PDA

View Full Version : Somewhere, Out There.



Bartholomew
01-07-2008, 02:22 PM
Beautiful singing. Thought I'd share it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTIU2IclU6o&feature=related

Fast forward to 1:54 - unless you speak Chinese. (I know a little, but not enough to offer any sort of realistic translation.)

The song is "Somewhere, out there," in English. :)

Maryn
01-07-2008, 05:29 PM
You gotta love a clear soprano without operatic tendencies. (No offense to opera lovers, but I'm not a vibrato fan.) She also had pretty good mastery of pronunciation, considering that this clearly isn't a language she speaks.

Although I think I still prefer the Linda Ronstadt-Peabo Bryson version, this was very good, and her voice genuinely pretty. I'm quite content knowing this is the song that'll be stuck in my head much of the day.

Maryn, sucker for ballads

maestrowork
01-07-2008, 09:09 PM
Beautiful singing. Thought I'd share it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTIU2IclU6o&feature=related

Fast forward to 1:54 - unless you speak Chinese. (I know a little, but not enough to offer any sort of realistic translation.)

The song is "Somewhere, out there," in English. :)

Chinese translation: basically they're saying the children who sang the song have that natural quality of voice, and she really appreciate that. She said there were two versions in the movie -- one sung in the kid's voice and the other the pop version by Linda Ronstadt, and she wants to learn to sing it both ways....

Anyway, she has a good voice, much better than a lot of Chinese pop stars I was forced to listen to when I was in LA (many Chinese pop singers can't sing!) But her rendition is still a bit too Karaoke for me. Would love to see her sing to a full orchestra.

Bartholomew
01-08-2008, 12:45 AM
Chinese translation: basically they're saying the children who sang the song have that natural quality of voice, and she really appreciate that. She said there were two versions in the movie -- one sung in the kid's voice and the other the pop version by Linda Ronstadt, and she wants to learn to sing it both ways....

Anyway, she has a good voice, much better than a lot of Chinese pop stars I was forced to listen to when I was in LA (many Chinese pop singers can't sing!) But her rendition is still a bit too Karaoke for me. Would love to see her sing to a full orchestra.

Any idea who she is? I'd love to hear more of her stuff, but I have no way of looking her up.

Bartholomew
01-08-2008, 12:49 AM
You gotta love a clear soprano without operatic tendencies. (No offense to opera lovers, but I'm not a vibrato fan.) She also had pretty good mastery of pronunciation, considering that this clearly isn't a language she speaks.

Although I think I still prefer the Linda Ronstadt-Peabo Bryson version, this was very good, and her voice genuinely pretty. I'm quite content knowing this is the song that'll be stuck in my head much of the day.

Maryn, sucker for ballads

I LOVE Opera, and I wish more singers would cut down on the vibrato too. Its hard enough to understand them without them sending the vowels up and down both ends of the audible spectrum. I went to an opera a few weeks back, and about ten minutes in, I realized they were singing in English. I still couldn't understand them. It made me wonder how well Italians can actually understand opera singers. :)

Maryn
01-08-2008, 01:45 AM
I've never seen this, but I've heard that at least at some opera houses, the English translation (or just the English, for an opera in English) appears on some sort of electronic ticker-like screen above the stage. That would sure help me.

Maryn, who always struggles with lyrics

JoNightshade
01-08-2008, 01:55 AM
I'm pretty sure this girl can speak English as well, or she's had some really extensive coaching. Even singing, English doesn't sound the same from someone who doesn't speak the language well.

I think she has a nice voice, but honestly she didn't move me. And this is one of the three songs I know of that will instantly make me cry. She sang technically well, but I didn't "feel" it. I'm reminded of the advice Itzak Perlman gives to (most of) his master-class students - it's not just about hitting the notes well, it's about understanding the song. The reason it makes me cry is because it's about that intense longing for something out of your reach. I didn't feel like she understood that.

maestrowork
01-08-2008, 02:40 AM
I've never seen this, but I've heard that at least at some opera houses, the English translation (or just the English, for an opera in English) appears on some sort of electronic ticker-like screen above the stage. That would sure help me.

Maryn, who always struggles with lyrics

They did that for the Broadway production of La Boheme -- it was very subtle and didn't distract from everything that was going on on stage. Of course, I was insanely jealous of all these 20-something having such marvelous voices. Life isn't fair.

JoNightshade
01-08-2008, 02:57 AM
I saw a version of the Coronation of Poppea with English "supertitles." It was fantastic. They even used it to add an extra layer of meaning to the opera by supplying historic information that the listeners at the time of composition would have understood implicitly.

I think I also saw it on... oh shoot. What's that experimental opera about the dude in the crazy house? The music is on a different scale so it sounds horrific.