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StephanieFox
03-05-2008, 04:14 AM
From CNN:

Ordinarily, octopodes have eight arms and legs. And should they lose one or more in an accident, they can grow the limbs back.
Which is what makes 'Henry' -- as staffers at Blackpool Sea Life Centre in northwest England have dubbed their find -- so unique.
His missing limbs stem from a birth defect.
"If you look closer between the legs, there's webbing that attaches each of the arms together," John Filmer of the Sea Life Centre told CNN Tuesday. "You'd assume if he'd lost one of his legs in an accident, there would be space for an arm to grow back.
"But there's no space for two extra legs to grow back. That's just how he is."



So, is a six-legged octopus still an octopus, or is it a hexapus?



I didn't know where else to post this. Hope it's ok to post here.

ColoradoGuy
03-05-2008, 05:16 AM
Octopus, I'd say, albeit a limb-challenged one. I take the word to describe the species, even if a particular example is deformed. A cow without a leg remains a member of a species of quadrapeds.

robeiae
03-05-2008, 05:18 AM
It's still an octopus, but it's not an octopod.

DeaconBlu
03-05-2008, 06:20 AM
limb-challenged LOL, that's good, I'd go with that one.

maestrowork
03-05-2008, 06:56 AM
What is an Octopussy?

veinglory
03-05-2008, 07:32 AM
http://www.sp3ccylad.com/gallery/albums/MashAn1/octopussy.jpg

http://www.weirdspot.com/images/uploads/octopussy.jpg

Ruv Draba
03-05-2008, 12:44 PM
Octopus, I'd say, albeit a limb-challenged one. I take the word to describe the species, even if a particular example is deformed. A cow without a leg remains a member of a species of quadrapeds.
So true. And similarly, a vegetarian ant-eater would still be called the same...

And I bet that ticks them off, too: "Don't label me for the atrocities of my race!!"

Dawnstorm
03-05-2008, 07:17 PM
albino blackbird (http://www.iomtoday.co.im/news/Albino-blackbird-spotted-feeding-at.3526611.jp)

http://editorial.jpress.co.uk/web/Upload/IOM//TH1_2711200718AlbinoBlackbird.jpg

Higgins
03-05-2008, 08:52 PM
albino blackbird (http://www.iomtoday.co.im/news/Albino-blackbird-spotted-feeding-at.3526611.jp)

http://editorial.jpress.co.uk/web/Upload/IOM//TH1_2711200718AlbinoBlackbird.jpg

Is the haploid state of some moss the whole moss or just part of the moss?

Dawnstorm
03-05-2008, 09:40 PM
Is the haploid state of some moss the whole moss or just part of the moss?

A question of taxonomy?

Higgins
03-05-2008, 10:15 PM
A question of taxonomy?

Good Question. Even using the best cladistic methods, it seems there is some controversy about the mosses:

http://www.tolweb.org/Bryophyta

http://ethesis.helsinki.fi/julkaisut/bio/bioja/vk/huttunen/phylogen.pdf

http://www.amjbot.org/cgi/content/full/91/5/748

Somehow, Sinikka ended
up (probably even too often) listening to everyone’s worries at the cryptogamic herbarium.

dgiharris
03-07-2008, 08:32 PM
WHat if his birth defect is actually a genetic mutation?

If he finds a lucky lady (Octopussy?) and decides to settle down and have kids. If those kids in turn have six limbs, then I say he is no longer an octopus. He is a new bread.

A hexapus.

But, if he has kids and they pop out with eight limbs, then he is a limbed-challenged octopus.

that is my 2 cents.

Mel...

Higgins
03-07-2008, 09:20 PM
WHat if his birth defect is actually a genetic mutation?

If he finds a lucky lady (Octopussy?) and decides to settle down and have kids. If those kids in turn have six limbs, then I say he is no longer an octopus. He is a new bread.

A hexapus.

But, if he has kids and they pop out with eight limbs, then he is a limbed-challenged octopus.

that is my 2 cents.

Mel...

What if...like a good hexpus, he leaves his sperm packet to science and crawls off to die and the packet is frozen and we just never know whether he was quite yet the father of all hexpussies???

Dawnstorm
03-08-2008, 01:09 AM
And what if said hexapus would have everything else in common with mommy's species? Would we expand and shift the order of octopoda to include this one six-legged species? Would we classify it as a different species at all, since - presumably - six-legs could easily breed with eight-legs - and - assuming the mutation survives - we would have a single species of octopus that could have six-legs? Or what if the six-leg variety isn't a genetic variation at all?

I think I'll write a SF piece about Bonsai octopoda and animal rights activists.

StephanieFox
03-17-2008, 04:22 AM
I really hope that the folks with this creature do breed him or her so they can find out what's goin' on. It would be fun for them to create a new species without going in and messin' with the genes. I guess after that, we could talk about what to name the new animal.

Khazarkhum
03-18-2008, 11:51 AM
I really hope that the folks with this creature do breed him or her so they can find out what's goin' on. It would be fun for them to create a new species without going in and messin' with the genes. I guess after that, we could talk about what to name the new animal.

Deliberately breeding for a specific trait is, by definition, messin' with the genes.

StephanieFox
03-19-2008, 03:28 AM
Leave the octogirl and boy alone together with a dinner of oysters and a little Barry White on the hi-fi and let nature take it's course.

jbryson
04-21-2008, 02:15 PM
[QUOTE=StephanieFox;2122203]From CNN:



So, is a six-legged octopus still an octopus, or is it a hexapus?

Nah, he's an insect.

yaxkin
07-21-2008, 12:14 AM
Just A Thought

A Deconstruction of your question would suggest that there exists a first principle desire to validate the modernist ideology that underlies science. I have no interest in doing so. Instead, I suggest you call the creature... Gato Loco.

I tend to think that we spend too much of our existence trying to get things right rather than simply appreciating things for what they are. You don't really believe that we exist in a world where such a concern as how to properly classify this creature should exist outside of a scientific blog, do you? Wouldn't you rather play a nice game of Chess?

Higgins
07-21-2008, 06:10 PM
Just A Thought

A Deconstruction of your question would suggest that there exists a first principle desire to validate the modernist ideology that underlies science.

I don't know. Maybe on this one you can just skip deconstructing and go
straight to Freud for all the marbles: possible "Loss" of octopus arm = castration anxiety. But the article says "that's just the way he is"...so the anxiety is brought up and then to some degree made into an safe and "natural" topic. Indeed, a "philosophical" topic.

smoothseas
07-21-2008, 08:51 PM
Our niece teaches third grade. Last spring her class took a field trip to the zoo. Their homework assignment for that evening was to produce a paragraph about which animal they'd like to be and why.

Josh wrote that he wanted to be an octopus. Why? So he could have eight testicles.

She said that the teacher's lounge was in stitches all that afternoon at lunch.

Danger Jane
07-22-2008, 03:22 AM
WHat if his birth defect is actually a genetic mutation?

If he finds a lucky lady (Octopussy?) and decides to settle down and have kids. If those kids in turn have six limbs, then I say he is no longer an octopus. He is a new bread.

A hexapus.

But, if he has kids and they pop out with eight limbs, then he is a limbed-challenged octopus.

that is my 2 cents.

Mel...

If he's a new species, he wouldn't be able to breed with a female octopus. Sounds like a mixup of HOX genes to me? And humans born with many limbs are still human.