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KarlaErikaCal
02-29-2008, 11:12 PM
I was on Yahoo Answers today and I asked "What are the benefits and disadvantages of having a double major?"
Then I went on to say, I want to have a BA in English and Communication, then have an MA in Creative Writing
This one person said:

"I'm going to be a little brutal here. An MA in English isn't worth much. English majors are at the bottom every year of college graduate average salaries, and Comm isn't much better. I'd go so far as to say those are the two "most worthless" college majors.

If you get an MA in English, you are going to be teaching high school, forever. There are a plethora of English majors with MA's and pHDs and they cannot get good jobs. Why? Because there are so many of them, and the practical experience of their learning is good for... teaching high school. The days of copy writing/traditional print advertising are dwindling.

I got a B.A. from the University of California in a similarly worthless field (political science), and it has been an equally worthless degree to me. I now work in a field that is completely unrelated to my major.

I would think about what you really want to do with your college degree, and think about what will actually earn you some money when you graduate so you can pay off those loans! I wish somebody had came to me and kicked me in the *** when I was doing poli sci "because it was interesting." That didn't get me anywhere in the job. I hated math, and I hate science, but if I could do it all over again, I would have done engineering as my major. Just something to think about..."

First of all.... not every English major goes on to teach. I've looked at a college site (I forgot which college it was) and most of their English majors didn't even pursue English careers at all. Some just take it so they can communicate better, that's what my reason would be at least (and the fact that I want to be an author).

What I don't understand is why diss on something others choose if it has nothing to do with you? Sure it is their opinion, but that person didn't even answer my question. I gave him or her a thumbs down. :rant:

This other girl told me that maybe I can major in English but have a concentration in communication, creative writing, or education. This answer I really liked because I didn't know about that.

But yeah, I felt like ranting, like I did on yahoo answers too about constructive criticism last summer. But hey, at least someone refered me to AW as a result.

This concludes my rant. I have officially calmed down now. Writing (well typing) things down gets a whole lot off of my chest/shoulders/back, whatever you get my point :D

bluntforcetrauma
02-29-2008, 11:16 PM
KC;
When you throw out a question to the snake pit, sometimes a viper strikes. There are always gonna be snooty a**holes. Give 'em the finger and rock on.

Rick

III
02-29-2008, 11:16 PM
The moral of the story - don't look for answers anywhere other than AW. Personally I think you should drop out of school and become a professional ninja. I think that would be a fun occupation. And also sell Amway products by day to subsidize your ninja business until it gets off the ground.

bluntforcetrauma
02-29-2008, 11:17 PM
The moral of the story - don't look for answers anywhere other than AW. Personally I think you should drop out of school and become a professional ninja. I think that would be a fun occupation. And also sell Amway products by day to subsidize your ninja business until it gets off the ground.

You're a genius!

Unique
02-29-2008, 11:19 PM
JMHO (of course)



at least someone refered me to AW as a result.




That's one of the nicest things anyone has ever done for you even if you don't know it yet. :)

Why do people diss like that? Well, from hanging out here one thing I've learned is >>>> Sometimes it isn't WHAT you say as much as HOW you say it.

That person could have said the exact same thing but in a different manner and it wouldn't have bothered you a bit.

I have a degree in biology - that and five bucks might get me coffee at Starbucks.

What do you want your degree to do for you? Plumbers and electricians make big bucks and they don't usually get a degree at all. :Shrug:Go figure.

Motivation counts for a lot. As a matter of fact, IMO, ambition, motivation, and desire count for more than any and/or every degree you can get.

/soapbox off/

Good luck. Do what makes you happy. Don't let anyone steal your joy.
>''<

sassandgroove
02-29-2008, 11:32 PM
I majored in Cinematography. I work in a design firm as an Office Admin and I am writing a novel.

When I was in school, and deciding whether I should finish that major or drop out, go to a diff school to change majors, which would take as many years as I had already been in school my boss at the time said something that helped a lot. It isn't so much what you major in but that you finish. He said it shows that you follow through. I finished my degree in cinema and I am glad.

KarlaErikaCal
02-29-2008, 11:38 PM
The moral of the story - don't look for answers anywhere other than AW. Personally I think you should drop out of school and become a professional ninja. I think that would be a fun occupation. And also sell Amway products by day to subsidize your ninja business until it gets off the ground.

Yupp AW is the place to be. I should have learned my lesson from the question that caused me to rant about constructive criticism last summer. But whatever, no more going on Y! Answers.
And no ninja business for me. But that made me smile


That's one of the nicest things anyone has ever done for you even if you don't know it yet. :)

I have known it. I absolutely freaking LOVE this site!! :D


Why do people diss like that? Well, from hanging out here one thing I've learned is >>>> Sometimes it isn't WHAT you say as much as HOW you say it.

That person could have said the exact same thing but in a different manner and it wouldn't have bothered you a bit.

True that. This is what I love about this site. People offer such helpful tips and encouraging words. I LOVE YA GUYS! :hooray:

KarlaErikaCal
02-29-2008, 11:46 PM
The ironic thing about taking English as my major is that I do horrible in my high school english classes. Freshman year- 1st sem of Sophomore year I got B's. It was only 2nd sem of Soph year and 1st sem of Junior year I got A's. And as of 3rd quarter junior year I'm getting a B.

I write better fiction than essays. Boo hoo! :cry:I won't be good enough as an English Major!

Maybe I do have to rethink my options of majors I can take in college....

Oh the woes of college quickly approaching....

Red-Green
02-29-2008, 11:51 PM
III speaks wisdom. I have an MA in English and I'll always regret that I didn't follow the professional ninja track instead.
you should drop out of school and become a professional ninja.

Hillary
02-29-2008, 11:54 PM
Eh, don't feel bad. And I didn't see his reply as a major dis... He was just generalizing his experience to the population at large - without really backing it up. People do that, don't stress. I've got a "worthless" major too. Psychology. As a computer systems engineer coming from RPI, I had a friend walk into 60K+ a year starting salary for a job he secured before he even got his diploma. So, yeah, if you want to make big bucks fast - engineering is the way to go. I'll never see that with just my undergraduate degree. But with graduate work, I'll do just fine for myself. I'm not worried about having a "worthless" major.

And neither should you. Chin up.

C.bronco
02-29-2008, 11:57 PM
The moral of the story - don't look for answers anywhere other than AW. Personally I think you should drop out of school and become a professional ninja. I think that would be a fun occupation. And also sell Amway products by day to subsidize your ninja business until it gets off the ground.

Where you live and where you're willing to commute will affect the marketibility of you and your English/Communications degrees.

With that said, it is awfully hard to start your own professional ninja business. The worst part is getting the word out because ninjas tend to be quiet folk. Selling Amway products, or enjoying various pyramid schemes, can be very time consuming, and your ninja skills are likely to suffer in the interim. This may result in your reduced effectiveness as a ninja, and thereby sabotage your business model.

Best of luck if pursuing professional ninjahood is what you really want to do. we, here at AW, will certainly support you in your decision!

Maryn
03-01-2008, 12:22 AM
Actually, although I think I've only asked 3 or 4 questions at Yahoo Answers, I answer questions there often, especially in the Books and Authors section. Somebody's got to counter the know-nothing replies, right?

There's an amazing number of people spouting misinformation there, and a sadly large number of people who don't know the most basic things about, well, anything. (I answer a lot of "am i pregnunt?" questions, too.)

Maryn, who recommends AW a lot

eldragon
03-01-2008, 12:44 AM
I sometimes answer questions on Yahoo Answers, and it's amazing how many completely wrong answers I have seen people posting there.

I'm talking medical questions.


I mean, people who have no idea what they are talking about are giving medical advice.


And then there are the questions about sex. GEEZ.

sassandgroove
03-01-2008, 01:27 AM
I don't go to yahoo answers. I didn't even go there when I had questions about my yahoo mail.

WendyNYC
03-01-2008, 01:48 AM
I just had a BA in English and I went on to have a pretty darn successful career in television and print advertising. I also know lots of people in Public Relations with BAs or MAs in English. Never did I consider teaching. It's just not my calling.

DWSTXS
03-01-2008, 01:55 AM
Most of the 'answers' I'v seen on Yahoo answers are from H S kids who have no idea what theyre talking about. The entire forum seems like just asking random people what they think about something.
It doesn't seem to be a place to get answers from experts who know what they're talking about.

Now, you take your average AW'er. IQ=159-188 great looking. suave. sexy. professional. interesting. fun.

See?

Kate Thornton
03-01-2008, 02:18 AM
Now, you take youraverage AW'er. IQ=159-188 great looking. suave. sexy. professional. interesting. fun.

See?[/quote]

Wow - I am impressed. You *really* know us!

DWSTXS
03-01-2008, 02:23 AM
Wow - I am impressed. You *really* know us!
Kate Thornton -
***

Of course I do. Aren't I your leader?
LOL

We ALL make our way through the world via AW.

And it's always great to be able to come back to the Mothership when we need to get away from the hordes of the great unwashed 'out there'

Anthony Matias
03-01-2008, 02:55 AM
Actually, although I think I've only asked 3 or 4 questions at Yahoo Answers, I answer questions there often, especially in the Books and Authors section. Somebody's got to counter the know-nothing replies, right?

There's an amazing number of people spouting misinformation there, and a sadly large number of people who don't know the most basic things about, well, anything. (I answer a lot of "am i pregnunt?" questions, too.)

Maryn, who recommends AW a lot

I remember seeing you there Maryn. I asked you if I was "pregnunt" and you said absolutely!

Going to go watch Rabbit test now.

davids
03-01-2008, 03:10 AM
hell you think you got problems-i have a masters in psychology and am a doctor of music and i still have a hell of a time pooing!

Tedium
03-01-2008, 12:23 PM
My favorite setion of Yahoo Answers is the section on STDs. Why on earth would you ask a question like that on a forum? Why not just go to the doctor?

The world is a strange and perplexing place, my friends.

Appalachian Writer
03-01-2008, 06:24 PM
With all due respect to your choice of majors, I'd do some deep thinking before I invest in this graduate endeavor. I have an MA in English with a concentration in American Literature. I might fare better in career if I had an MFA in Creative Writing or something closely related, some kind of terminal degree. As of now, my career is that of an adjunct instructor at a small state university. I can't be hired full time here unless the university, itself, creates a "special purpose faculty" position, which is not necessarily long-term employment. Based on my efforts and research into the job market, jobs at junior college level (education, and the level I'm qualified to teach), there's no shortage of teachers wanting employment. In fact, there's a glut. If you're going to work toward a graduate degree in English, (and if I had it to do all over again) I'd work toward that PhD. True, an English major doesn't have to teach. If your goal is law school, you're set. If you're looking for a job in technical writing, an MA focus in technical will serve you well. But beyond those two things...the days when English majors got any level of respect are quickly retreating behind all the technology degrees. Even if you choose to go into the human resources aspect of industry, a degree in English is useless because these days you can get an MS in resource management. I don't like to be the wet blanket, but the ranting you read from Yahoo answers might very well have come from someone in my own position. I would never knowingly discourage an endeavor into furthering education, but I would advise you to think long and hard as to how you expect to use this major. Loving your subject is, of course, a must, but (and this is a big but) you have to survive in THIS world, not some imaginary place where all things really work for the good of the whole. To survive in the employment marketplace may very well mean that you minor in English (something you love) and major in one of those awful, pragmatic things that will actually help you earn a living. If the communications aspect of your major is in anyway leveled toward public speaking and education in same, nix it off your list. If, however, your communications aspect suggests anything involved in technology, it's a GO with a big green light. If it's speech and communication and has anything to do with healthcare/speech therapy that's a go. There's lots of things to think about, so make your decision with your head and not your heart.

Kerr
03-01-2008, 07:00 PM
As a writer, I can't think of many more worthwhile studies to go into than computer technologies. It just makes sense that knowing how to work one of these gadgets would do wonders toward your writing career--AND make you the money you need to get along in life, until the writing pay is comparable.

KarlaErikaCal
03-01-2008, 07:30 PM
Where you live and where you're willing to commute will affect the marketibility of you and your English/Communications degrees.

I live in the suburbs of Chicago, and I'm willing to commute there if necessary.

Kevin Yarbrough
03-01-2008, 08:40 PM
The ninja thing wasn't for you KC. You should become an assassian, they make more money and can use better toys and during the eveing supplement this with selling those secret party things that are becoming popular.

This is what I do.

KikiteNeko
03-02-2008, 12:24 AM
Everyone's a critic. I graduated with a BA in English with no intention of teaching. Although, honestly, I'm never planning to have a career. I plan to work as an administrative assistant to support my writing, which may or may not one day give me enough money to quit my day job. I'd be happy just to be a published novelist, and college has definitely gone a long way in helping me become more aware of my writing.

You should do what you think it best for you.

~grace~
03-02-2008, 02:30 AM
About to graduate with English and History double-majors. 90% of the people who know this say, "so, you're going to teach then?" As if that is my only option. It pisses me off. A lot.

I think what B.A.s do to your brain in general is more important than the actual facts you learn as part of your major. All the info I know about Anthony Trollope and Charles Dickens--is that going to help me in a professional career? No. But the way I learned to think by studying/writing about them will.

I hope.

By the way, if anyone wants to hire a History-English double major, let me know...

KikiteNeko
03-02-2008, 02:36 AM
Yep. My BA probably cost more money than I will ever make with it. But it was a necessary eye-opener to my writing and critical thinking. College was also a lesson in humility. People are constantly saying "So you're going to teach?" And I'll say "No." And they'll ask what I want to do. When I say "I want to write," they say, "You should consider being a substitute..."


About to graduate with English and History double-majors. 90% of the people who know this say, "so, you're going to teach then?" As if that is my only option. It pisses me off. A lot.

I think what B.A.s do to your brain in general is more important than the actual facts you learn as part of your major. All the info I know about Anthony Trollope and Charles Dickens--is that going to help me in a professional career? No. But the way I learned to think by studying/writing about them will.

I hope.

By the way, if anyone wants to hire a History-English double major, let me know...

~grace~
03-02-2008, 03:19 AM
People are constantly saying "So you're going to teach?" And I'll say "No." And they'll ask what I want to do. When I say "I want to write," they say, "You should consider being a substitute..."


Hahaha

Or another option I like (about painting, but I think it's transferable to writing):

"An amateur is an artist who supports himself with outside jobs which enable him to paint. A professional is someone whose wife works to enable him to paint."
--Ben Shahn (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Shahn)

KarlaErikaCal
03-02-2008, 04:01 AM
"An amateur is an artist who supports himself with outside jobs which enable him to paint. A professional is someone whose wife works to enable him to paint."
--Ben Shahn (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Shahn)

That will probably be my current boyfriend/future husband someday.

How do copywriters fare nowadays? I've heard from multiple sources now that online copywriting is the way to go. It was just a job I considered based on this career matchmaker thingamajigger. I was a bit upset at the fact it never said writer/author. But whatever, they didn't list much on the writer/author section either, so I'm guessing it would have been hard to match me with that?

I'll definitely stop by my college counselor's office and talk to her about future careers and see if that English major is something I should take or not. But thanks to everyone for your input so far.

KarlaErikaCal
03-02-2008, 04:03 AM
Oh and by the way Grace, tell me your experience with double-majoring. That was my initial question on Yahoo and I think you can offer something nicer than that one other person. I'm definitely interested in what you have to say now that you've said it.

Unique
03-02-2008, 05:15 AM
My favorite setion of Yahoo Answers is the section on STDs. Why on earth would you ask a question like that on a forum? Why not just go to the doctor?

The world is a strange and perplexing place, my friends.

Ain't that the truth (!)

Reminds me of my favorite bumper sticker: Stupid People Shouldn't Breed



How do copywriters fare nowadays? .

Google 'Red Hot Copy'. Sign up for the newsletters.

If you have ambition, motivation, and desire-you can succeed in any field you want to succeed in.<<< quit looking at my preposition

If you ever find those three in a spray or a roll on, please let me know.

Appalachian Writer
03-02-2008, 05:22 AM
Grace, you're right about the BA. Sometime during the first week of every semester, I try to explain the difference between a high school diploma and a Bachelor's degree. I tell them that in high school they were fed a series of facts and asked to regurgitate them on command...therefore...a high school diploma is like (forgive the phrase) a puking degree. I explain that a Bachelor's degree comes after eight semesters of applying the facts they've learned, thinking critically, and becoming problem solvers...therefore...a college degree is a THINKING degree; that's why employers pay more for someone with a college diploma. The employer expects that a person who has earned that Bachelor's Degree can solve problems. A BA or BS does something to your brain; it teaches the brain how to work!

~grace~
03-02-2008, 09:53 AM
Appalachian Writer, I love being right! :D



Oh and by the way Grace, tell me your experience with double-majoring. That was my initial question on Yahoo and I think you can offer something nicer than that one other person. I'm definitely interested in what you have to say now that you've said it.

I love it. It can be tough to get all the requirements in, so be careful with that, have a plan.

I came to school knowing I would be an English major. I started taking English classes immediately. Then sophomore year I took a history class, because I'd always liked history. I just hadn't realized how much I like history. I added that major. And I've never looked back.

One of the major pluses is that I have a couple different perspectives in looking at things. If I read a text, I'm reading it both as a student of English and of History. A much richer experience, and a different kind of understanding.

The only problem I came across was this semester. I was studying abroad last semester so I didn't take the classes I'd needed to take, so when I came back this semester I ended up having to take 4 really hard classes in order to finish both my majors. 4 1/2, really. (long story. involves me being dumb.) And I could have taken 3 classes, if I'd done some of these requirement sooner. So this semester's a lot busier than it needs to be.

So yeah. Great experience. Have a plan.

The only thing I would warn against--I don't know how your college will work. At mine, you can add/change majors up until your final semester so it's not an issue. But some schools make you declare earlier and stick to the major/s you declare. Be wary, and don't trap yourself in two majors unless you are ABSOLUTELY SURE that's what you want to do and you DON'T want to do anything. You change in college, you may discover something in your elective Psychology class that makes you want to take lots of Psych even if it's too late to add that major.

Hope that helps....