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ExposingCorruption
02-05-2008, 04:31 AM
I thought that my book might be more presentable and professional if it had some photos, so I found some on the internet, But then I read about photos costing more and sometimes the author has to come up with the money if they want photos included in their book. I can do my book without photos, so should I just skip the photos?

SHBueche
02-05-2008, 04:58 AM
To me, this question really runs the gamut. It is hard for me to say because I'm a nonfiction photo person ... but is your book fiction? nonfiction? If not photos, will you include illustrations? charts? or were you just envisioning photos breaking up the text?

johnrobison
02-05-2008, 05:30 AM
Once you have a publisher you should discuss the photos with them.

IceCreamEmpress
02-05-2008, 05:43 AM
Your book isn't going to be enhanced by photos you found on the Internet. If the publisher wants photos, they'll buy them from the agents and photographers, and someone from the art department will source them.

johnrobison
02-05-2008, 06:06 AM
Your book isn't going to be enhanced by photos you found on the Internet. If the publisher wants photos, they'll buy them from the agents and photographers, and someone from the art department will source them.

The only thing I'd add to that is this . . . the publisher may well say YOU (the author) must buy the rights to the photos, as the advance they paid you covered all necessary rights to publish the book. That's also true for rights to quote songs in your book, BTW.

For most memoirs, the photos are the property of the author, or otherwise available to him, so cost is not an issue. But for other books, it's a big deal.

And there's a cost to putting in a photo spread. Will it sell more books? That's an editorial decision.

That's why I'd wait to take it up once you have a publisher

Prevostprincess
02-05-2008, 06:15 AM
My book is a travel memoir and I took a ton of fabulous photos while on our trip. Will any be included in the book? No. It's just too darn expensive. (That's yet another reason to have an author website - readers can go to it to read/see/learn more.)

IceCreamEmpress
02-05-2008, 07:59 AM
The only thing I'd add to that is this . . . the publisher may well say YOU (the author) must buy the rights to the photos, as the advance they paid you covered all necessary rights to publish the book. That's also true for rights to quote songs in your book, BTW.

Yes. Very good point.

However, the publisher can usually get a better rate from a big photo agency than an individual can.

ExposingCorruption
02-05-2008, 08:05 AM
Thanks for all the input! There is only one photo that I would actually need. It is really a medical drawing from NetterImages.com. It costs $331.00 for 50,000 copies that are going to be used in a book.

There is also a photo from the Gerald Ford Library and they don't charge for use of their photos. The other photos are from government documents.

kimmer
02-05-2008, 09:05 AM
I'm perplexed on this one. Technically speaking, if a photo is in black and white, why does it cost more to print? Black ink is black ink. I will have four to six photos in my book, I pitched that in the proposal, I took the photos and I handled the image release forms. My publisher hasn't balked at this (yet). gulp. My book is a how-to book and has more graphics than most that my publisher takes on but I can't imagine my book without good visual appeal and photos. I guess we'll see what happens.

kimmer

johnrobison
02-05-2008, 03:48 PM
Kimmer, it costs more to print because the photo inserts in a hardcover book are printed on glossy paper in a separate run from the main pages, and then inserted and bound. Look at a hardcover photo insert and note the different paper and printing, even if it's b&w

Lauri B
02-05-2008, 07:09 PM
Exposing Corruption, hold off on buying the photos, but if the particular photo collection is important to your book, definitely include the recommendation and source in your proposal. That way your publisher knows what you'd LIKE to include and even a lead on where to find the photos you think would work well, and go from there.

ExposingCorruption
02-05-2008, 10:59 PM
Thanks, Laurie. Does that mean that I shouldn't include ANY photos in my MS and that I should just discuss it after I get a publisher? I don't even have an agent yet.

K1P1
02-06-2008, 05:39 AM
ExposingCorruption, since nonfiction books can be sold with a proposal and not a full manuscript, there's really no need for photos or images while you're trying to sell it, unless the agent or publisher won't be able to understand the concept or content without the image. I write knitting books, and in both of the books I've written so far (one published, one currently in design), the text came first. My contract specifies that I need to submit, with the ms., items for photography, suggestions for illustrations and possible sources. The publisher foots the bill for the actual photography. My current book will have somewhere in the neighborhood of 300 photos. So I'd recommend that you not worry about the photos until you're at the point of negotiating the contract.

LC123
02-06-2008, 11:01 PM
I wrote a textbook with ~1,000 illustrations in it; many are color photos. I took some of the photos myself, but most came from other sources. Companies who make the products you discuss are gold. They will give you their photos for free, as opposed to photo libraries who, as you found out, want large sums and restrict usage.

Many companies have press or media rooms they will give you access to, once you tell them that you're publishing a book (some will want details, e.g., the publisher, how you'll use their photos, etc.). These press rooms are treasure troves of high-res images.

You can't just pluck photos off the web because 1. you're probably infringing on a copyright, and 2. they'll be low-res. You need high-res photos for publication, at least 300 dpi.

ExposingCorruption
02-07-2008, 01:08 AM
You can't just pluck photos off the web because 1. you're probably infringing on a copyright, and 2. they'll be low-res. You need high-res photos for publication, at least 300 dpi.

With the execption of a medical drawing for which I would have to pay, the other photos I found online are available at the National Archives.

If I get a request for a full MS, should I remove the photos before sending it?

LC123
02-07-2008, 02:10 AM
If you have a full MS, I would think that you'd already have the photos needed to illustrate it. If you are just submitting a TOC and a couple of sample chapters, you might include web photos and explain that your own illustrations will be similar to them.

ExposingCorruption
02-07-2008, 03:58 AM
If you have a full MS, I would think that you'd already have the photos needed to illustrate it. If you are just submitting a TOC and a couple of sample chapters, you might include web photos and explain that your own illustrations will be similar to them.

I found the photos on the Internet but I haven't printed any of them out. Like I said, they are all available at the National Archives. I don't actually need the photos to illustrate my MS. I just thought that it would be a good idea to have some photos. Books often have photos.

I'm really trying to determine if an MS is just as good without photos. Should I leave them out for now, seeing as how they're not necessary, and discuss the possibility of photos with the publisher later?

LC123
02-07-2008, 09:14 PM
EC, you are the best one to determine if your MS is just as good without photos. If you determine that it needs photos, then of course you should include them with your sample chapters (I'm inferring that you're in the query process). I don't think an editor should be the one deciding if your MS needs photos; an editor will guide you as to their appropriateness, quality, and of course, the amount you can have.

kimmer
02-08-2008, 12:41 AM
Ahhh. Thank you. I guess since my book is paperback I won't have that issue. Funny that I forget some folks will debut in hardcover.