity; I've never claimed that, but a loss of focus, mini-panic attack like moments ... typos that don't really seem like typos... grammar and syntax errors when I try to write ... not being able to concentrate when I read... (okay, that's the 29th time you've tried to read that paragraph ...). Just stuff like that. Not anything that's going to kill me but an editor that can't concentrate on reading ... er ... not so good. Not to mention all the other "stuff" going on.

I was an excellent multi-tasker; I had been for years. Now sometimes two things are too much and even ONE thing can be too much if there are distractions.

It sux, dammit. pbbbttt.... :p

sunna
03-05-2008, 05:58 AM
Thanks for posting that. I quit 2 months ago, and Chantix was one of the avenues I considered. I talked to a lot of people who used Chantix to quit, and a few mentioned some weird side effects, but wouldn't go into detail. I ended up going cold turkey, because all the chemical options were less than appealing. (I had a terrible experience with the patch a few years ago, and am a bit wary of now of using drugs to get off drugs. :))

I'm going to dig around and see what I can find on class action suits against Pfizer, and bring this up to my boss if I can get anything solid...we have a quit smoking class we offer to our employees, and footing the bill for a Chantix prescription is part of the class. Mebbe we ought to be adding some big, bold cautionary statements to that offer.

Unique
03-05-2008, 06:03 AM
Thank you for sharing your story, Unique. :)

(I'm wondering if we could tweak your thread title a bit to let folks know that Chantix is a drug used to inhibit smoking? It might help to draw more people to this discussion.)

Whatever you think is best, Silver. I really didn't know what to call it.

'I've been through the desert ... '

Joanne told me I should tell back in December. I wasn't ready.I'm not sure I was able. I'm not sure I am ready and I'm probably messin' up my chances for a piece of the class action pie but yanno - my friends here are using this and they need to know what can happen.

Not that it will happen. Just that it can happen. That's the bitch of it. The drug does work. It really does. But ....

Who wants to play Russian Roulette with their brain?

(which is rather ironic when you think of what you do when you play that game. :p. It's more literal than you'd first think - )

Silver King
03-05-2008, 06:13 AM
...we have a quit smoking class we offer to our employees, and footing the bill for a Chantix prescription is part of the class. Mebbe we ought to be adding some big, bold cautionary statements to that offer.
That sounds like a huge liability issue for your employer, sunna. They shouldn't be recommending any type of drugs for their employees, let alone paying for them. It's a nice gesture on their part but woefully dangerous should any employee suffer adverse effects from the drug and the company be found negligent for supplying (paying for) the medication.

Silver King
03-05-2008, 06:18 AM
Whatever you think is best, Silver. I really didn't know what to call it...
How does this sound? Unique's Stop Smoking Experience with Chantix

I'm open to other suggestions. :)

rhymegirl
03-05-2008, 06:20 AM
It's not about my sanity; I've never claimed that, but a loss of focus, mini-panic attack like moments ... typos that don't really seem like typos... grammar and syntax errors when I try to write ... not being able to concentrate when I read... (okay, that's the 29th time you've tried to read that paragraph ...). Just stuff like that. Not anything that's going to kill me but an editor that can't concentrate on reading ... er ... not so good. Not to mention all the other "stuff" going on.

I was an excellent multi-tasker; I had been for years. Now sometimes two things are too much and even ONE thing can be too much if there are distractions.

Unique, I don't want to question any of this, but just say that what you said about menopause or peri-menopause can also be the culprit (or at least part of it)

I have some of the same things going on you mentioned. I have been having a lot of trouble concentrating. I can't concentrate well at all when I'm reading. I do that too--read the same paragraph over and over again. When I get in the car to go somewhere I sometimes forget where I'm going. I come out of the store into the parking lot and can't remember where I parked.

The only medication I take is blood pressure pills and it's a very low dose so I attribute all of the above to menopause.

And by the way, I've missed you, girl!

cray
03-05-2008, 06:24 AM
in feb the fda issued some warnings about these side effects prompting pfizer to roll out some new safety warnings.
ugh.

thanks for sharing, unique. :)

Silver King
03-05-2008, 06:39 AM
How does this sound? Unique's Stop Smoking Experience with Chantix
So we're all agreed that it sounds great?

Be right back...

sunna
03-05-2008, 06:42 AM
That sounds like a huge liability issue for your employer, sunna. They shouldn't be recommending any type of drugs for their employees, let alone paying for them. It's a nice gesture on their part but woefully dangerous should any employee suffer adverse effects from the drug and the company be found negligent for supplying (paying for) the medication.

I am starting to wonder if we ran it past our lawyers first... Mention the drug in the class and foot the bill; get smacked with a suit when somebody has an adverse reaction. Mention the possible side effects and the class-action suit, get demolished by Pfizer if they hear about it...

*sigh*

I see this program being neutered until it's a support group with paid time off. Pity. It's had a great track record. :(

I'll start asking at work tomorrow and see what comes up.


Unique, very glad you're doing better!

Unique
03-05-2008, 06:43 AM
Works for me, Silver King -

Rhyme - it could be. Is it? I don't know. I'm 47. Could I be starting menopause? I could be ... but am I? Was I prior? Not that I know of.

Could it be thyroid? could be. but ...
Could it be x, y, z? Could be. It could be a lot of things but the fact that I didn't have any problems like that BEFORE and now I do ...

I don't have the $$ for all those tests and for sure i'm not taking any new meds -

no no no no no.... i think all ya'll can understand that. :)

Unique
03-05-2008, 07:14 AM
ja, spooks. apropo, that. ;)

nah, spooky. you had it right. you just didn't have it write. i mean right, write, ... aw...

:D Your word order was groovin' :ROFL:

All ya'll crack me up.

See ya's later on.

SpookyWriter
03-05-2008, 07:18 AM
Glad to see you again. Take care.

Karen Duvall
03-05-2008, 07:23 AM
I used Zyban when I quit, combined with the patch. Worked great! Zyban is, of course, an antidepressant. I think I was on it a total of 6 weeks. Anyway, that was about 8 years ago and I never picked the habit back up again. I love being smoke-free. You will, too, Unique. Good luck!

Southern_girl29
03-05-2008, 07:58 AM
I took it, and I'm one of the ones who contacted Unique. I took Chantix for a month, and I've stopped smoking and haven't started again. However, since taking it, I've had even more trouble sleeping and developed something close to restless leg syndrome. I don't know if it was caused by the Chantix, but it could have been. I didn't really experience any kind of mental side effects, but I think it's because I'm constantly on a low dose of Lexapro.

My brother, however, took it and had some very bad side effects. His temper became very, very short and at one point, he punched a hole in the wall and told off my very sick grandmother (which is something he would never, ever do, because he absolutely adored her). He only took it for two weeks and stopped because of this. He is still having a problem with being short tempered but we don't know if it's because of the Chantix or because of grief after our granny died.

But, it did work. We both quit smoking and haven't started again.

Sean D. Schaffer
03-05-2008, 10:37 AM
I'm sorry you're going through all that bad stuff, Unique. But it is mighty good to see you again. I hope you feel better soon.

:)


--Sean

Medievalist
03-05-2008, 11:09 AM
Unique, I don't want to question any of this, but just say that what you said about menopause or peri-menopause can also be the culprit (or at least part of it)

No. I read a cartload of research.

This is Chantix.

And it's fucked, majorly. People have committed suicide because of the side effects; the detox can take eighteen months to two years, because residual chemicals reside in fatty tissues.

"Fatty tissues," btw is often a euphimism for the cerebral cortex.

Cassiopeia
03-05-2008, 12:57 PM
My daughter, as you all know quit using Crystal Meth three years ago. In finding medications to try and help her because that drug messed up her brain, we have seen some pretty weird side effects. Even still after three years, she's struggling to find the right chemical balance.

Do I think it's the medication. Yes, I do. It is quite reasonable to assume the drug has created some imbalances and that will take time.I don't think you're crazy or imagining this. I believe you.

I'm just glad you are back. I'm sorry you are going through this and I've missed you. :Hug2:

Cassiopeia
03-05-2008, 12:59 PM
No. I read a cartload of research.

This is Chantix.

And it's fucked, majorly. People have committed suicide because of the side effects; the detox can take eighteen months to two years, because residual chemicals reside in fatty tissues.

"Fatty tissues," btw is often a euphimism for the cerebral cortex. This is what my daughter has found as well. And that's not the only place it hides. Six months after she stopped using Meth, she began working out and it released those residual chemicals from her muscle tissues.

Unique
03-05-2008, 04:18 PM
I've had even more trouble sleeping and developed something close to restless leg syndrome.


I love to sleep. I'm one of those people who can sleep standing up. (Literally) Now sometimes I wake up every hour. Yesterday I woke up after 4 hours. (Down at midnight, up at 4 am) When Shwebbie took Raino for a mini vacation - one day I slept from 6 pm to 6 am! {Journalz I keepz 'em}

I'm much more sensitive to noise, much more sensitive to stress.

I don't think it's just you - it's an after effect.

And that's the bitch of it - the stuff does work but the big fat maybe what if's ... geez, louise.

And your brother - that agression is one of the side effects. Not in everyone. For me, there were "triggers". Well, one trigger really -

It always has and always will annoy me when someone says to me, 'Unique, you need to ....'

Tell me any other way and I'm cool with it. Tell me I 'need' to do anything and ordinarily I get annoyed. On this stuff ... well, let's just say I wasn't very nice to some of my very best friends. {SORRY VERY BEST FRIENDS}

Now the friend that told me, 'You might want to think about quitting that stuff....' got a calm, rational answer. The ones who told me I "needed" to ... got their heads ripped off. I remember that much.

Ol' Fashioned Girl
03-05-2008, 04:46 PM
:Hug2:47? Old enough for menopause? Absolutely.:Hug2:

Unique
03-05-2008, 04:51 PM
Yeah, OFG ... like standing on the edge and this stuff pushed me over. :)

Maybe.

Ha ha. They didn't know I can fly. :D

You see - I'm a biologist guys. I've studied this stuff. I don't have a Master's or a PhD but I'm not a turnip either -

But I had to say SOMETHING. How would I feel if something happened to Siddow and I hadn't said anything ... (?)

:cry::cry::cry::cry::cry:

It brings tears to my eyes thinking of it. I had to tell. I'd feel criminally negligent (among other things) if I hadn't.

That's why I keep calling all ya'll 'my beloveds'. Because you are. ((hugs))

Ol' Fashioned Girl
03-05-2008, 04:56 PM
That's one of the most amazing things about AW... we actually care about one another. Whether it's trying to help with a grammar question or helping get someone out of danger to a safe place: we care.

Oooo. I feel a group hug comin' on and I gotta get to gettin' ready for work! :D

Unique
03-05-2008, 05:22 PM
Anyhow, I'm planning to get off of it as quickly as possible. I've been on it two weeks, quit smoking five days ago, and only took .5mg today


Siddow - I'm coming back to this because as I said, I keep a journal. My first two weeks weren't a problem. It was ~ the third week that all hell broke loose. Let me check my calender ... <trots off>

On day 16, I felt myself kind of 'slipping'. I was still okay but that was ...
On or about day 22 or 23 ... it's really hard to say. My concept of time just vanished. A day was like a week was like an hour was like 5 mintues ago. But somewhere in there I went from 'Okay' to 'Seriously NOT Okay'


My natural concept of time is : Past, Now, Future. Only after I 'lost it', it was much, much worse. <shrug> what can I say? I know how I am. I know me. Better than anyone, 'ceptin' maybe God. ;)

But having said that ... even after all I went through - when I felt myself wanting to smoke again - I took it again - but *I* controlled the dosage this time. Yeppers. I did. (It worked, too)

Would I recommend that to anyone else? HELL NO.

My rationale was: I spent a whole lot of money that I couldn't really afford and I wanted my results, dammit.

And: I'd already been through HELL with this and I wanted my results, dammit.

And: Like I said - this is my field. When I was getting my pre-med degree, my intent was to go into PHARMACY. So - does that make it "right" to take chances? No, but it's my body and my mind to gamble with.

Sorry, kids. I'm honest. I've always been honest. And I've prayed for many years, 'Please, God. Make me UNABLE to lie.' I think He answered.

Gotta log off for a while (dial up days) Love's ya's!

Southern_girl29
03-05-2008, 07:16 PM
I love to sleep. I'm one of those people who can sleep standing up. (Literally) Now sometimes I wake up every hour. Yesterday I woke up after 4 hours. (Down at midnight, up at 4 am) When Shwebbie took Raino for a mini vacation - one day I slept from 6 pm to 6 am! {Journalz I keepz 'em}

I'm much more sensitive to noise, much more sensitive to stress.

I don't think it's just you - it's an after effect.

And that's the bitch of it - the stuff does work but the big fat maybe what if's ... geez, louise.

And your brother - that agression is one of the side effects. Not in everyone. For me, there were "triggers". Well, one trigger really -

It always has and always will annoy me when someone says to me, 'Unique, you need to ....'

Tell me any other way and I'm cool with it. Tell me I 'need' to do anything and ordinarily I get annoyed. On this stuff ... well, let's just say I wasn't very nice to some of my very best friends. {SORRY VERY BEST FRIENDS}

Now the friend that told me, 'You might want to think about quitting that stuff....' got a calm, rational answer. The ones who told me I "needed" to ... got their heads ripped off. I remember that much.

That's the way it was with my brother. Anything that might have annoyed him in the past set him off. My granny tended to get restless at night before she died and couldn't get comfortable. He was over there helping to take care of her and was moving her from her bed, to the couch, to her lift chair to the wheelchair, etc. He eventually just went off on her, and he really wouldn't have done that before, not to our granny. She could have asked him to carry her to the moon and back before, and he would have done it without saying a word.

He and his wife almost got a divorce after he started taking this, but they are working it out. He seems to be getting better, but it is taking a while.

I've never been a good sleeper, but it's always because I have trouble falling asleep. Now, I can't stay asleep, partly because of the muscle jerks and partly because I just wake up.

Siddow
03-05-2008, 08:01 PM
Irritability and restlessness are also symptoms of nicotine cessation. I was reading last night where a bunch of people were complaining about bowel obstruction and blaming it on Chantix...but smoking is a, um, relaxer, so when you quit smoking, you're going to get a little bound up and if you're not prepared for that, it can become a problem.

But thanks, Unique, for telling your story. I'd rather stay on the safe side and not take months of medication that I don't need. I'm over the worst part of the quit, think I'll just take it naturally from here. I've got four kids; I can't afford a lengthy crazy-time. :D

melaniehoo
03-05-2008, 08:23 PM
My sister didn't have quite as strong of a reaction as you, but she did have a lot of depression and anxiety problems while taking this med. She already had anxiety & panic attacks, so like some others said, it most likely increased the pre-existing conditions. She didn't take it for very long because, in her words, "It made her crazy."

I wish you luck Unique. Thank you for sharing your experience.

Jersey Chick
03-05-2008, 08:58 PM
I've tried to quit smoking 4 times. I was considering Chantix - but for everyone I've spoken to about it, they say it helped them quit but... and those buts are enough to steer me clear from it. I've got a kinda-short fuse to begin with, and considering that we're going through some things with my son (who's also in the midst of terrible twos to the extreme), it would be a bad, bad thing for me to take anything that might remotely make my fuse even shorter.

Unique, I'm glad you're back - :Hug2:

Mebbe I'll try the patch again. The other times, I'd gone months, but my husband smoked - which made quitting damn near impossible. He quit when he was hospitalized last summer - maybe it's time for me to give it another go...

Unique
03-05-2008, 09:13 PM
Irritability and restlessness are also symptoms of nicotine cessation....


Yeah. That's what p f i z e r ... tries to tell people. But this isn't snippy, snappy, growly ... this is more like when the tiger jumped over the wall and killed that boy. EXCESSIVE.


Instead of saying, 'Oh, F. U. and the horse you rode in on ... '

It's, 'Oh, F. U. and the horse you rode in on you *#&^$, #*&%#, #***&#^, ....', all the while you're pounding their face into the pavement. After you've bounced 'em off a few walls. And kicked 'em just for fun.

I'm really a Type B person. It takes A LOT to piss me off. And for me to get verbally violent (not threatening) but verbally violent... it's just not me.

I laugh about it but I'm always telling people, 'For me to get pissed off - first I have to care.' Because I'm am SO 'Yeah, well, whatever....' :D

Southerngirl, does this sound like you?:



1/21/08
"My sleep is often interrupted. I am startled awake every night - usually several times a night. Sometimes I'll be dreaming and I'll think, 'I have to remember that later!', and slam - I'm awake.

That might happen 5 or a dozen times a night. (or more) I just woke up like that a few minutes ago. But it's only 9:30 pm. I went to bed about 7:30 or 8. I was so exhausted. I still am."


That isn't what's going on with me right now. I'm not remembering any dreams at the moment. I'm just waking up a lot. I'm not going all the way down into delta sleep (or whatever - I can't remember things the way I'm supposed to either) :(

Sigh. It will go away. I'm going to make SURE it does if it takes me the rest of my natural life. Bet on it.

Shadow_Ferret
03-05-2008, 11:17 PM
Wow. They have drugs, dangerous drugs, to "help" you quit smoking?

What ever happened to just quitting cold turkey and toughing it out?

Cassiopeia
03-05-2008, 11:23 PM
I toughed it out. But then I hadn't been smoking except for six weeks in the UK. I haven't touched anything since December 9th and yeah, emotionally I still want them. But I can't say I understand long term addiction to cigarettes.

Siddow
03-06-2008, 12:09 AM
Instead of saying, 'Oh, F. U. and the horse you rode in on ... '

It's, 'Oh, F. U. and the horse you rode in on you *#&^$, #*&%#, #***&#^, ....', all the while you're pounding their face into the pavement. After you've bounced 'em off a few walls. And kicked 'em just for fun.



LOL, that's me cold-turkey! I had an attempted quit a few years ago. My DH, who has never smoked, ended up going out to buy me a pack when I threatened to skin him alive and put him on like a suit. He was like, "Please! Just have a cigarette! you're such an ass without them!" lol

I think they should re-market this stuff as a short-term crutch to get past those crucial first days. I haven't taken any Chantix today, and I don't have the urge to smoke. It's almost like us smokers who want to quit have two choices: crazy up front, or crazy down the road.

Cassiopeia
03-06-2008, 12:13 AM
Lucky you. I'm just crazy all the time. :D

Southern_girl29
03-06-2008, 12:46 AM
What you mentioned up thread is exactly what happens to me. Sometimes, I'll even be half asleep and my muscles will jerk. I can't wake up but I can't stop the jerking movements either. It's really weird. I have seen my doctor about it, but to tell the truth, I hadn't really connected those symptoms with the Chantix.

John Paton
03-06-2008, 01:04 AM
I've tried to quit smoking 4 times. I was considering Chantix ...... Mebbe I'll try the patch again ...... maybe it's time for me to give it another go...

Karen Duvall mentioned Zyban earlier in the thread.

I have given up for 2 and a half years after using zyban. This after smoking 25 cigs a day for 30 years and trying EVERY method known to man (apart from Chantix that is)

I implore anyone smoking to give it up - it will kill you prematurely. I also ask you to consider zyban.

Although zyban also has side effects which should be thoroughly researched I do not believe the side effects are as dangerous as they appear to be with Chantix.

Thank you for sharing your story unique and you are in our prayers for a full recovery.

Cassiopeia
03-06-2008, 01:20 AM
For those who may not know zyban is also prescribed as Wellbutren. It is used an anti-depressant that works on the dopamine levels instead of serotonine levels.

Jersey Chick
03-06-2008, 01:23 AM
I did okay on the patch the last go-round. I think the problem was quitting while living with someone who smoked. That's what make me crack. I think.

Never say never. Some day I'll get it right. :)

Shadow_Ferret
03-06-2008, 01:29 AM
This after smoking 25 cigs a day for 30 years Pfft. Amateur.

I smoked 2 packs a day normally. If I went out to drink, I'd smoke 2 packs in a night! And I drank a lot in those days.

Angie
03-06-2008, 02:08 AM
A woman I used to work with started taking Chantix. She wasn't exactly a stable person before, but after she started taking it she went insane. Started drinking like a fish. Took a swing at our new manager. Became a deadly, snarling beast. Quit her job in a fit of rage over the boss asking her if everything was okay.

According to another coworker who knows this woman outside of work, she has since stopped taking Chantix and is starting to get back to what, for her, is normal. But watching what it did to her made me tell my sister (who is considering quit-smoking alternatives) to be very, very careful. This stuff can be scary. O.o

**Note: Another coworker tried the stuff at the same time, and did not have any reaction to it at all. Of course, she also didn't quit smoking, so I'm not sure if she was actually taking it as directed...

Unique
03-06-2008, 03:55 AM
The reason I started Chantix in the first place is because I was hearing all these other people say they'd tried this, tried that, tried the other thing and none of them worked.

Well - I'd tried all the other things, too. They didn't work for me either. So I figured, why not? And it did work.


Why not cold turkey, Shadow Ferret? Because it wouldn't have happened, that's why. If I were going to have quit that way - I would have done it by now. The motivation to quit just wasn't high enough. <shrug> What can I say? That's me.

John Paton
03-06-2008, 04:25 AM
Why not cold turkey, Shadow Ferret? Because it wouldn't have happened, that's why. If I were going to have quit that way - I would have done it by now. The motivation to quit just wasn't high enough.

Cold turkey wouldn't have worked for me either.

I do not think it is a motivation thing here. The craving to smoke is extreme in some people. No when I say extreme then that is underplaying the feeling you have. If you haven't experienced it you cannot imagine it - it transcends everything else.

This is not an excuse but when you try Cold Turkey and the overwhelming feelings of withdrawal are with you constantly day and night for weeks and weeks on end - and one little drag on one little cigarette will make these cravings disappear and you'll feel great - you can understand what some people go through.

I admire people who can give up cigarettes Cold Turkey but it is not a sign of weakness for those who cannot. The withdrawal symptons are just too extreme!!

WerenCole
03-06-2008, 07:34 AM
What is the anti-depression drug that is supposed to help with quiting? The doctor wouldn't prescribe it to me because of my drinking habits, oh well. ETA: Welbutrin. . . that is it. . (sorry, didn't read whole thread first)

Chantix is a nicotine inhibitor right? I was prescribed that once but it was too expensive (really though, cigarettes are expensive. . . I am just kidding myself)

Unique
03-06-2008, 04:54 PM
It was expensive for me, too, Weren. I used my home equity line of credit to buy it. (!)

That's why I wanted my results, dammit. :D

I did the math and it will pretty much pay for itself in 6 months or less (except the interest on the note) :(

But anyway - I had 5 or 6 reasons for wanting to quit; I got 'one more' this summer and I figured I'd try it. I know it's still affecting me because when I think, 'if you knew then what you know now, would you still use it?' and the answer is a definite ---- maybe shading toward yes. :D

I'll tell you what, though. If I had known the dangers, I would have self adjusted the dose waaaaay before launch.

jdkiggins
03-07-2008, 05:18 AM
I'm really glad you shared this. Even happier you made it through this ordeal.

By the way...my head is in fairly good shape. :D ((HUGS)) my friend.

Unique
03-07-2008, 05:41 PM
No. I read a cartload of research.

This is Chantix.

And it's fucked, majorly. People have committed suicide because of the side effects; the detox can take eighteen months to two years, because residual chemicals reside in fatty tissues.

"Fatty tissues," btw is often a euphimism for the cerebral cortex.

Thanks, Joanne.

You, Mac, Medievalist, and Shwebb were really there for me. I appreciate it more than you'll ever know. (If I missed anyone - blame my broken brain. :tongue )

Kevin - twice I've had that bipolar thing happen to me. Both times were chemically induced by prescription drugs.

I am very wary when any doctor gives me anything besides peniciliin. :D
And that's not hyperbole - that's a FACT. I have a canary in the coal mine body.

Medi - if you have any of those web sites in your history, can you shoot them to me?

I think it is starting to come out of my body because I'm wanting cigarettes again. (*&^%$) A Catch-22 I wouldn't wish on anyone.

Shadow_Ferret
03-07-2008, 06:43 PM
Why not cold turkey, Shadow Ferret? Because it wouldn't have happened, that's why. If I were going to have quit that way - I would have done it by now. The motivation to quit just wasn't high enough. <shrug> What can I say? That's me.
Well, I can certainly see how being concerned about your health, worrying about getting cancer, or emphesema, or other lung diseases, how spending hundreds of dollars on the habit, how always smelling of cigarettes, how having bad breath and brown teeth, how being forced to smoke outside no matter what the weather, how none of that could act as a motivation to quit.

:rolleyes:

I don't know. Seems like it was enough motivation to get you to try a deadly drug.

Cranky
03-07-2008, 07:25 PM
Well, I can certainly see how being concerned about your health, worrying about getting cancer, or emphesema, or other lung diseases, how spending hundreds of dollars on the habit, how always smelling of cigarettes, how having bad breath and brown teeth, how being forced to smoke outside no matter what the weather, how none of that could act as a motivation to quit.

:rolleyes:

I don't know. Seems like it was enough motivation to get you to try a deadly drug.

Isn't it the end result here that matters? I mean, c'mon, really...

Cassiopeia
03-07-2008, 08:43 PM
Well, I can certainly see how being concerned about your health, worrying about getting cancer, or emphesema, or other lung diseases, how spending hundreds of dollars on the habit, how always smelling of cigarettes, how having bad breath and brown teeth, how being forced to smoke outside no matter what the weather, how none of that could act as a motivation to quit.

:rolleyes:

I don't know. Seems like it was enough motivation to get you to try a deadly drug.I realize you don't understand what Unique and others go through. You'd think it was that simple wouldn't you? But what she is dealing with is the nature of true addiction. Not everyone who smokes cigarettes has this much trouble quitting but that doesn't invalidate her difficulty with it.

For example: One is called upon to contemplate the alcoholic who after 20 years of drinking could one day decided to quit drinking and smoking. Who placed a six pack of beer and a carton of cigarettes on the top shelf in his closet and never touched either of them again.

This is not a common example of how it is. I come from a long line of alcoholics and smokers. The man I described was my mother's brother, my Uncle Sonny. Neither my mother or her sister ever touched alcohol but her mother and all the aunts and uncles on that side of the family were alcoholics who tried for years to walk away from it. They just couldn't.

But why my uncle? How did he manage to do that? I have two brothers who were both smokers and alcoholics. They gave up the cigarettes but not the booze. I don't drink much. It holds no enjoyment for me. I smoked for six weeks while in the UK and when I left there on December 10th. I haven't had another one. Do I want one? Still? You bet I do. Most certainly. It's not easy and I can't explain how I can just stop.

My daughter however, offered this explanation from her experiences in rehab. For some, addiction can be an all or nothing situation. Which on one hand makes it easy to quit or on the other hand a very difficult one.

I'd like to finish my comments by saying that perhaps it might help you to relate this to the example of our society today. We all know it's bad for us to eat out a lot or to eat the wrong foods and that being overweight is not healthy for us. So then why do we have such a high population of overweight people in the world. We know better. Why then can't we just simply do what we need to, to be thin and healthy and be done with it?

Because addiction isn't that simple. Our lifestyles are promoting much of what ails us.

I for one hold ANYONE in the highest of esteem, who works hard at handling their addiction no matter what approach you take to do it. Whether it's cigarettes, drugs, alcohol, overeating/under eating, compulsive shopping, compulsive sex, and even compulsive drama; it takes a lot to manage our lives and work with how our body and brain chemistry works.

To those who suffer from addiction no matter what your 'drug of choice' is (even this forum or other online activities can become a problem if not kept in perspective), please know that you are not alone and that you can do this.

Don't be discouraged. You'll find the answers, of this I'm certain.

writerterri
03-07-2008, 09:08 PM
Sounds like a devil drug and they really need to take it off the market. Any drug that works on the brain like that is dangerous.

Cold turkey is what worked for me. Anyone who tells themselves they can't quit without "something" is coping out. Yeah it's tough and takes strong will but it can be done. One just has to make up their mind that this is what they're going to do and do it.

Unique! Dork.

I do hope you feel better soon. Being mental sucks! I know. :D

Cassiopeia
03-07-2008, 09:16 PM
Sounds like a devil drug and they really need to take it off the market. Any drug that works on the brain like that is dangerous.

Cold turkey is what worked for me. Anyone who tells themselves they can't quit without "something" is coping out. Yeah it's tough and takes strong will but it can be done. One just has to make up their mind that this is what they're going to do and do it.

Unique! Dork.

I do hope you feel better soon. Being mental sucks! I know. :DI'm glad you could do it that way. I did as well but I do not agree with you that others who need help quitting are coping out. We are all very different with different challenges.

Siddow
03-07-2008, 09:43 PM
I couldn't quit cold turkey. I tried, but it only brought out my homicidal tendencies.

But I did quit pain killers and cocaine, cold turkey, no problem. Go figure.

writerterri
03-07-2008, 09:59 PM
I'm glad you could do it that way. I did as well but I do not agree with you that others who need help quitting are coping out. We are all very different with different challenges.


We can agree to disagree. Dork. :D

Here's what I went on. All of the people I talked to who quit smoking and there is a lot, said that after dealing with patches and pills and what nots, ended up going back to the tobacco and said they just had to make up their mind to quit cold turkey.

Now my mom, who was a pill addict, took an antidepressant to quit. But I forgot the name. She said it worked but did end up smoking again due to stress. She has quit cold turkey as well. But she was in a strong state of mind.

The drugs in tobacco create receptors in the brain that become addicted to the chemicals at great length and when the drug becomes low the receptors become agitated signaling the smoker to have another cigarette. The more you smoke the more your brain tells you to take in. Now, when a person wants to quit, of course they want an easier way to do it as to not suffer from the agitaiton. That's where drugs come into play and other remedies but at the cost of side effects, nevertheless, needlessly. Some people find ways to reduce the number of receptors in their brain that make them want to smoke naturally or you can go chemically. It's a choice. You can choose to handle the suffering you put upon yourself or find an easy way out.

I chose to suffer for a few days until the number of receptors reduced. I also did a few natural things to ease my mental state of mind by going through the motions of smoking. I feel that if people would educate themselves about what's happening to their brain while quitting they could be more equipped to refuse the poisons in tobacco and brain altering drugs. Our brains are very complex and if people knew what they were doing to it by taking drugs to put the receptors at ease while quiting and suffering unnatural side effects, I'm pretty sure they would put the pills away.

Suffering natural side effects of quitting smoking is better than ending up dead.

Wouldn't you rather quit in a natural way? Sure there's suffering, but you're not altering your brain and for some permanently.

It's a matter of will if you ask me. We are, after all, talking about cigarettes.

People just don't want to step out of their comfort zone and suffer for a while. In America suffering and sadness is a bad thing.

So let's kill ourselves with pills! :Shrug:

"I did this to myself and now I have to quit but I don't want to suffer."

Poor baby. :cry:


Glad you chose to quit Unique! It's tough but you can do it!

I think I'll sell this article.

Written by

Terri Wiesemeyer

Cassiopeia
03-07-2008, 10:58 PM
Even taking a pill to stop smoking or to withdraw from heroine or meth requires a decision and the will and determination to do it.

My daughter went cold turkey from meth as well, that doesn't however mean everyone can do it.

Unique
03-07-2008, 11:57 PM
Sounds like a devil drug and they really need to take it off the market. Any drug that works on the brain like that is dangerous.

Cold turkey is what worked for me. Anyone who tells themselves they can't quit without "something" is coping out. Yeah it's tough and takes strong will but it can be done. One just has to make up their mind that this is what they're going to do and do it.

Unique! Dork.

I do hope you feel better soon. Being mental sucks! I know. :D

And that's what I'm afraid of - that it WILL come off the market. It WORKS, dammitol! But it can't be passed out like candy - prescription or not!

I really do resent the 'copping out' terri. You're not me and you don't live inside me or run my brain. You're entitled to your opinion (like the rest of us) but I disagree with you 1200%. <<<i'm leaving that typo. {dorki}:tongue

That's what I was trying to tell the company. Once you hit a certain level - micro doses. You don't need mg. you need mcg. (!!)

I don't know why I can't quit w/o help. The only way I ever managed before was when I dated a guy that didn't smoke and I didn't want to kiss him with a dirty mouth. Go figure. {and it wasn't easy either ... but I was in luurrve...}

Yeah, Shadow ... I'm following all what you're saying and I don't know why that isn't motivation enough for me. My best friend died from emphysema. I watched her suffer. It still wasn't enough.

It's definitely in my brain somehow. Crabby, suffering, shakes... nope. Not a bit. Just two halves of my brain at war with one another and the 'don't quit' side always won out over the 'quit' side. You could probably find some self-destructive tendency rooted in childhood if you looked hard enough - who knows?

The stuff works and it works well. The drug companies need to fine tune it and quit using us as unpaid guinea pigs. (!!) And quit choosing 100% Grade A best perfect specimens of humanity. Most of us aren't like that. (!!)

And a lot of drugs 'work on the brain' Thyroid hormone, pituitary hormone, estrogen, testosterone... all those types do. They replace what isn't there naturally or what isn't there in the amounts it should be there.

I don't know, but I suspect that the mode of action for this works in somewhat the same way. I don't think it's working the way they think it does. I really don't.

Logic says if it were binding to nicotine receptors, then the patch and the gum would have worked for me as well because the nicotine in them should be binding to the same receptors. Well, neither one of those did a darn thing for me. Nothing, nada, zip, zilch, fugeddabout it.
Something should have happened - if only a decrease in desire. But it didn't happen.

Is there a flaw in that logic anyone else can see?

Siddow
03-08-2008, 12:13 AM
I never tried a patch or gum, because my main plan of attack was to break the addiction to nicotine, not to find a nicotine replacement.

I'm all with you, Unique, that the dosage is wrong. Once I went up to the two 1mg pills a day, I felt different. Even taking 1 1mg pill a day was...odd. But a .5 mg? No problem, and no urge to smoke, and when I did smoke, it did nothing for me.

I haven't taken any in three days now, and I can feel the urge to smoke coming back in bits, but I know I'm over the physical withdrawal so I'm good. It's not a "damn, I want a smoke." It's more like, "a smoke sounds good, but you know it would suck putty balls, so why bother?"

Unique
03-08-2008, 12:16 AM
Yes, Siddow - that's what I mean. I had finally gotten to a point where that little >flick< of a thought of smoking one had vanished.

Then a great walloping gob of super stress attacked me and I'm wanting (and doing) again. Dammit. Dammit. Dammit.

So I'm double fighting myself again. (!) Do it, don't do it...re: smoking. Do it, don't do it....re: Devil Drug.

sigh. Just when you think it's safe to go back in the water ......

Siddow
03-08-2008, 12:27 AM
Unique, you need to find another instant de-stressor. I like acupressure on my hands, feet if I'm barefoot. Just a thumb and index finger pressing the space between my other thumb/index finger helps.

Unique
03-08-2008, 05:03 AM
I'll try that. It sounds less painful than pulling my hair out.

Medievalist
03-08-2008, 11:29 AM
You know, a dear much-loved friend of mine is trying to quit smoking after, oh, twenty years or so of smoking, and a childhood spent around smokers.

Don't think about quitting. Really. Don't.

But think about cutting down. Switch to a brand with less tar/nicotine.

Try to smoke one less a week, even. Then one less a day.

Find something to do instead of smoking, something to do to take up the ritual space left empty when you smoke less--something that's enjoyable, and harmless.

Another friend umm... well.

She bought a vibrator :D.

She doesn't smoke at all, now. I haven't asked about battery consumption...

Unique
03-08-2008, 05:51 PM
Find something to do instead of smoking, something to do to take up the ritual space left empty when you smoke less--something that's enjoyable, and harmless


It's funny you should mention that - when I was in college, I could go all day without even thinking about a cigarette. I think I smoked 2 on campus in 4 years.

But the minute my foot was off campus property and I was headed for the car ... oh, boy did I want one! That's when I tried the patch. Nope. Didn't work. I didn't want to give myself a heart attack so I pulled it off. It was a bummer - darn things cost me 50 bucks!

I think it's too much of a reward and a procrastination tool for me. That's part of it. I should be well away from the physical addiction/craving part. It's great fun psychoanalyzing myself.

Not.

sunna
03-08-2008, 06:58 PM
I became a gum-chewing freak when I went cold turkey; especially in the car. There's something about being behind the wheel that makes me want to smoke all the time. So I had (and have) about 4 packs of gum on me at all times now. As for the reward part, I decided this time to go on a diet at the same time that I quit...so for every day that I made it without smoking, I got one lindt truffle at the end of the day.

Sounds kind of pathetic when I write it out, but hey, it worked.


She bought a vibrator :D.

She doesn't smoke at all, now. I haven't asked about battery consumption...

Well, that beats a chocolate truffle. :tongue Although I doubt I could have replaced my mid-morning, lunch time and mid-afternoon smoke breaks at work with that...

Sean D. Schaffer
03-08-2008, 08:37 PM
Even taking a pill to stop smoking or to withdraw from heroine or meth requires a decision and the will and determination to do it.

My daughter went cold turkey from meth as well, that doesn't however mean everyone can do it.


I have a friend who has to get up every morning and dose at a local Methadone clinic. It's neither easy, nor a cop-out. She knows that if she does not do this, her heroine withdrawals will eventually kill her.

I think it's admirable that someone can quit something cold-turkey, but I also know from experience that it's not always possible.

Also, my step-dad stopped smoking three packs of Vantage full-flavors every day, cold turkey. After that, his abusive ways toward me intensified immensely. Had he had a 'cop-out method', he might have mellowed out a lot more quickly and I would not have ended up hating him for the last fifteen years or so.

So basically, there is good reason, in many cases, to quit smoking or doing some drug medically. It's not always a cop-out. There are situations that require medical intervention, or at least could benefit from it.

writerterri
03-10-2008, 10:39 PM
Okay I was being a butt head! But Only because of the data I collected.

What I said was solely my opinion. As far as feelings go, I'm sorry. Really I am. I should know better to be strong willed. It doesn't work! It doesn't keep the peace and I'm a peace keeper.

Someone hug me. :D

Unique
03-11-2008, 03:35 AM
:whip:Take That!
Oh. Hug. I thought you said 'Mug':Hug2:


:e2tongue:neener, neener....