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AnneMarble
01-20-2008, 10:57 AM
Who says scientists don't have a sense of humor? This (http://www.jbc.org/content/vol0/issue2007/images/data/M706127200/DC1/Supermouse_Video_-_Official_(Windows).wmv) is the video some biochemists put together as supplemental data for one of their studies. It's even set to music! :)

It's a few megabytes long, so if you have dialup, download it instead of playing it from the site. But it's not so long that you'll never be able to download it.

BTW I also love the cover illustration for this article (http://www.jbc.org/content/vol282/issue45/cover.shtml). This is a very unusual illustration for this journal. ;) Cover illustrations are usually scientific thingies such as crystal structures of proteins, images showing green fluorescent protein (those can be gorgeous!), or photographs of cells, not super mice with flowing capes. :tongue

JoNightshade
01-20-2008, 11:27 AM
Okay, was that mouse running for FOUR HOURS? What on earth was he trying to GET?

Arguably, "wild mouse" was the smarter one for giving up when he realized the goal was unattainable... :)

Perks
01-20-2008, 06:06 PM
Yay for the science guys! They gave a mouse brain damage so that he'll run for four hours for absolutely no reason. Where can I get me some of that?

AnneMarble
01-20-2008, 07:05 PM
Yay for the science guys! They gave a mouse brain damage so that he'll run for four hours for absolutely no reason. Where can I get me some of that?
They're actually a mutant (although they are transgenic, meaning they were created that way). Maybe they should have made them wear yellow Spandex costumes? Their metabolism was changed somehow, and they had a longer life span. Oh, and they can eat more than other mice yet still stay in shape. You can read more in Science News (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071101162739.htm).

ETA:
Oh, and there's more here from the NPR (http://www.npr.org/blogs/news/2007/11/super_mouse_can_run_for_almost.html).

And David Brin blogged about it in this post (http://davidbrin.blogspot.com/2007/11/techno-misc.html). He has some interesting comments about how mutations like this have probably occurred in the wild during times of plenty but then were useless during leaner times.