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katiemac
01-22-2008, 10:06 PM
THE 2008 OSCAR NOMINEES

BEST PICTURE
Atonement
Juno
Michael Clayton
No Country for Old Men
There Will Be Blood

BEST ACTOR
George Clooney, Michael Clayton
Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood
Johnny Depp, Sweeney Todd
Tommy Lee Jones, In the Valley of Elah
Viggo Mortensen, Eastern Promises

BEST ACTRESS
Cate Blanchett, Elizabeth: The Golden Age
Julie Christie, Away From Her
Marion Cotillard, La Vie en Rose
Laura Linney, The Savages
Ellen Page, Juno

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Casey Affleck, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford
Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Charlie Wilson's War
Hal Holbrook, Into the Wild
Tom Wilkinson, Michael Clayton

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Cate Blanchett, I'm Not There
Ruby Dee, American Gangster
Saoirse Ronan, Atonement
Amy Ryan, Gone Baby Gone
Tilda Swinton, Michael Clayton

BEST DIRECTOR
Paul Thomas Anderson, There Will Be Blood
Joel and Ethan Coen, No Country for Old Men
Tony Gilroy, Michael Clayton
Jason Reitman, Juno
Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Brad Bird, Ratatouille
Diablo Cody, Juno
Tony Gilroy, Michael Clayton
Tamara Jenkins, The Savages
Nancy Oliver, Lars and the Real Girl

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Paul Thomas Anderson, There Will Be Blood
Joel Coen and Ethan Coen, No Country for Old Men
Christopher Hampton, Atonement
Ronald Harwood, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Sarah Polley, Away From Her

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
Persepolis
Ratatouille
Surf's Up

BEST ART DIRECTION
American Gangster
Atonement
The Golden Compass
Sweeney Todd
There Will Be Blood

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
The Assassination of Jesse James…
Atonement
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
No Country for Old Men
There Will Be Blood

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Across the Universe
Atonement
Elizabeth: The Golden Age
La Vie en Rose
Sweeney Todd

BEST DOCUMENTARY
No End in Sight
Operation Homecoming: Writing the Wartime Experience
Sicko
Taxi to the Dark Side
War/Dance

BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT
Freeheld
La Corona (The Crown)
Salim Baba
Sari’s Mother

BEST EDITING
The Bourne Ultimatum
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Into the Wild
No Country for Old Men
There Will Be Blood

BEST FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILM
Beaufort (Israel)
The Counterfeiters (Austria)
Katyn (Poland)
Mongol (Kazakhstan)
12 (Russia)

BEST MAKEUP
La Vie en Rose
Norbit
Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
Atonement
The Kite Runner
Michael Clayton
Ratatouille
3:10 to Yuma

BEST ORIGINAL SONG
''Falling Slowly,'' Once
''Happy Working Song,'' Enchanted
''Raise It Up,'' August Rush
''So Close,'' Enchanted
''That's How You Know,'' Enchanted

BEST SOUND EDITING
The Bourne Ultimatum
No Country for Old Men
Ratatouille
There Will Be Blood
Transformers

BEST SOUND MIXING
The Bourne Ultimatum
No Country for Old Men
Ratatouille
3:10 to Yuma
Transformers

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
The Golden Compass
Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End
Transformers

BEST ANIMATED SHORT
I Met the Walrus
Madame Tutli-Putli
Meme Les Pigeons Vont au Paradis (Even Pigeons Go to Heaven)
My Love (Moya Lyubov)
Peter & the Wolf

BEST LIVE-ACTION SHORT
At Night
Il Supplente (The Substitute)
Le Mozart des Pickpockets (The Mozart of Pickpockets)
Tanghi Argentini
The Tonto Woman

Shadow_Ferret
01-22-2008, 10:28 PM
There was a time, many years ago, when I knew something about every movie that was up for the Academy Awards. If I hadn't seen them, I'd at least read about them. I read American Film magazine and I was even good at predicting who would win.

Today?

I haven't seen any of those and probably have only heard of a handful.

This was more a commentary on where I am in my life than the state of today's film making. :)

Toothpaste
01-22-2008, 11:08 PM
While I think there are some excellent films and performances being nominated I just can't get over the Juno lovefest. Yes, I did enjoy the film and the performances, but there were, in my opinion, many flaws in the writing and directing. I think Ellen Page is a fabulous actress, and will no doubt do a performance in another film that will be well worth an oscar nomination, but this one, I dunno. All a matter of taste I am sure.

III
01-22-2008, 11:28 PM
Are we picking? I'll guess at the biggies. (Not sure I could force myself to choose between Norbit and PotC for best makeup!)

BEST PICTURE
There Will Be Blood

BEST ACTOR
Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood

BEST ACTRESS (didn't see any of these films so I'm guessing)
Cate Blanchett, Elizabeth: The Golden Age

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men (although I think Casey Affleck SHOULD win.)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Saoirse Ronan, Atonement

BEST DIRECTOR
Joel and Ethan Coen, No Country for Old Men

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Diablo Cody, Juno

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Paul Thomas Anderson, There Will Be Blood

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
Ratatouille (no brainer)

BEST ART DIRECTION
Sweeney Todd

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
There Will Be Blood

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
Transformers

maestrowork
01-23-2008, 12:40 AM
While I think there are some excellent films and performances being nominated I just can't get over the Juno lovefest. Yes, I did enjoy the film and the performances, but there were, in my opinion, many flaws in the writing and directing. I think Ellen Page is a fabulous actress, and will no doubt do a performance in another film that will be well worth an oscar nomination, but this one, I dunno. All a matter of taste I am sure.

Same here. The ga-ga over Juno is just weird. I can see why Diablo Cody gets a nod for screenplay... Ellen Page is really cute, but Best Actress? Comparing her to, say, Marion Cotillard as Edith Piaf is kind of an insult. Laura Linney is a pleasant surprise, though.


But Jason Reitman for Best Director? Some one please wake me up from this nightmare.

And there is nothing special about Michael Clayton. Best Picture? That's a joke.

katiemac
01-23-2008, 12:44 AM
I can see why Diablo Cody gets a nod for screenplay... Ellen Page is really cute, but Best Actress? Comparing her to, say, Marion Cotillard as Edith Piaf is kind of an insult. Laura Linney is a pleasant surprise, though.

Like I said before in another thread, though, there's a big lack of credible female stars and female leading roles good enough to grab a nomination. Not saying Ellen Page should win, but she did carry that film. I'm having a hard time coming up with another actress/role who could have been nominated in her place.

JoNightshade
01-23-2008, 12:46 AM
There was a time, many years ago, when I knew something about every movie that was up for the Academy Awards. If I hadn't seen them, I'd at least read about them. I read American Film magazine and I was even good at predicting who would win.

Today?

I haven't seen any of those and probably have only heard of a handful.

This was more a commentary on where I am in my life than the state of today's film making. :)

Ditto. Of that entire list, I've seen: Transformers, Pirates of the Caribbean, Ratatouille and 3:10 to Yuma.

I keep wondering if somehow I've moved out of the major movie demographic (which I assume is teenagers), but the movies I DO go to see are the ones aimed at younger audiences.

It's not that I don't enjoy adult films. It just seems that over the past few years, Hollywood has stopped producing anything that really interests me or hits me on a deeper level. Oh well.

maestrowork
01-23-2008, 12:49 AM
I have seen many of the films, and all FIVE best picture nominees. So here's my take:


THE 2008 OSCAR NOMINEES

BEST PICTURE
Atonement (should win)
Juno
Michael Clayton
No Country for Old Men (will win)
There Will Be Blood

BEST ACTOR
George Clooney, Michael Clayton
Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood (should and will win)
Johnny Depp, Sweeney Todd
Tommy Lee Jones, In the Valley of Elah
Viggo Mortensen, Eastern Promises

BEST ACTRESS
Cate Blanchett, Elizabeth: The Golden Age
Julie Christie, Away From Her (will win -- she's an Academy darling... and it's been a long time since 1965)
Marion Cotillard, La Vie en Rose (should win -- she's amazing)
Laura Linney, The Savages
Ellen Page, Juno

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Casey Affleck, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford
Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men (will win)
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Charlie Wilson's War
Hal Holbrook, Into the Wild
Tom Wilkinson, Michael Clayton (should win)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Cate Blanchett, I'm Not There (she already won with her brilliant portrayal of Katherine Hepburn)
Ruby Dee, American Gangster
Saoirse Ronan, Atonement (should win)
Amy Ryan, Gone Baby Gone
Tilda Swinton, Michael Clayton (will win)

BEST DIRECTOR
Paul Thomas Anderson, There Will Be Blood
Joel and Ethan Coen, No Country for Old Men (will and should win)
Tony Gilroy, Michael Clayton
Jason Reitman, Juno
Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Brad Bird, Ratatouille (should win)
Diablo Cody, Juno (will win)
Tony Gilroy, Michael Clayton
Tamara Jenkins, The Savages
Nancy Oliver, Lars and the Real Girl

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Paul Thomas Anderson, There Will Be Blood (unfortunately, it's really not much of an adaptation -- he only took part of the book)
Joel Coen and Ethan Coen, No Country for Old Men (will win)
Christopher Hampton, Atonement (should win -- it's a fantastic adaptation, very true to the book)
Ronald Harwood, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Sarah Polley, Away From Her

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
Persepolis
Ratatouille (will and should win)
Surf's Up

BEST ART DIRECTION
American Gangster
Atonement (will and should win)
The Golden Compass
Sweeney Todd
There Will Be Blood

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
The Assassination of Jesse James…
Atonement (will and should win)
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
No Country for Old Men
There Will Be Blood (a close second)

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Across the Universe
Atonement
Elizabeth: The Golden Age (will win)
La Vie en Rose (should win)
Sweeney Todd

BEST EDITING
The Bourne Ultimatum
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Into the Wild
No Country for Old Men (will win)
There Will Be Blood


BEST MAKEUP
La Vie en Rose (will win -- Marion Cotillard looks nothing like herself)
Norbit
Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
Atonement (will and should win)
The Kite Runner
Michael Clayton
Ratatouille
3:10 to Yuma

BEST ORIGINAL SONG
''Falling Slowly,'' Once
''Happy Working Song,'' Enchanted
''Raise It Up,'' August Rush
''So Close,'' Enchanted
''That's How You Know,'' Enchanted (will win)

BEST SOUND EDITING
The Bourne Ultimatum
No Country for Old Men
Ratatouille
There Will Be Blood (will win -- it's amazing)
Transformers

BEST SOUND MIXING
The Bourne Ultimatum
No Country for Old Men
Ratatouille
3:10 to Yuma
Transformers (will win)

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
The Golden Compass
Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End
Transformers (will win)

maestrowork
01-23-2008, 12:51 AM
Like I said before in another thread, though, there's a big lack of credible female stars and female leading roles good enough to grab a nomination. Not saying Ellen Page should win, but she did carry that film. I'm having a hard time coming up with another actress/role who could have been nominated in her place.

You're probably right. It's a race between Julie Christie and Marion Cotillard, with Cate Blanchett thrown in. They have to fill in the 4th and 5th slot with someone.

Toothpaste
01-23-2008, 12:55 AM
I think this year has been an excellent year for interesting quality movies. So I really love the list of nominations (aside from my already stated confusion about Juno). And Maestro I agree with most of your choices. But I think Persepolis may give Ratatouille a run for its money, even though I LOVE Ratatouille and think it deserves it, Persepolis, from what I understand (must see this soon!), is very original and very affecting. And considering the subject matter, very timely. 'Twill be interesting . . .

maestrowork
01-23-2008, 12:57 AM
Ditto. Of that entire list, I've seen: Transformers, Pirates of the Caribbean, Ratatouille and 3:10 to Yuma.

I keep wondering if somehow I've moved out of the major movie demographic (which I assume is teenagers), but the movies I DO go to see are the ones aimed at younger audiences.

It's not that I don't enjoy adult films. It just seems that over the past few years, Hollywood has stopped producing anything that really interests me or hits me on a deeper level. Oh well.

I would suggest you see the three top (and best reviewed films) in the Best Picture race: No Country for Old Men, There Will Be Blood, and Atonement. All are pretty deep, gorgeous films. Intelligent. Layered. And came from literary pedigree (Atonement is also about writers and writing, so there's a special interest for us writers).

III
01-23-2008, 12:59 AM
Man, I was really tracking with you Ray until you went against Norbit. That's where you lost me, buddy. I mean, you are aware that Eddie Murphy played BOTH ROLES right? They owe Norbit the best makeup Oscar to atone for leaving it out of the best picture running. Mortal. Lock.

maestrowork
01-23-2008, 01:00 AM
I think this year has been an excellent year for interesting quality movies. So I really love the list of nominations (aside from my already stated confusion about Juno). And Maestro I agree with most of your choices. But I think Persepolis may give Ratatouille a run for its money, even though I LOVE Ratatouille and think it deserves it, Persepolis, from what I understand (must see this soon!), is very original and very affecting. And considering the subject matter, very timely. 'Twill be interesting . . .

I will be looking forward to seeing it. I've been very excited about the films nominated because many are also on my personal "best" list. TWBB, No Country, Atonement, Marion Cotilard, Daniel Day-Lewis, and Ratatouille... So even though I'm puzzled by Michael Clayton and Juno, I am not really complaining.

maestrowork
01-23-2008, 01:02 AM
Man, I was really tracking with you Ray until you went against Norbit. That's where you lost me, buddy. I mean, you are aware that Eddie Murphy played BOTH ROLES right? They owe Norbit the best makeup Oscar to atone for leaving it out of the best picture running. Mortal. Lock.

Dude, fat suit makeup is so 90s. Eddie Murphy has done that time and again. But I agree, it's been robbed of the Best Picture award. Sacrilegious!

ChunkyC
01-23-2008, 01:09 AM
As it is every year, due to me living in a small town with a second-tier theatre boasting four screens, I have probably seen less than half the nominees in any of the categories. For example:

Best Picture: I've only seen Atonement and Michael Clayton
Best Actor: only Michael Clayton
Best Actress: haven't seen any of them.

It's gonna take a lot of mulling and not a little guesswork, so I won't make my predictions until I write my column the week before the awards.

III
01-23-2008, 01:14 AM
As it is every year, due to me living in a small town with a second-tier theatre boasting four screens, I have probably seen less than half the nominees in any of the categories.

You know what Sam Kinneson would say, don't you? Move to where the food is!

childeroland
01-23-2008, 01:32 AM
Here is some interesting trivia about this year's nods from moviecitynews.com. Got this off a blog's messageboard so I can't find the exact URL.

For the second year in a row, an American director has been nominated for directing a foreign-language film. Last year, Clint Eastwood was nominated for the Japanese-language Letters from Iwo Jima; this year, Julian Schnabel is nominated for the French-language The Diving Bell and the Butterfly.

The Directing nomination for Joel Coen and Ethan Coen for No Country for Old Men marks the third time two credited directors were nominated for the same film. The first was in 1961 when Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins won Oscars® for directing West Side Story. The second time was when Warren Beatty and Buck Henry were nominated for directing Heaven Can Wait (1978).

Nominations for Best Picture and Directing this year place Ethan Coen and Joel Coen in the select company of individuals who have received nominations in four different categories (not necessarily in the same year): Walt Disney, Stanley Kubrick, Warren Beatty and Kenneth Branagh. This includes the Coens’ pseudonymous Film Editing nominations as Roderick Jaynes.

With their nominations for Best Picture, Directing and Writing, and their nomination for Film Editing under the pseudonym Roderick Jaynes, Ethan Coen and Joel Coen join Warren Beatty and Alan Menken as the only individuals with four nominations for a single film. Warren Beatty accomplished that twice, with Best Picture, Directing, Leading Actor and Writing nominations for Heaven Can Wait (1978) and Reds (1981); Alan Menken received four nominations in two music categories for Beauty and the Beast (1991).

In the acting categories, nine are first-time nominees. The other ten include six previous Oscar® winners.

Marion Cotillard has been nominated for a foreign-language performance. Four performers have won Academy Awards for roles using spoken languages other than English. They are Sophia Loren (1961, Actress in Two Women), Robert De Niro (1974, Supporting Actor in The Godfather Part II), Roberto Benigni (1998, Actor in Life Is Beautiful) and Benicio Del Toro (2000, Supporting Actor in Traffic). In
addition, Marlee Matlin received the 1986 Leading Actress award for a performance almost entirely in American Sign Language. The other nominees have been Marcello Mastroianni (1962, Actor in Divorce - Italian Style; 1977, Actor in A Special Day and 1987, Actor in Dark Eyes), Sophia Loren (1964, Actress in Marriage Italian Style), Anouk Aimee (1966, Actress in A Man and a Woman), Ida Kaminska (1966, Actress in The Shop on Main Street), Liv Ullmann (1972, Actress in The Emigrants and 1976, Actress in Face to Face), Valentina Cortese (1974, Supporting Actress in Day for Night), Isabelle Adjani (1975, Actress in The Story of Adele H. and 1989, Actress in Camille Claudel), Marie-Christine Barrault (1976, Actress in Cousin, Cousine), Giancarlo Giannini (1976, Actor in Seven
Beauties), Ingrid Bergman (1978, Actress in Autumn Sonata), Max von Sydow (1988, Actor in Pelle the Conqueror), Gerard Depardieu (1990, Actor in Cyrano de Bergerac), Graham Greene (1990, Supporting Actor in Dances With Wolves), Catherine Deneuve (1992, Actress in Indochine), Massimo Troisi (1995, Actor in The Postman [Il Postino]), Fernanda Montenegro (1998, Actress in Central
Station), Catalina Sandino Moreno (2004, Actress in Maria Full of Grace), Penélope Cruz (2006, Actress in Volver), and Rinko Kikuchi (2006, Supporting Actress in Babel).

Cate Blanchett, who received her first Academy Award® nomination in 1998 for her leading role as Queen Elizabeth I in Elizabeth, is the fifth performer (and first woman) nominated for playing the same role in two different films, following Bing Crosby as Father O’Malley in Going My Way (1944) and The Bells of St. Mary’s (1945); Paul Newman as Fast Eddie Felson in The Hustler (1961) and The Color of
Money (1986); Peter O’Toole as Henry II in Becket (1964) and The Lion in Winter (1968); and Al Pacino as Michael Corleone in The Godfather (1972) and The Godfather Part II (1974). Of these, only Bing Crosby and Paul Newman won Oscars (in 1944 and 1986, respectively).

Cate Blanchett’s two acting nominations mark the eleventh time performers received nominations in both the leading and supporting categories in the same year. Previous nominees were Fay Bainter in 1938, Teresa Wright in 1942, Barry Fitzgerald in 1944, Jessica Lange in 1982, Sigourney Weaver in 1988, Al Pacino in 1992, Holly Hunter in 1993, Emma Thompson also in 1993, Julianne Moore in 2002
and Jamie Foxx in 2004. No performer has won awards in both acting categories in the same year.

Cate Blanchett is the second performer nominated for playing a member of the opposite sex. Linda Hunt won her supporting actress award for playing a male character in The Year of Living Dangerously (1983).

Roger Deakins is the first cinematographer to receive two nominations in the same year since 1971, when Robert Surtees was nominated for his work on The Last Picture Show and Summer of ’42.

The four writing nominations for screenplays for which female writers receive sole credit is a record.

Brad Bird is only the third person to have more than one nomination in the Animated Feature Film category. Like Bird, John Lasseter and Hayao Miyazaki each have accumulated two nominations in the seven-year history of the category.

Marit Allen’s nomination for Costume Design is posthumous. She died November 26, 2007.

ChunkyC
01-23-2008, 01:39 AM
You know what Sam Kinneson would say, don't you? Move to where the food is!
Nah, I like the view here (http://www.tourismcanmore.com/). (the panoramic shot was taken about a kilometre from my house)

Spiny Norman
01-23-2008, 01:55 AM
It's odd that this year three of the top films are all adapted from books. Two of which are from some of the best novelists of our time. (Sorry, Upton. Socialism is passe.)

I want to see Atonement, Michael Clayton, and There Will Be Blood (again) before I make up my mind.

No Country felt like just cinema perfection to me. I saw it four times, I think.

maestrowork
01-23-2008, 02:01 AM
It's odd that this year three of the top films are all adapted from books. Two of which are from some of the best novelists of our time. (Sorry, Upton. Socialism is passe.)

What may hurt TWBB in the screenplay race is that PTA only took part of the book, and he made up the rest. At least from what I heard, the Coen brothers stick pretty close to the book, and I know for a fact that Hampton did Ian McEwan's book justice (and the novel was even deemed unfilmmable by many, so it's very impressive).

III
01-23-2008, 02:20 AM
Nah, I like the view here (http://www.tourismcanmore.com/). (the panoramic shot was taken about a kilometre from my house)

What the heck is a kilometre?I kid because I love.

maestrowork
01-23-2008, 02:25 AM
It's the distance between your brain and a clue.

III
01-23-2008, 02:27 AM
Your face has a clue

maestrowork
01-23-2008, 02:29 AM
Your face has glue.

I drink your milkshake!

Spiny Norman
01-23-2008, 02:49 AM
That's true concerning TWBB.

Then again, No Country was basically all dialogue anyways, so there wasn't much to really adapt, even.

maestrowork
01-23-2008, 02:55 AM
That's true concerning TWBB.

Then again, No Country was basically all dialogue anyways, so there wasn't much to really adapt, even.

I haven't read the book so I don't know. But Atonement is impressive because Hampton was able to turn the introspective nature of the narrative into sequences that actually reveal characters cinematically. I think that takes great skills, considering how difficult it is to adapt a book into a coherent screenplay to begin with.

Obviously, Best Picture relies more than just the screenplay. But as writers, I think we know how important the writing is for any film that is worth its salt.

eldragon
01-23-2008, 03:03 AM
No Tim Burton?

My ten-year-old daughter, his number one fan, will be majorly disapointed.

maxmordon
01-23-2008, 07:11 AM
In moments like this, when I notice that I live on the third world (the only movies that have premiered here on that list are the ones produced by Disney)

blacbird
01-24-2008, 12:35 PM
I am seriously pissed off at Chris Cooper not getting a nomination for Best Actor, in Breach. It is a perfect example of a movie released early in the Oscar year and being forgotten, which is why so many studios hold off their major Oscar-hopeful releases until late in the year. Why Cooper hasn't got a statue yet is beyond me. He is simply one of the finest motion picture actors around, and has been for quite a while now.

caw

John Paton
01-24-2008, 01:03 PM
I agree with all of Maestro's picks apart from Tilda Swinton.

And the Oscar goes to ...... Saoirse Ronan - Awe struck I was ;)

John Paton
01-24-2008, 01:07 PM
I am seriously pissed off at Chris Cooper not getting a nomination for Best Actor, in Breach.

He is simply one of the finest motion picture actors around, and has been for quite a while now.

caw

Are you serious?? Give me a break will you!!

He couldn't act his way out of a wet paper bag.

Oh wait - Ah Sheesh. I thought you meant Gary Cooper. The first guy to win an Oscar for saying "Yup!"

Yeah Chris has had some bad luck but with the right role and Director he should get something soon. ;)

PinkUnicorn
01-24-2008, 01:37 PM
as long as Johnny Depp (Sweeney Todd) wins everything, I don't care about the rest ;) :)

maestrowork
01-24-2008, 07:14 PM
I agree with all of Maestro's picks apart from Tilda Swinton.

And the Oscar goes to ...... Saoirse Ronan - Awe struck I was ;)

Well, I really hope she will win, but my brain tells me probably not.

maestrowork
01-24-2008, 07:19 PM
I am seriously pissed off at Chris Cooper not getting a nomination for Best Actor, in Breach. It is a perfect example of a movie released early in the Oscar year and being forgotten, which is why so many studios hold off their major Oscar-hopeful releases until late in the year. Why Cooper hasn't got a statue yet is beyond me. He is simply one of the finest motion picture actors around, and has been for quite a while now.

caw

While I agree with you that Chris Cooper was excellent in it -- there are just too many great performances this year and unfortunately, Cooper didn't make the cut (or maybe his publicist didn't push enough). His role wasn't showy enough. Also, I don't think it's because the movie came out earlier -- I think it's about whether people are still talking about you after 10 months. Both Away from Her and La Vie en Rose came out earlier last year, but people have been talking about Julie Christie and Marion Cotillard all year long (even though the films are small art-house films). There's been a lot of grass-root effort and admiration for the actresses. Granted, the actress race is usually less fierce than the actor race. I think Chris Cooper just didn't stand out this year among all the great performances.

Will Lavender
01-24-2008, 07:20 PM
I am seriously pissed off at Chris Cooper not getting a nomination for Best Actor, in Breach. It is a perfect example of a movie released early in the Oscar year and being forgotten, which is why so many studios hold off their major Oscar-hopeful releases until late in the year. Why Cooper hasn't got a statue yet is beyond me. He is simply one of the finest motion picture actors around, and has been for quite a while now.

caw

I agree.

Genre films -- including comedies -- seem to be widely shunned by the Academy year after year.

maestrowork
01-24-2008, 07:25 PM
I agree.

Genre films -- including comedies -- seem to be widely shunned by the Academy year after year.

And yet both Little Miss Sunshine and Juno were nominated for best picture (and Ellen Page best actress). I don't think there's a bias against genres. Mystic River, for example, is a genre. No Country for Old Men technically is a genre. Sweeney Todd is a musical and Johnny Depp got a nomination. So I don't think it has anything to do with genre vs. mainstream.

Will Lavender
01-24-2008, 07:34 PM
And yet both Little Miss Sunshine and Juno were nominated for best picture (and Ellen Page best actress). I don't think there's a bias against genres. Mystic River, for example, is a genre. No Country for Old Men technically is a genre. Sweeney Todd is a musical and Johnny Depp got a nomination. So I don't think it has anything to do with genre vs. mainstream.

Point noted.

I still contend that if you go back twenty years and look at what's nominated, thrillers and comedies get frighteningly few nominations. And while LMS and Juno are definitely comedies, they are so off-beat that they slip between genres. I don't know if I've ever seen a straight-up comedy (a la Knocked-Up) get a nomination in my lifetime.

III
01-24-2008, 07:40 PM
And yet both Little Miss Sunshine and Juno were nominated for best picture

But I think that goes to Blacbird's point - it's because they were released right before the Oscars. You can't tell me anyone is going to be talking about Juno 10 months from now (althought LMS probably had more staying power). And weren't you complaining to me via PM that Norbit wasn't nominated for best picture?

maestrowork
01-24-2008, 07:46 PM
Point noted.

I still contend that if you go back twenty years and look at what's nominated, thrillers and comedies get frighteningly few nominations. And while LMS and Juno are definitely comedies, they are so off-beat that they slip between genres. I don't know if I've ever seen a straight-up comedy (a la Knocked-Up) get a nomination in my lifetime.

I would have liked to see Knocked Up being nominated for best picture. But yes, the Oscars are always about "excellence" in filmmaking and not popularity (leave those to the MTV and People's Choice awards). And for some reason, they don't consider comedies like Knocked Up "quality filmmaking." Comedies like LMS or Juno actually cross over to drama... still, you hear people complaining about them for not being "deep and special" enough to be best pictures. There is certainly biases against light and fluffy. LMS and Juno tackles some series social issues and that sets them apart (but I'd argue that Knocked Up tackles some serious social issues as well). But for best pictures, I think people want deep and profound, not just entertaining.

And Silence of the Lambs won Best Picture despite being genre (and not to mention Lord of the Rings). But comedies do get it rough. I can't remember what's the last time a comedy won (although Chicago won as a musical -- and sort of a comedy/drama).



And weren't you complaining to me via PM that Norbit wasn't nominated for best picture?

I was complaining that Eddie Murphy didn't get a Best Actress nomination. There's no justice!!!

Will Lavender
01-24-2008, 07:53 PM
But for best pictures, I think people want deep and profound, not just entertaining.

It's an interesting debate.

And I would say up front that the real issue is that genre films are sometimes poorly made and poorly acted. They pander to a certain kind of film viewer, and because of this they can feel (and often are) overly stylized or unoriginal or both.

But there are films that transcend their genre, and these are often disregarded by the Academy. Reminds me of the National Book Awards the year when Tom Wolfe's A Man in Full was nominated. John Updike and others said it was "too entertaining," and that it didn't deserve to win.

I've always believed, like Graham Greene often said, that entertainment can be profound.

maestrowork
01-24-2008, 07:58 PM
I've always believed, like Graham Greene often said, that entertainment can be profound.

Of course, and that's why films like Silence of the Lambs or Gladiator could win best picture because they're entertaining yet profound. They're not mutually exclusive. If No Country for Old Men wins, it will also be a case of "entertaining yet profound."

Toothpaste
01-24-2008, 08:05 PM
I also think this bias will show in the Best Actor category. While granted there are many fine actors (and DDL will take the oscar), the tour de force performance Johnny Depp did in Sweeney Todd is amazing. Not only just technique wise, I mean dude, the guy's never sung that much in his life, but also the subtle and nuanced performance both he and Helena (who was snubbed in my opinion) gave to a very over the top kind of film was lovely. But because his was a performance in a gothic musical (not a serious drama), there is simply no way anyone will be giving him the award. Just like no one was going to award his performance as Jack Sparrow, despite the fact that it was that performance that single handedly created an entire franchise. And was extremely original and risky. To me breaking down in tears on film is so passe, ;).

But it's like one of my acting coaches says. The Oscars are just silly because how can you decide between actors who have been in very different films, have had to stretch very different muscles and had to play very different characters. It's very much like comparing apples to oranges.

III
01-24-2008, 08:16 PM
To me breaking down in tears on film is so passe, ;).


True, but did you see DDL in TWBB? I thought his best moments were when you'd see the anger possess him and change his countenance until he looked like a completely different person. The scene on the beach with his brother - man, I wanted to crawl under my seat to get away from the darkness that he radiated, and he didn't even move a muscle. It reminded me of Edward Norton's emoting prowess in American History X.

maestrowork
01-24-2008, 08:44 PM
The Academy, however, does seem to prefer over-the-top showy performances over nuanced ones, however. I'll bet the clip they submit for DDL would be his "I drink your milkshake" scene or the baptism scene, instead of his more quiet, stoic moments (such as the contemplative scenes on the beach) which affected me equally or more.

katiemac
01-25-2008, 10:31 PM
Of course, and that's why films like Silence of the Lambs or Gladiator could win best picture because they're entertaining yet profound. They're not mutually exclusive. If No Country for Old Men wins, it will also be a case of "entertaining yet profound."

I think this has changed, though, over the past 20 years. Both The Fugitive and Raiders of the Lost Ark were nominated for Best Picture in their respective years. Neither won, but I'm not sure I would call either of those films profound. But the fact pictures like these aren't getting nominated (do they even make films like these anymore?! And Indy 4 doesn't count) shows the Academy's tastes have shifted, if ever so slightly.

maestrowork
01-25-2008, 10:39 PM
Maybe... if Bourne Ultimatum had been nominated for best picture, though, I'd think that theory would go out the door. Alas! It wasn't.

maestrowork
01-26-2008, 01:55 AM
Here's my personal "objective" (and not so objective) assessment based on what I know about excellence in films (i.e. take it with a grain of salt):


Atonement
pros: scrumptious, epic, heart-wrenching drama that is both smart and sentimental. Everything works well together: the script, the direction, the acting, the editing, the score, the cinematography, the costume, the set, the art, the production... sucker punch of an ending. Only epic love story in the mix.

cons: arguably slow and apparently plotless in the middle. The romance part is not as developed as expected, and may distract from the real story

fluff factor: Times seen: 2 Will I see it again? Definitely


Juno
pros: witty dialogue with quirky, highly likable characters. Tackles serious social issues with a wink and a nudge. Excellent acting from leads. Cool soundtrack. The only feel-good movie in the mix.

cons: straight-forward, no thrill plot. Characters are slightly caricatures. Plain direction. "Indie" production value. Feels "light and fluffy." Not edgy enough as in indie favorite.

Times seen: 1 Will I see it again? Probably.


Michael Clayton
pros: taut execution. Good acting all around especially from supporting actors. Good production value. George Clooney. Only legal thriller/drama in the mix.

cons: straight-forward legal thriller. Simply nothing special about the production. George Clooney.

Times seen: 1 Will I see it again? Probably not.



No Country for Old Men
pros: stunning narrative and atmosphere. Great acting all around especially from Tommy Lee Jones, Josh Brolin and Javier Bardem. Great direction. Taut use of action, dialogue and silence. Unique take on "modern western." Thought-provoking.

cons: relentless violence. Moral ambiguity. A questionable and arguably disappointing ending. Not the only "western" in the mix.

Times seen: 1 Will I see it again? Probably.



There Will Be Blood
pros: stunning cinematography. Mesmerizing acting from Daniel Day-Lewis. Impressive score. Unique story and narrative. Kubrick-esque absurdity. Great ending.

cons: lack of strong supporting characters. Meandering middle. Moral ambiguity. Not the only western in the mix.

Times seen: 1 Will I see it again? Definitely.