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Sarita
03-05-2008, 05:07 AM
Hiya kids!

I'm looking for the appropriate words for "Guidance Counselor." Any ideas? I can figure out a literal translation, but I'm not sure I'm capturing the essence of the job.

Any ideas, students? Any help would be appreciated. :)

Sara

robeiae
03-05-2008, 05:11 AM
Raul Castro?

Sarita
03-05-2008, 05:13 AM
Next, I'm making the entire class recite French, Rob. Run while you can.

CasualObserver
03-05-2008, 05:16 AM
I have it straight from the source that there is no direct translation. Generally, English words with modern origins aren't translated, they're simply used as is. Eg; "Yo voy a mida guidance counselor."

There are many Spanish dialects though. That's how a Spanish-speaker from Texas would say it, according to a Spanish-speaker from Texas.

robeiae
03-05-2008, 05:21 AM
I have it straight from the source that there is no direct translation. Generally, English words with modern origins aren't translated, they're simply used as is. Eg; "Yo voy a mida guidance counselor."
I've noticed there is no Spanish equivalent for "permanent wave," as well.

(I hang out in Little Havana hair salons)

maxmordon
03-05-2008, 05:30 AM
Hiya kids!

I'm looking for the appropriate words for "Guidance Counselor." Any ideas? I can figure out a literal translation, but I'm not sure I'm capturing the essence of the job.

Any ideas, students? Any help would be appreciated. :)

Sara

Consejero escolar, Orientador, etc. In films is almost always translated as Consejero Escolar

maxmordon
03-05-2008, 05:32 AM
I've noticed there is no Spanish equivalent for "permanent wave," as well.

(I hang out in Little Havana hair salons)

Do you mean hair? that is commonly called as La Permanente

Sarita
03-06-2008, 05:48 AM
Max! You are awesome. A total life saver. :) Thank you so much.

Can you answer one more for me? Grade point average is usually referred to as GPA in English. In Spanish, is there an acronym or is it just something like grado medio? Maybe PGM?

robeiae
03-06-2008, 06:10 AM
Do you mean hair? that is commonly called as La Permanente
That's another name for Fidel Castro.

Sheesz.

Voyager
03-06-2008, 06:23 AM
When I was in school he was ese bastardo que siempre me anda diciendo cuales clases debo de tomar.

maxmordon
03-06-2008, 10:05 PM
I think you mean Promedio de Notas. And I doubt there is an Acronym for it, if there is I haven't heard it

C.bronco
03-06-2008, 10:09 PM
Cool! I'm a Consejero Escolar! I feel very exotic.

Consejero Escolar! Con-se-je-ro Es-co-LAR! Sing it with me!

Voyager
03-06-2008, 10:10 PM
ConsejerA, CB. Unless there's something you want to tell us :D

C.bronco
03-06-2008, 10:13 PM
oh yeah, I get a do-over:

Consejera Escolar! Con-se-je-RA Es-co-LAR!!!!!
Big Finish!
:thankyou:

oneblindmouse
03-06-2008, 10:53 PM
I have it straight from the source that there is no direct translation. Generally, English words with modern origins aren't translated, they're simply used as is. Eg; "Yo voy a mida guidance counselor."

There are many Spanish dialects though. That's how a Spanish-speaker from Texas would say it, according to a Spanish-speaker from Texas.

First, whoever your "source" is, he or she does not speak correct Spanish. Saying that "words with modern origins aren't translated" is a load of ......er.... nonsense! Your "source" either doesn't know or can't be bothered.
Second, by 'mida' he/she means "mi" - Spanish for "my".
Third, a "guidance councellor" (presumably referring to some sort of school counsellor) can be translated as "asesor/a o consejero/a escolar" or "psicólogo/a" or "asistente social". (A councillor in local government is a "concejal/a").

Sarita
03-06-2008, 11:02 PM
First, whoever your "source" is, he or she does not speak correct Spanish. Saying that "words with modern origins aren't translated" is a load of ......er.... nonsense! Your "source" either doesn't know or can't be bothered.
Second, by 'mida' he/she means "mi" - Spanish for "my".
Third, a "guidance councellor" (presumably referring to some sort of school counsellor) can be translated as "asesor/a o consejero/a escolar" or "psicólogo/a" or "asistente social". (A councillor in local government is a "concejal/a").
Yeah, I'm working on a study for a college that is going to be polling guidance counselors in Panama. I'm thinking they won't be using bastardized phrasing.

Thanks for all the responses! You guys really help a girl out :)

Voyager
03-06-2008, 11:04 PM
oh yeah, I get a do-over:

Consejera Escolar! Con-se-je-RA Es-co-LAR!!!!!
Big Finish!
:thankyou:
You're so priddy

maxmordon
03-06-2008, 11:06 PM
Yeah, I'm working on a study for a college that is going to be polling guidance counselors in Panama. I'm thinking they won't be using bastardized phrasing.

Thanks for all the responses! You guys really help a girl out :)

You're welcome! when you need help, you know where I am... :)

Voyager
03-06-2008, 11:06 PM
You're welcome! when you need help, you know where I am... :)

And if he can't help you, he can get Presidente Chespirito to give a hand.