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dolores haze
02-08-2008, 07:53 PM
Hi, good people of AW. I need your help.

By Sunday I need to have made 12-15 posters for Black History Month. Each poster will have a picture of a famous African American, a snippet of a speech or a quote, and a discussion question.

The one I have just finished making has a picture of Barak Obama, a snippet of a speech, and the discussion question: "Is America ready for a black President?" Another I made has a picture of MLK, a snippet of his "I Have a Dream" speech, and the discussion question: "Has MLK's dream come true?". I'm working on one of Sojourner Truth, the entire "Ain't I A Woman" speech, and I'm still trying to think up a good discussion question.

The audience for this display will be teenagers and young adults of various races. The hope is to incite discussion and learning and inspiration. We hope to combine it with a voter registration drive.

I've got a few more ideas, but I'd really appreciate the input of others. Which African American has inspired you? Which speech has stayed with you? Which quote do you have displayed in your work space?

I appreciate your help. Thanks!

dolores haze
02-08-2008, 09:11 PM
Bumpity-Bump.

I'm making one on Alice Walker.

Anyone have any suggestions?

III
02-08-2008, 09:17 PM
Some that come to mind are:
Arthur Ashe
Rosa Parks
Oprah Winfrey
Colin Powell

III
02-08-2008, 09:19 PM
Oh, and a great recent story - Wesley Autrey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wesley_Autrey).

dolores haze
02-08-2008, 11:05 PM
Some that come to mind are:
Arthur Ashe
Rosa Parks
Oprah Winfrey
Colin Powell


Rosa Parks is already on the list, though I'll be offering a different perspective on her rather than the "poor, tired woman on a bus".

I like your Colin Powell and Oprah Winfrey suggestions. I don't want all the posters to be of dead people.

Arthur Ashe - Another good suggestion. I don't want to do too many athletes. I'm leaning towards Jesse Owens as a historical figure. And towards Tiger Woods as a current figure. I've got a great quote by him, and the discussion question is "who is black?" (or something a little more refined).

Thank you for your input, III. Reppies coming your way.

Anyone else want to chime in? I'm trying to decide on a couple of musicians.

What about Shel Silverstein? I don't know if the kids would be that familiar with him. He wrote "A Boy Named Sue", "Sylvia's Mother", many children's stories (including The Giving Tree) , poetry, screenplays. Too obscure?

III
02-08-2008, 11:10 PM
Gosh, there are so many musicians you could choose from. Unfortuantely some of my favorites wouldn't be considered good role models for their drug usage and other personal problems (Hendrix and Chuck Berry come to mind). Ohhh, how about Tina Turner - she's a great inspirational story. Or Ray Charles or Stevie Wonder.

quickWit
02-08-2008, 11:11 PM
Maya Angelou leaps to mind.

Thurgood Marshall
Jackie Robinson

dolores haze
02-08-2008, 11:31 PM
Interesting. I've gotten a couple of reps stating that Shel Silverstein is not African American. I've always assumed that he was, though this assumption comes only from his author photo in a couple of works of his that I own. Judging just from this picture - what race would you say Silverstein was?

http://chase.inthebasement.us/wp-content/shel_silverstein.gif

DeleyanLee
02-08-2008, 11:54 PM
The first person I thought of was Harriet Tubman (Conductor on the Underground Railroad), but I don't know if she made any speeches or not. She's always been an inspirational figure to me.

I'm very into history: George Washington Carver is another notable figure.

You can also check out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_African_American_firsts

III
02-08-2008, 11:58 PM
Interesting. I've gotten a couple of reps stating that Shel Silverstein is not African American. I've always assumed that he was, though this assumption comes only from his author photo in a couple of works of his that I own. Judging just from this picture - what race would you say Silverstein was?

http://chase.inthebasement.us/wp-content/shel_silverstein.gif

I'd say he's getting ready to throw me a serious beating if I don't buy his book regardless of his race. I need to get a badass author photo like that so I'll sell more books.

cray
02-09-2008, 12:00 AM
I need to get a badass author photo like that

stop drinking chi latte and caramel macchiato and the rest will take care of itself :D

*vanishes*

Moonshade
02-09-2008, 12:07 AM
Frederick Douglass, born into slavery, taught himself to read. Became a great orator.

Booker T. Washington

George Washington Carver (he invented so many different uses for peanuts!),

Fannie Lou Hammer and her famous quote "I'm sick and tired of being sick and tired."

Oscar Micheux, one of the pioneering black filmmakers from the early 20th century.

Paul Robeson, singer, actor, writer, civil-rights activist and all-around brilliant man.

Gordon Parks, the famous self-taught Photographer for Life magazine. He wrote a novel based on his life called "The Learning Tree". It was also made into a movie. He also wrote two memoirs. He passed away two years ago in his 90's.

Marva Collins, the school teacher in Chicago who in the late 70's started a school in her own home to properly educate black children. Her methods are now famous as are her schools.

Madame CJ Wallker, the first black female millionare. She made millions in the early 20th century selling hair care products to other black women.

And you can always pick up a copy of Basketball great Kareem Abdul Jabbar's book Black Profiles in Courage: A Legacy of African American Acheivement for more ideas.

This is off the top of my head, but I hope this helps.

JoeEkaitis
02-09-2008, 12:22 AM
Bill Cosby, with quotes from his recent speeches and addresses about personal responsibility.

dolores haze
02-09-2008, 12:42 AM
Gosh, there are so many musicians you could choose from. Unfortuantely some of my favorites wouldn't be considered good role models for their drug usage and other personal problems (Hendrix and Chuck Berry come to mind). Ohhh, how about Tina Turner - she's a great inspirational story. Or Ray Charles or Stevie Wonder.

Yeah, I really wanted to do Billie Holliday. I'm a huge fan of hers, but the drug usage... I'm not sure how to handle this. These kids are into rap, and I'd like to include a rapper, but which one? I wonder if Chuck D. be too old school for them?

billythrilly7th
02-09-2008, 01:18 AM
http://nymag.com/images/2/daily/entertainment/07/04/26_snoopdog_lgl.jpg

"Ho Ho Ho."

http://www.hecklerspray.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/08/gary-coleman.jpg

"Whatch you talkin about, Willis?"

III
02-09-2008, 01:32 AM
Yeah, I really wanted to do Billie Holliday. I'm a huge fan of hers, but the drug usage... I'm not sure how to handle this. These kids are into rap, and I'd like to include a rapper, but which one? I wonder if Chuck D. be too old school for them?

Chuck D. might be a controversial choice. He certainly was/is a very strong voice for the African American community but I don't know how some parents would react to having him held up as a role model.

Silver King
02-09-2008, 02:48 AM
How about the actor, Sidney Poitier? He also directed films and has done a fair amount of writing.

Not only was he the first African American to win an Oscar for Best Actor, but he helped pave the way for black actors to be taken seriously in the American film industry.

JoeEkaitis
02-09-2008, 02:49 AM
Condoleezza Rice.

dolores haze
02-09-2008, 02:56 AM
Paul Robeson, singer, actor, writer, civil-rights activist and all-around brilliant man.


Excellent list, Moonshade, and thank you very much for your help.

I've read Paul Robeson's bigraphy twice. He certainly was a remarkable man. I'm really tempted to include a poster on him. I wonder if the boss will allow it. I don't know to what extent he is still considered a highly controversial figure. Y'know what? I'm going to include him on the list, and let the boss make the call.

benbradley
02-09-2008, 02:57 AM
For Presidential aspirations (the first African-American major party candidate - perhaps some older parents will remember her), in addition to Obama, here's a name I remember: Shirley Chisholm (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shirley_Chisholm)

A more historical (as in way before my time!) figure is W.E.B Du Bois, though I did hear a Folkways LP by him, essentially a spoken-word autobiography, recorded circa 1951.

Yeah, I really wanted to do Billie Holliday. I'm a huge fan of hers, but the drug usage... I'm not sure how to handle this. These kids are into rap, and I'd like to include a rapper, but which one? I wonder if Chuck D. be too old school for them?It seems so many musical figures of any race are touched by excessive drinking and/or drugging that you can't get away from it. You might want to have just such a person as an "object lesson" and mention drugs as a "hazard of the profession" of pop music or some such. For this you could go for Jimi Hendrix, surely a guitar legend that younger kids might still know the name. I recall a story of how a manager or record producer took him to England to produce and publicize his first album, because there was supposedly less negativity towards a black guy playing that kind of music there than in the USA.

dolores haze
02-09-2008, 03:26 AM
Maya Angelou leaps to mind.

Thurgood Marshall
Jackie Robinson


The first person I thought of was Harriet Tubman (Conductor on the Underground Railroad), but I don't know if she made any speeches or not. She's always been an inspirational figure to me.

I'm very into history: George Washington Carver is another notable figure.



How about the actor, Sidney Poitier? He also directed films and has done a fair amount of writing.

Not only was he the first African American to win an Oscar for Best Actor, but he helped pave the way for black actors to be taken seriously in the American film industry.


Condoleezza Rice.


These are already on, or have been added to, the list. Thank you all so very much.

dolores haze
02-09-2008, 03:33 AM
http://nymag.com/images/2/daily/entertainment/07/04/26_snoopdog_lgl.jpg

"Ho Ho Ho."

http://www.hecklerspray.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/08/gary-coleman.jpg

"Whatch you talkin about, Willis?"


Yeah, I get it. The long and short of black history. You are so very amusing. I like both those guys, and I'm sure they'd be thrilled about your high opinion of them. Could you, perhaps, try again? And do a better job next time or don't even bother. Or are you being sincere? These are really the people you think deserve a place in black history? If this is the case...oh, nevermind. I've got a lot of work to get done.

Silver King
02-09-2008, 04:50 AM
If you have room for another writer, Toni Morrison might be a good choice. She won a Pulitzer Prize for fiction with Beloved.

She was also the first African American woman to take home that Big Swedish Award for Literature they give out in Oslo every year.

dolores haze
02-09-2008, 04:51 AM
Chuck D. might be a controversial choice. He certainly was/is a very strong voice for the African American community but I don't know how some parents would react to having him held up as a role model.


I've been thinking about this. The kids are all sixteen and over. I already have some controversial people on the list. I have found many excellent quotes by him. So Chuck's getting a poster. I think the parents would have a problem if I had a poster of 50cent, but I'm hoping they'll be OK with Chuck. Thanks, III, it was a good reminder.

dolores haze
02-09-2008, 07:17 PM
For Presidential aspirations (the first African-American major party candidate - perhaps some older parents will remember her), in addition to Obama, here's a name I remember: Shirley Chisholm (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shirley_Chisholm)

A more historical (as in way before my time!) figure is W.E.B Du Bois, though I did hear a Folkways LP by him, essentially a spoken-word autobiography, recorded circa 1951.


Du Bois was already on the list. I've added Shirley Chisholm. Thanks, Ben.



It seems so many musical figures of any race are touched by excessive drinking and/or drugging that you can't get away from it. You might want to have just such a person as an "object lesson" and mention drugs as a "hazard of the profession" of pop music or some such. For this you could go for Jimi Hendrix, surely a guitar legend that younger kids might still know the name. I recall a story of how a manager or record producer took him to England to produce and publicize his first album, because there was supposedly less negativity towards a black guy playing that kind of music there than in the USA.

Oh, thank you! This is exactly how I'm going to handle it. The discussion question for Jimi will be: "What might Jimi have accomplished had he not killed himself with drugs?" or something similar. I'm so glad you've helped me find a way to include him, and others, who had drug problems. This is a very relevent issue for the kids who will be the audience for this presentation. Thanks again!


If you have room for another writer, Toni Morrison might be a good choice. She won a Pulitzer Prize for fiction with Beloved.

She was also the first African American woman to take home that Big Swedish Award for Literature they give out in Oslo every year.

Absolutely, Toni is on the list!

dolores haze
02-10-2008, 10:19 PM
Thanks, everyone, for your help. I've been busy all weekend making posters. Here is one of them.



Paul Robeson




http://www.africawithin.com/bios/robeson.jpg



"My father was a slave and my people died to build this country, and I'm going to stay right here and have a part of it, just like you. And no fascist-minded people like you will drive me from it. Is that clear?"
(Testifying in front of the House Un-American Activities Committee, 1956.)






Discussion question: What, in your opinion, is an un-american activity?