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small axe
01-11-2008, 04:31 AM
Well, if you read the old classic Science Fiction tales, in the distant future either the Moon has wandered out of orbit or has crashed into the Earth, so there's no Moon in the sky.

But the other night on History Channel, the science-daddy said that the Moon won't escape Earth's gravity for 50 billion years ... and obviously by then the Sun itself will have consumed both Earth and Moon (in about 5-10 billion years)

Did I hear that right? Because damn, I loved the idea of a lost Moon. Bit by bit, piece by piece ... they're robbing the Future of every last shred of glamour!

brokenfingers
01-11-2008, 04:39 AM
Well, you have to consider that these are the same people who predicted flying cars by the end of the century...

Albedo
01-11-2008, 04:39 AM
I'm sure the moon can still be made to fall out of the sky with the right assistance.

truelyana
01-11-2008, 04:42 AM
The moons not going anywhere, not until the earth vanishes anyway.

Shadow_Ferret
01-11-2008, 04:52 AM
Well, you have to consider that these are the same people who predicted flying cars by the end of the century...The end of the LAST century. I fully expected to be driving one of those buggers by now.

Albedo
01-11-2008, 05:00 AM
Flying cars were always the most ridiculous thing. Imagine the drivers on the roads all around you today. It doesn't matter where you live. Would you really want those people piloting tonnes of steel in three dimensions instead of just two? At least now I'm safe from idiot drivers on the upper floors of buildings.

truelyana
01-11-2008, 05:02 AM
Well, you have to consider that these are the same people who predicted flying cars by the end of the century...

I believe some already exist, not in this end of the world though.

merper
01-11-2008, 08:51 AM
Science is good at predicting physical phenomena like this moon thing, not so much the rate of human progress. Flying cars really need an advanced autonavigation system to be integrated into mainstream life. Now that tech is starting to arrive:

http://www.engadget.com/2005/08/27/gm-will-launch-self-driving-car-in-2008/

The next step is to find an alternate fuel source. Friction takes enough gallons per mile to overcome as is. If you want to lift the car up and down? Not gonna happen on oil.

small axe
01-11-2008, 11:58 AM
And if you watch the old movies about the Supercomputer that takes over the world etc ... an advanced computer is VERY BIG, with MANY FLASHING LIGHTS. And countless reels of magnetic tape spinning as the computer talks.

The computers should go tiny and personal, that was fantasy!

On the other hand, you watch SOYLENT GREEN and it's like ... what, they knew about the Greenhouse Effect etc THAT LONG AGO?

And we're still debating it and doing nothing about it TODAY? yeeesh

scottVee
01-11-2008, 01:48 PM
Space:1999 said it all.

Dulvarian_Eldritch
01-19-2008, 11:05 AM
Google "flying car" and hit "I'm feeling lucky".
Flying car that may or may not ever go into production, but it looks cool.

Gillhoughly
05-05-2008, 08:21 PM
The Aptera (http://www.aptera.com/)doesn't fly, but it's close enough for me! I'm saving for the hybrid model. This beauty is a geek's wet dream!

They're supposed to use it in the next Trek film.

And the Popular Mechanics (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7YPTWWxQUGc) video report is quite fun.

http://oneworldnews.files.wordpress.com/2007/10/aptera1.jpg

ReneC
05-08-2008, 11:30 PM
Google "flying car" and hit "I'm feeling lucky".
Flying car that may or may not ever go into production, but it looks cool.


I've known about the Moller flying car since 1995 and I'm still waiting to see them in action. Legislation and public safety are the largest hurdles any flying car will have to get over before mass production can begin. Best if we just hook the damn things up to Google Earth and let the computer do the flying anyway. People scare me.

As for the moon, I'm sure a fair-sized chunk of rock could pulverize it for us. Maybe the moon will save the planet by taking one for the team. Of course, life on Earth without the moon could be pretty hairy.

Pthom
05-08-2008, 11:45 PM
As for the moon, I'm sure a fair-sized chunk of rock could pulverize it for us. Maybe the moon will save the planet by taking one for the team. Of course, life on Earth without the moon could be pretty hairy.The discussion in this thread (http://absolutewrite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=53319) may be of interest.

Bartholomew
05-14-2008, 09:51 AM
Well, you have to consider that these are the same people who predicted flying cars by the end of the century...

What do you call a helicopter? o_o

JimmyB27
05-14-2008, 01:39 PM
What do you call a helicopter? o_o
Uhh...I call it a helicopter. Why, what do you call it?

Nivarion
11-04-2008, 09:24 AM
yea, really big rock+moon equals dust, or a massively large moon that we orbit around... OH I JUST HAD AN IDEA FOR A STORY.

the moon due to having saved the earth from a large asteroid, has doubled in mass. but it increased so much that the earth now orbits the earth, and it drawing its atmosphere off. making the earth slowly uninhabitable.
not the spot i know but, where they hit they hit.

lpetrich
11-05-2008, 08:26 PM
And if you watch the old movies about the Supercomputer that takes over the world etc ... an advanced computer is VERY BIG, with MANY FLASHING LIGHTS. And countless reels of magnetic tape spinning as the computer talks.
That's because it's visually interesting. A box that sits there and seemingly does nothing would not be.

In any case, it would take something very unusual to make the Moon wander away, like some other planet passing nearby. And crashing into the Earth would be even more improbable.

dclary
11-05-2008, 09:11 PM
Can we at least have the "cracked in half" moon of Thundarr the Barbarian?

dpaterso
11-05-2008, 09:25 PM
NASA to Strike the Moon with a Double Sledgehammer (http://www.infoniac.com/hi-tech/nasa-strike-moon-with-double-sledgehammer.html)!!!

-Derek

Revelationz
11-17-2008, 03:09 PM
Here's something no one has considered pertaining to the whole moon thing.

Okay, in 50 billion years itll be lost because there isn't enough gravitational attraction between the Earth and Moon.

But, the Earth's mass is constantly increasing with falling meteors and comets etc. What if in a billion years the Earth has enough mass to start pulling the moon back towards it?

Just an idea.

Julie Worth
11-17-2008, 04:15 PM
Okay, in 50 billion years itll be lost because there isn't enough gravitational attraction between the Earth and Moon.

But, the Earth's mass is constantly increasing with falling meteors and comets etc. What if in a billion years the Earth has enough mass to start pulling the moon back towards it?


Gravity doesn't change, and the mass of the earth doesn't change much either (about a million tons a day, which is nothing, less than one percent of the earth's mass in a hundred trillion years). The moon's orbit is steadily increasing due to tidal interaction with the earth--the earth loses angular momentum and the moon gains exactly what the earth loses. A few billion years from now this exchange will stop. By then a month will be 47 days or so (and with this synchronous rotation, a "day" will also be 47 days). If there are still any oceans, the earth's rotation will continue to slow due to solar tides, and the moon will start moving closer again, giving angular momentum back to the earth. Probably before that happens, the sun will boil up into a red giant and swallow the earth and moon, putting an end to this little dance. Some think there's a slight chance the earth might escape, but it won't matter much, with no atmosphere, no oceans, and a surface of molten lava.

MelancholyMan
11-17-2008, 11:11 PM
I'm sure the moon can still be made to fall out of the sky with the right assistance.

Didn't you ever see Space 1999?

Are we behind or what?

MelancholyMan
11-17-2008, 11:13 PM
Can we at least have the "cracked in half" moon of Thundarr the Barbarian?

Me thinks the moon's gravity might have something to say about that.

Thundarr, right there with the Princess Ariel and Ookla the Mock who rode around on that mutated horse thingy. That's going way back.

dclary
11-18-2008, 10:02 AM
Gravity doesn't change, and the mass of the earth doesn't change much either (about a million tons a day, which is nothing, less than one percent of the earth's mass in a hundred trillion years). The moon's orbit is steadily increasing due to tidal interaction with the earth--the earth loses angular momentum and the moon gains exactly what the earth loses. A few billion years from now this exchange will stop. By then a month will be 47 days or so (and with this synchronous rotation, a "day" will also be 47 days). If there are still any oceans, the earth's rotation will continue to slow due to solar tides, and the moon will start moving closer again, giving angular momentum back to the earth. Probably before that happens, the sun will boil up into a red giant and swallow the earth and moon, putting an end to this little dance. Some think there's a slight chance the earth might escape, but it won't matter much, with no atmosphere, no oceans, and a surface of molten lava.

I'm moving the day before that.

Revelationz
11-23-2008, 07:07 AM
Julie Worth saud:
Gravity doesn't change, and the mass of the earth doesn't change much either (about a million tons a day, which is nothing, less than one percent of the earth's mass in a hundred trillion years).

Mass and energy cause gravitational pulls. Their presence in space-time warps it. If the earth's mass increases a million tons a day, then the earth's gravititational pull increases. Of course, it is extremely small. I wasn't trying to be literal as to say that I know that in exactly 50 billion years the grav pull of the earth will draw the moon inward. It was just an idea without knowledge of how much the earth's mass increases daily, yearly, etc.