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View Full Version : Dialogue Discussion/Debate: People don't talk like this.



BlueLucario
02-02-2008, 02:00 AM
Well, I was at another forum and this kid got his work critted. Most of his piece consisted of dialogue, what I'm a stickler for. And his work is about a thirteen year old modern day scientist, who's parents worked for NASA. He tends to use big words like arrogant condescending, belligerance. He has an I.Q of 150. The other critters say that kids his age don't talk like this, therefore his dialogue is not natural. I sort of disagree with them. This kid got really defensive, and said just because kids don't talk this way doesn't mean he can't. I'm not talking about critiques. My point is why do people have to comply to what society does.

When people say, "people his age don't do this" "An 94 year old lady does not know how to use an I-Pod." "A twelve year old does not talk in such a formal mature way."

I disagree, any kid can behave and can talk in a certain way, depending on how they were raised. You can't say that he can't do this, just because other people like him aren't capable of this. I don't know why critters tend to tell other writers to make their characters conform to society's standards. I don't have a problem with it, it just doesn't feel right.

Thoughts?

Scrawler
02-02-2008, 02:07 AM
Kid geniuses who speak like highly educated adults are annoying, but that's really how they talk.
Grandmothers who curse (like Jay Leno's The Fruitcake Lady) are funny because they shock.

There's probably a big psychological explanation of why people feel the need to have others conform, but with fiction, I think there's creating unique, memorable characters--and then there's making them believable.

IceCreamEmpress
02-02-2008, 02:12 AM
There are two reasons someone would give that feedback:

1) They have a limited imagination as a reader;
2) The writer didn't make it believable in the story.

Not having read the story in question, it's hard for me to know which is the case.

BlueLucario
02-02-2008, 02:13 AM
And people don't have to comply with what "society" wants ("society" is such a nebulous term because norms depend so much on the specific people you associate with).

When I hear "society", the first thing that comes to mind is high school popularity.

Alexandra Little
02-02-2008, 02:15 AM
I spoke like that at 13. And my friends make fun of me for using big words in instant messages. My characters tend to be older than they actually are, mostly because their situation calls for it.

But you're never going to be able to correct people who insist they know how someone speaks/acts. Most people don't even believe my age when they meet me because I seem so much more mature. I even had to pull out my license once when an older woman kept calling me a liar.

BlueLucario
02-02-2008, 02:16 AM
You clearly have an ongoing problem with critters. From day one I thought it would just serve them well to tell you what you want to hear. The critters could be saying this about the things you mentioned because in the writing being discussed it just doesn't ring true. If the same critters read another piece with a 12 year old talking intelligently and they bought it hook, line and sinker, they might not make the same comments. Chances are it's just bad writing that pulled them out of believing in the dialogue.


I don't have a problem with critters. I never said anything bad, I wasn't involved. It's just a theory I came up with. I just want to talk about a debate that was going on somewhere else. I would agree with dialogue, like people won't talk in such a tedious manner, or people don't talk in a complete sentence. Or some dialogue is inconsistent to the time period.

I used big words when I was twelve. I don't know why compared to other children.

BlueLucario
02-02-2008, 02:22 AM
I understand how you would come to this conclusion...this theory...based on what you've said about critters in the past. .

Not really BASED on the critters. But observing, other children. It's the way they were raised that will determine who they will be when they reach their teens or adulthood

drachin8
02-02-2008, 02:29 AM
I think the main issue here is the more your character deviates from "the norm" (as expected by that particular reader), the harder you (the author) must work to convince the reader that the character is plausible.

Sometimes, a character will succeed for one person while failing miserably for another. Different readers, different expectations.

The hard part then, as an author, is telling when your character has crossed over the intangible line of being implausible to the audience you are aiming at.

Agree? Disagree? Like apples?


:)

-Michelle

BlueLucario
02-02-2008, 02:30 AM
IMO, I will agree with these guys about the unnatural dialogue. If the character stands out from his peers. If every single 12 year old in a story talks in the same way he does, unless they're clones, then that is something I would consider unnatural. But if this kid talks like a genius and his peers talk like well, "kids", then I wouldn't see anything wrong with it.

Bubastes
02-02-2008, 02:36 AM
Why are we spending time talking about another writer's crit? For all we know, the writer is already incorporating the suggestions (or not, as he/she sees fit) from the crit and has moved on.

Shady Lane
02-02-2008, 02:38 AM
To make precocious children work, in my experience, they need that combination of intellectual maturity and emotional immaturity.

BlueLucario
02-02-2008, 02:41 AM
You are talking about the situation now, not the writing.

That's the the point of this thread, KTC. To discuss why people would compare an "unusual" kid to a "normal" kid his age. This kind of stuff reminds me of school.(I can't wait till I graduate.) If you comply to high school standards, then you're considered normal, otherwise you're considered weird and you must be shunned.

BlueLucario
02-02-2008, 03:03 AM
Can we please stop talking about crits? This is not why I started this discussion.

Mr Flibble
02-02-2008, 03:04 AM
I think the writing may not have come across well in context

when my son was two he was using words like apparantly in context

when he was four I had to explain about gravity.

When he was eight he came up with an idea for travelling to a parallel universe that, while not actually possible (at the moment), I may well incorporate into a story

Today, at age nine, he said he wouldn't do something unless it was mutually beneficial. And we had to explain the concept of communism and how power corrupts etc...


He's not that unusual for a kid his age, ( we do talk about stuff a lot though). Most of his friends have a similar vocabulary. A kid at twelve could, quite easily, use those words.


Either the writer didn't make his character clear enough. Or the critters know no one under the age of ohhh twenty five. I believe it's probably the former.

BlueLucario
02-02-2008, 03:08 AM
Either the writer didn't make his character clear enough. Or the critters know no one under the age of ohhh twenty five. I believe it's probably the former.

Unless they were that kid's age at least five years ago, then they shouldn't stereotype.

BlueTexas
02-02-2008, 03:11 AM
When people say, "people his age don't do this" "An 94 year old lady does not know how to use an I-Pod." "A twelve year old does not talk in such a formal mature way."


Thoughts?

My husband's 84 year old Grandma had never used a cell phone in her life, but she picked up my iphone, and as soon as I unlocked it, she made a phone call with no help. She also figured out the camera and picture viewing functions on her own. She was a secretary, not a rocket scientist.

My point is that life never happens the way people think it should, or expect it should. That's what so cool about it. Ignore closed minds and generalized assumptions :)

Mr Flibble
02-02-2008, 03:15 AM
Unless they were that kid's age at least five years ago, then they shouldn't stereotype.

Unlees you've been anything you shouldn't stereotype. Even if you have you shouldn't stereotype. But it happens.

My point was, the writing either wasn't clear enough OR you have a bunch of people who stereotype for a living. Probably the former.

SageFury
02-02-2008, 03:33 AM
Close minded critiques are the worst...

geardrops
02-02-2008, 03:37 AM
Topic: Stereotypes in Writing (Particularly Characterization).

Question: Can you break them without jarring the reader, or will reader preconceptions always come into play with your writing?

Answer: Yes

Thread done :)

CaroGirl
02-02-2008, 03:39 AM
Person A can write anything he wants. If Person A puts it up for critique, likewise Person B can say anything he wants about A's writing. If A has done his job well, B might have little to criticize and be full of compliments. If A hasn't done his job well, B knows something's wrong with it. If he's inexperienced as a writer or critter, he might not know what's wrong with it but he'll pick something obvious, like the precocious language of the protagonist. There might not be anything intrinsically wrong with the young character using big words but the writing isn't good enough to make him believe it.

And so it goes. There's nothing wrong with a 12-year-old using big words. When I was 12 I had a huge vocabulary. Not a lot of friends, but a HUGE vocabulary.

IceCreamEmpress
02-02-2008, 03:42 AM
The dialogue might seem unrealistic to any given reader because of that reader's limitations. Or it might seem unrealistic because of the limitations of the dialogue itself.

There is no piece of writing that has 100% approval, after all. Many people find Cormac McCarthy's dialogue terse and gritty. I find it silly. Obviously, Cormac McCarthy could not give one metric tinker's fart about my opinion.


Part of being a writer, in my opinion, is learning how to separate signal from static in other people's reactions. On the other hand, it's not always static. I'm reminded of Carl Sagan's great comment:

...the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright Brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.

CaroGirl
02-02-2008, 03:45 AM
Oh, and let's not forget that critiques are opinions. Not facts.

Atlantis
02-02-2008, 03:47 AM
If the kid's parents work for NASA then I think its more then believable that he would use long "intelligent" words for his age if his parents work for one of the top scientific organizations in the world. Childern reflect the people around them. If he was raised among scientists, then he would use the same language they do, because that's how he was raised. In Star Trek Voyager a child is born on the ship in season two. She is raised on the vessel, the only child in a crew of 200 adult humans and aliens who are scientists. By the time she is four she speaks like a mature young adult and is deeply involved in science and maths. Its all how they're raised.

Qui
02-02-2008, 03:50 AM
My friend's little sister goes on short honeymoons with new words she likes. One week, it was "facetious." Next, she loved "abominable." It was strange to hear her say "I was being facetious" instead of "I was joking," but she's a smart girl so it ended up just being annoying.

She was nine at the time, which actually means nothing. Kids speak as they are taught to speak. The sons of my Episcopalian rector talk like they're performing surgery with dull knives. One of them used "ineffable" the other day in place of "unspeakable." He said, "I know the right context for it, so it doesn't matter that I don't know the definition of it." Except he replaced every word he could with a longer one.

Point is, long words aren't a sign of True Genius. Real geniuses (and I see that character conveniently just passes for one, I.Q.-wise) know how to explain things in simple terms—like Prof. Stephen Hawking, who wrote A Brief History of Time. I would suggest that book for anyone wanting to write smart characters.

I was a precocious child, but my mother never let me be ridiculous. Thank God for her; I was firmly tethered to the ground. I'm not a Genius, as far as the oh-so-important I.Q. test, but I do qualify for MENSA (like that's something to brag about anymore!). That said, I didn't use long words, but I knew what they meant. But I could talk to people and ask them intelligent questions. Somehow I've lost the knack of talking to others, but I still got the right questions.

However, I'm linguistically and creatively gifted. Logical people have different opinions about words (Lojban, anyone?), so I suppose my wall o' text wouldn't be very useful. They tend to value numbers more, including Number of Words in Vocabulary (and how many times you can say them all).

I knew a 174-I.Q. Physics major, back when I had no choice but to interact with idiots like him. All other sciences were ridiculous compared to Physics; all subjects other than science and mathematics were laughable and not worth discussion. If your I.Q. wasn't over 150, you were an idiot, of course. He was an empty person. It sounds like the writer is trying too hard to prove that his character is SMRT (http://icanhascheezburger.files.wordpress.com/2007/06/3.jpg), or the character is trying too hard (http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u182/rach_lea/smart_lol.jpg). Otherwise, it would feel natural, and people wouldn't bring it up.

I remain,
The only person who used lolcats in this discussion,
Entirely devoted to the cause of LOLnglsh,
And generally less fun than I let on,
Q.

SageFury
02-02-2008, 03:50 AM
The Disney movie Genius has a 14 yr old discussing graviton gibberish to a professor and showing him up a little...

I don't see why Disney can get away with it and you can't =)

Chase
02-02-2008, 03:57 AM
My husband's 84 year old Grandma had never used a cell phone in her life, but she picked up my iphone, and as soon as I unlocked it, she made a phone call with no help. She also figured out the camera and picture viewing functions on her own. She was a secretary, not a rocket scientist. :)

Blue Texas. Only slightly tongue-in-cheek: Your example is horribly skewed. The only rocket scientist I ever met was the stereotype. He knew volumes on one tiny subject. Otherwise, he often seemed to wander in a fog. Had his secretary not known everything, as secretaries must, none of his thoughts would have made it from his notepads, whiteboards, napkins, etc. to the rockets.

I learned two valuable lessons early in my teaching career: Get on the good sides of the janitors and secretaries.

Sorry, but your hubby's granny may be awesome, but that's just typical.

megan_d
02-02-2008, 04:27 AM
Yet another thread by Blue that starts with "I was on another forum and..."

BlueTexas
02-02-2008, 04:32 AM
Blue Texas. Only slightly tongue-in-cheek: Your example is horribly skewed. The only rocket scientist I ever met was the stereotype. He knew volumes on one tiny subject. Otherwise, he often seemed to wander in a fog. Had his secretary not known everything, as secretaries must, none of his thoughts would have made it from his notepads, whiteboards, napkins, etc. to the rockets.

I learned two valuable lessons early in my teaching career: Get on the good sides of the janitors and secretaries.

Sorry, but your hubby's granny may be awesome, but that's just typical.

Having never met a rocket scientist, I can see how I was skewed :)

icerose
02-02-2008, 04:38 AM
All it has to do is fit the story and the character and it's fine.

If, however, he has a 3rd grade drop out living on the street talking like that, then I can see where the problem is at.

Just make it fit and no one will question, make your own realities.

Linda Adams
02-02-2008, 04:54 AM
My point is why do people have to comply to what society does.

When people say, "people his age don't do this" "An 94 year old lady does not know how to use an I-Pod." "A twelve year old does not talk in such a formal mature way."

I disagree, any kid can behave and can talk in a certain way, depending on how they were raised. You can't say that he can't do this, just because other people like him aren't capable of this. I don't know why critters tend to tell other writers to make their characters conform to society's standards. I don't have a problem with it, it just doesn't feel right.

I don't think it's so much an issue with behavior and society so much as what makes good fiction. Often, real life, interpreted literally, doesn't make for good reading. It's up to the writer to identify the best elements and reshape it into his story in a way that's entertaining to the reader.

As you study dialogue techniques, you'll run across something about this in probably every book about the subject. Just listen to two people stop and greet each other. They may talk for five minutes about nothing before getting down to the subject. In a book, you can't spend a page talking about nothing before getting to the point.

Likewise, I know someone who is in Mensa and uses words like "algorithm" in every day conversation. But if I tried to reproduce the way he talked accurately in dialogue, it wouldn't translate well; the character would end up at best sounding boring; at worst, unlikable.

It always has to go back to what makes a good story.

Stew21
02-02-2008, 05:16 AM
It doesn't matter WHAT society says. It just has to be written well.

period.

like kevin said, sell your readers on the believability.

Zelenka
02-02-2008, 05:21 AM
Just echoing what most people have said (as usual) but whether you're writing a twist on people's perceptions or reworking an established stereotype, you just have to make the character believable and likeable (even if they're a villain, or a rotter, you need your readers to care about them).

Anyway, isn't the precocious child genius thing a bit of a stereotype in itself, as in the child of NASA scientists sort of thing? (I immediately thought of Rupert Grint in that film 'Thunderpants'). I mean, not showing off ;) , I joined Mensa when I was 19, was a member for a year and didn't bother renewing my subscription (seriously, all you got was a magazine full of people saying how smart they were or with word puzzles in, and news about the latest scrabble game being held in the local pub). But I'm dozy and pretty slow most of the time.

Polenth
02-02-2008, 06:07 AM
Unless they were that kid's age at least five years ago, then they shouldn't stereotype.

You need to back away from the stereotypes yourself. You don't have to have been a kid five years ago to put yourself into the mindset of a child. Some older adults never left it. You'll ignore a lot of good advice if you'll only take it from people the same age as the character.

Novelhistorian
02-02-2008, 07:23 AM
If your character is credible, a critter shouldn't dismiss the dialogue out of hand. But if the critter can say why he's not credible--beyond the blanket statement--then you might want to pay attention.

On the other hand, it's also possible that this critter isn't a good reader for your work. You're free to ignore the advice, just as he's free to say whatever he likes.

BlueLucario
02-02-2008, 05:03 PM
If your character is credible, a critter shouldn't dismiss the dialogue out of hand. But if the critter can say why he's not credible--beyond the blanket statement--then you might want to pay attention.

On the other hand, it's also possible that this critter isn't a good reader for your work. You're free to ignore the advice, just as he's free to say whatever he likes.

Itt's not me, it's that kid. There was a debate like this going on somewhere else.

I just want to prove my point. Any kid can talk in a certain way, depending on how they were raised.

gp101
02-02-2008, 05:30 PM
A 90-year-old that can access an i-Pod or freely use a comlpex cell is a refreshing character in fiction from the stereotypical elderly person whose "VCR" (do people still use those?) still blinks 12:00. Depending on the context of the story, maybe you might need to show that 90-year-old's peers struggle with such things, maybe not. Depends how you portray the elder.

Same thing with the kid genious. I've heard little brats on TV on particular shows asked about politics and such things and their answers are very thoughtful, sprinkled with words you don't normally associate with little punks. But they may be the exception. It's eye-opening to see kids speak in multi-syllabic words, where their vocabulary goes beyond the word "cool". But, as in the example of the elderly person, you may need to provide another kid who speaks with a more simplistic vocab. Or maybe not. Depends on the context of your story.

You don't have to, and you shouldn't, play up to pop cultures' expectations. Your characters will be dull, if not stereotypes. I hate it when the only black characters of a novel can all speak "street". Just cuz Jesse Jackson tried coining the word Ebonics and tried popularizing it, doesn't mean every black person speaks only in ebonics. The friends I have that happen to be black speak the same way I do, have similar vocabs as me, which isn't to say we're grammar geniuses. We just have an above-average vocab compared to "street" cred type of speak. Sometimes it may be percieved as not "normal" because of the portrayal of minorities, and young people of all kinds in general, through MTV, BET, and pop culture in general. That's how you get ignorant comments that Colin Powell and Borrack Obama "sound white". They just refuse to limit their vocabs. Your characters should do likewise when necessary.

dpaterso
02-02-2008, 05:40 PM
Itt's not me, it's that kid. There was a debate like this going on somewhere else.
And? Did you convince everyone on the other board that you're right?


I just want to prove my point. Any kid can talk in a certain way, depending on how they were raised.
That's so obvious, it's hardly worth stating.

But author must provide enough character background information to allow the reader to believe the kid's smart dialogue is possible.

-Derek

Birol
02-02-2008, 05:45 PM
I'm not certain how this thread is related to the Novel forum?

Jenan Mac
02-02-2008, 05:45 PM
I used big words when I was twelve. I don't know why compared to other children.


Readers often do. ::reference Terry Pratchett's description of Tiffany in Wee Free Men:: But along with knowing words, you also have to know when they're the right ones. The character doesn't have to, but the writer does.

Jenan Mac
02-02-2008, 05:48 PM
Unless they were that kid's age at least five years ago, then they shouldn't stereotype.


Isn't that a stereotype in and of itself-- "old people don't get it"?
Thing is, nobody should stereotype. It's lazy thinking.

benbradley
02-02-2008, 08:04 PM
Isn't that a stereotype in and of itself-- "old people don't get it"?
Thing is, nobody should stereotype. It's lazy thinking.
Not even despicable, lazy (fictional) characters?

Archie Bunker, he was a popular "character" and it seems he spent his whole life stereotyping.

loiterer
02-02-2008, 08:07 PM
I'm not certain how this thread is related to the Novel forum?

So I'm not the only person who wondered this.

The only question being asked in the original post is "My point is why do people have to comply to what society does". (Obviously the subject line the poster used is therefore confusing, but that's another issue.)

It seems it should belong on one of the Coffee Break forums.

BlueTexas
02-02-2008, 08:08 PM
Isn't that a stereotype in and of itself-- "old people don't get it"?
Thing is, nobody should stereotype. It's lazy thinking.

Stereotyping is more than lazy thinking - it's wrong thinking because it leads to wrong assumptions about the people who are being stereotyped.

ChaosTitan
02-02-2008, 08:08 PM
I'm not certain how this thread is related to the Novel forum?

I was wondering that myself, about twenty posts ago. ;)

And since Derek and others have already stated my position, that's all I've got.

BlueLucario
02-02-2008, 08:11 PM
If it must be moved then move it. I don't know where it should go.

Bufty
02-02-2008, 08:41 PM
Now, Bufty, ......Shhhhh.

Bubastes
02-02-2008, 08:47 PM
Itt's not me, it's that kid. There was a debate like this going on somewhere else.

I just want to prove my point. Any kid can talk in a certain way, depending on how they were raised.

And again, I ask -- why do you care so much about someone else's crit on another board? It's not your work and it's not this board, so what's the relevance? All this is diverting energy that is better spent on your own WIP.

ColoradoGuy
02-02-2008, 09:15 PM
I guess this thread makes as much sense here as anywhere else, that is if it is about how people use language and why.

Hapax Legomenon
02-02-2008, 09:25 PM
You don't have to, and you shouldn't, play up to pop cultures' expectations. Your characters will be dull, if not stereotypes. I hate it when the only black characters of a novel can all speak "street". Just cuz Jesse Jackson tried coining the word Ebonics and tried popularizing it, doesn't mean every black person speaks only in ebonics. The friends I have that happen to be black speak the same way I do, have similar vocabs as me, which isn't to say we're grammar geniuses. We just have an above-average vocab compared to "street" cred type of speak. Sometimes it may be percieved as not "normal" because of the portrayal of minorities, and young people of all kinds in general, through MTV, BET, and pop culture in general. That's how you get ignorant comments that Colin Powell and Borrack Obama "sound white". They just refuse to limit their vocabs. Your characters should do likewise when necessary.

Did anybody else flash back to that scene in Airplane with the nun? Anyone?

Anyway, I wouldn't say that the words are the only problem with this 13-year-old. I used words like that back when I was 13, but that was because I was a geeky kid who read the dictionary in my spare time. Yep. That's one way to expand your vocabulary.

If they said that vocabulary was the ONLY problem with this character, then I'd say that the critter is wrong, but I doubt that's the case. There was most likely something inherently wrong with the 13-year-old in general, but because I wasn't there, I've no right to judge. In my experience, smart people end up doing the same things as your average guy but in more... smartly ways. That's why you'll find so many blueprints for beer-fetching robots at MIT.

Birol
02-02-2008, 11:20 PM
Thanks for moving it, Chris. I was offline this morning. Everyone, remember, you're not in novels in anymore. Critical Theory and Language is a classy place; be on your best behavior.

wayndom
02-03-2008, 08:22 AM
I'm with you, BlueLucario, for a simple reason: I had a large vocabulary when I was a kid, and was told, "Nobody talks like that!" about my own word choices.

But if I were to write a story about a kid similarly "afflicted," I'd make it clear that he's different by having some character react to the fact that he doesn't speak the way most kids his age do. Your basic, "cover your ass" approach...

BlueLucario
02-03-2008, 05:33 PM
Sorry guys, for wasting your time. I feel stupid.

LaceWing
02-03-2008, 10:58 PM
I don't have the link, but: there was a study (maybe more than one) showing how some odd thing is said by A, B objects, and then speaker C sets the further tone by either agreeing or disagreeing with B. If C agrees with B, subsequent speakers tend to go with the crowd.

I don't know how the conversation/critique being discussed herein progressed, but maybe the study is pertinent.

Also, if the author is clever, he will take the objections to heart and set a scene in which the character can defend "advanced" language use to head off other readers' disbelief.

ColoradoGuy
02-03-2008, 11:05 PM
Sorry guys, for wasting your time. I feel stupid.
Don't--these are interesting issues.

DWSTXS
02-03-2008, 11:20 PM
Kid geniuses who speak like highly educated adults are annoying, but that's really how they talk.
Grandmothers who curse (like Jay Leno's The Fruitcake Lady) are funny because they shock.

There's probably a big psychological explanation of why people feel the need to have others conform, but with fiction, I think there's creating unique, memorable characters--and then there's making them believable.

I agree with Scrawler.......and I believe that young children are more apt to be precocious and talk like 'adults' than older persons are to talk like the young.

Ruv Draba
02-04-2008, 04:23 PM
any kid can behave and can talk in a certain way, depending on how they were raised. Kids are very adept at appropriating or inventing language to meet their needs. The Creole language, for instance, was actually invented by first generation kids from different cultures.

The languages that kids appropriate/invent depend on their needs and their influences. You often see that precocious children may have a large vocabulary but they only use it in limited ways - just to talk about the things that they want to talk about. E.g "Your dinner is counter-intuitive, Mum." might mean: "The stuff I thought would taste yummy, didn't, while the stuff I thought I wouldn't like, I did."

You may also find that kids over-extend their vocabulary just for convenience or experimentation - lots of kids do this - it can result in funny malapropisms.

The key thing though is that precocious kids don't just use their vocabulary to impress; they're using it to meet a need. Get the need right and you'll portray a child, no matter how you present the language. I don't agree with Scrawler that this is necessarily annoying: it just shows the workings of that child's mind. Dramatically it could be sweet, irritating, hilarious, breathtaking or very poignant.

BlueLucario
02-09-2008, 07:18 PM
Wow. Sorry guys for making this post. Now I firgured it out. Why I don't talk like "normal" kids. It's Aspergers. I hope I didn't waste anyone's time. So can you delete this thread?

Birol
02-09-2008, 07:51 PM
Blue, I've told you and other mods have told you, we do not delete threads just because the OP wishes it. This thread contains posts by other writers and discussions that may be beneficial to others besides yourself. Deleting the thread would be rude to everyone who participated and discourteous to other individuals seeking similar information.

You are free to delete your own posts, but I will not delete other people's posts because you have finished with the topic.

ColoradoGuy
02-09-2008, 08:31 PM
Wow. Sorry guys for making this post. Now I firgured it out. Why I don't talk like "normal" kids. It's Aspergers. I hope I didn't waste anyone's time. So can you delete this thread?
Besides, discussions often go off in ways that, even though not the direction originally intended by the opening poster, are useful and interesting in themselves. So never feel bad about posting your thoughts in good faith. It's the bad faith posters who cause the problems.

Jenan Mac
02-10-2008, 02:07 AM
Not even despicable, lazy (fictional) characters?

Archie Bunker, he was a popular "character" and it seems he spent his whole life stereotyping.


Touche. I was thinking in terms of writers stereotyping. And even using Archie as an example, he was a much better character when they got beyond the "bigoted blue collar white guy" thing.

Jenan Mac
02-10-2008, 02:18 AM
Wow. Sorry guys for making this post. Now I firgured it out. Why I don't talk like "normal" kids. It's Aspergers. I hope I didn't waste anyone's time. So can you delete this thread?


It's gone, I think, past being about your word choices, and onto generalties. And when discussing word choice becomes a "waste of time" for writers, it will be a sad day.
As for the Asperger's thing-- a diagnosis is a good explanation, but a lousy excuse. You're more than just your label, and all of you goes into choosing words.