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jordijoy
01-12-2008, 01:30 AM
A fun email I received the other day....

Cna yuo raed tihs? Olny 55 plepoe out of 100 can.


i cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid, aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it dseno't mtaetr in waht oerdr the ltteres in a wrod are, the olny iproamtnt tihng is taht the frsit and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it whotuit a pboerlm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Azanmig huh? yaeh and I awlyas tghuhot slpeling was ipmorantt!

juneafternoon
01-12-2008, 01:33 AM
Haha I saw this about two or three years ago on some message boards. Petrey dran ispemirvse, eh? :)

JustGo
01-12-2008, 02:07 AM
I love that :D
I'd also bet that at least 95% of the people who traffic this site can understand it, but we'll see.

FennelGiraffe
01-12-2008, 03:16 AM
There's an analysis of it here (http://www.mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk/%7Emattd/Cmabrigde/). It's actually been contrived to make it quite easy to read.

First, the requirement that the first and last letters stay the same (violated by "cna yuo" in the header) means words with one, two, or three letters aren't altered at all. There are 108 words total--49 of them have three or fewer letters. Four-letter words have only one possible change--transposition of the second and third letters--which is easy to decode. That accounts for another 20 words--bringing the count of easy words to 69, nearly two-thirds of the total. Given that much, some of the longer words are predictable from context.

Second, none of the scrambled words create a correct spelling of a different word, such as from/form or salt/slat.

Third, many of the changes in the longer words are transpositions of pairs of adjacent letters, which is easier to decode than when a letter is moved several spaces away from its correct position.

Shweta
01-12-2008, 03:21 AM
Beat me to it, Giraffe lady :)

Also, another fun, somewhat different, example of figuring out words in a sentence:


This sentence contains several nonsklarkish English flutzpahs, but the overall fluggandisp can be glorked from context.

Originally Douglas Hofstadter, I believe.

JustGo
01-12-2008, 05:36 AM
Curse you people and your ruining perfectly good pseudo-science with logic!

:tongue

LeeFlower
01-12-2008, 08:44 AM
Thanks for the link, Fennel.

I thought there was something fishy about this when it was going around a few years ago, because I'm dyslexic, and I can read it. Dyslexics, unlike most people, don't code whole words instead of individual letters. Every time I read a word, I'm essentially sounding it out in my head (this makes for very slow reading, but I choose to see it as making good books last longer :D). So the fact that I had only a little bit of trouble reading it told me that it had to be designed to be crazy-easy.

benbradley
01-12-2008, 09:07 AM
HERE's a Google search result I thought I'd never see in my lifetime until about four years ago when that thing made the rounds:

Results 1 - 10 of about 147,000 for phaonmneal
Can you imagine that same misspelling being used that many times?

It was one of the most popularly copied blogposts and forwarded email messages of its time, along with the "You know the world is crazy when the world's best rapper is white, the world's best golfer is black,..." thing documented here:
http://www.snopes.com/quotes/chrisrock.asp

PinkUnicorn
01-23-2008, 12:00 PM
sad thing is, up until 2 years ago, my writing (and typing) actually looked like that, cause I have dyslexia.

I have no problem reading it, plus I can read mirror image words and upsidedown books as well.

I can't do numbers at all though: do not ask me the time, if I say 1:15 it's 1:45 or maybe 4:15 or 5:45. I can count in my head, but give me actual numbers to count, I'm lost, and I can not do any form of math at all.

KTC
01-23-2008, 04:07 PM
This is not novel forum fodder. My eyes! My eyes! Port to OP.

Willowmound
01-23-2008, 04:49 PM
Old nwes, siltl fnuny...

Shadow_Ferret
01-23-2008, 05:01 PM
Petrey dran ispemirvse, eh? :)
See, now if the claim was true, then this should have been as easy to read as the whole paragraph was. It wasn't. I struggled with dran and came up with drain, then maybe damn (now after typing it I realized it's darn) and I couldn't get ispemirvse at all except in context.

Willowmound
01-23-2008, 05:19 PM
See, now if the claim was true, then this should have been as easy to read as the whole paragraph was. It wasn't. I struggled with dran and came up with drain, then maybe damn (now after typing it I realized it's darn) and I couldn't get ispemirvse at all except in context.


The OP says only 55% can do it. I thought it would have been higher, but anyhoo. I could read it fine.

HeronW
01-23-2008, 05:40 PM
That's 55% of non-writers! AW folks rank MUCH higher!

KTC
01-23-2008, 05:43 PM
Thanking you.

DamaNegra
01-24-2008, 12:48 AM
See, now if the claim was true, then this should have been as easy to read as the whole paragraph was. It wasn't. I struggled with dran and came up with drain, then maybe damn (now after typing it I realized it's darn) and I couldn't get ispemirvse at all except in context.
Weird, I had no trouble at all reading that sentence, and English's not even my maternal language!

mscelina
01-24-2008, 12:52 AM
I got line edits yesterday on book # 3. Imagine my horror when, on page 3, I misspelled my main character's name. Damn.