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View Full Version : Is it OK to send a thank you when you receive a really nice rejection letter?



Kate StAmour
03-06-2005, 09:24 PM
Recently, I received a rejection that actually made me want to work harder and submit to the company it was so darned nice. Is it OK to send a thank you? Here is an excerpt of the rejection:

Thanks so much for sending us THE DOCTOR IS IN.
Although your story is well written and highly erotic, I'm sorry to say we won't be asking to acquire it. Right now we're searching for stories that possess the romantic and erotic in equal measure, with a great deal of emphasis on building sexual tension.
If you'd like to send us other samples of your work that meet the above criteria, I'd love to see them. I'm particularly happy to note your interest in Wicca, and wonder if you might have a story involving Wiccan beliefs and practices that might also meet our romance/erotica criteria.
I wish you all the best with your writing.

Isn't that nice? I just love feedback!

Kate

maestrowork
03-06-2005, 09:57 PM
Go ahead, it won't hurt. Besides, you may submit to that publisher again, since they did invite you to...

Maryn
03-06-2005, 10:51 PM
I bet publishers aren't immune to sincere compliments. Tell them what your first sentence told us--and get to work on that Wicca story!

Maryn

veinglory
03-07-2005, 03:17 PM
Personally I would write a story that fits their needs as described and attach the thank you letter as part as the new submission cover letter. Also address the letter by name to the person who wrote the first rejection letter and comments. Then you get to thank them and turn it to your advantage ;)

captivatex
03-08-2005, 06:55 PM
Recently, I received a rejection that actually made me want to work harder and submit to the company it was so darned nice. Is it OK to send a thank you?


Kate, as a publisher I can tell you it is ALWAYS nice to hear thank you's, whether for acceptances or rejections. And I do try my very best to make rejections as easy as possible for the author to take. It's only fair...

Courtesy costs nothing!


Captivatex
Owner/Founder Logical Lust Publications
www.logical-lust.com (http://www.logical-lust.com)
www.eternallyerotic.com (http://www.eternallyerotic.com)

Sheryl Nantus
03-12-2005, 07:13 PM
I think it's just darned polite to send a nice note.

and there ain't enough courtesy in the world nowadays, so why not spread some around?

;)

Lena Matthews
03-24-2005, 06:11 AM
I did, but what i've really been wanting to do is to send them the reviews and fan letters to show them that although they thought my character was too flighty, other people got it. Yes I'm really that petty. lol :banana:



Lena

mommie4a
03-24-2005, 07:08 AM
I almost always send thank yous for the responses, even if rejections. I've even gotten a couple of replies to the thank yous! Never hurts you, and it might be remembered. In fact, sometimes what I've done is put the thank you in the subject line saying in parens, (no need to respond, just saying thanks), so they don't even have to bother to open it, since it's just a message from me saying, thanks for taking the time. Good manners, I think.

jdkiggins
03-24-2005, 08:33 AM
I agree. I have sent thank you notes and e-mails. It's good policy to be polite, editors very seldom hear anything but rants, so a nice thank you may help them remember you the next time you send an article to them.

Rose
03-24-2005, 09:18 AM
Upon receipt of my first handwritten rejection, I emailed the editor thanking him for the personal reply. Hey, the email address was right there on the letterhead. Anyway, we e-corresponded a bit, and a month later I had an assignment!

Apology to grammar/style purists: I just prefer the looks/pinky-sparing quality of email over e-mail, but "e-" words that I make up require the hyphen (per some set of "rules" in my demented little head).

jdkiggins
03-24-2005, 08:15 PM
:ROFL: Rose. Cute.

maestrowork
03-24-2005, 09:07 PM
I sent a nice thank you to a top agent who sent me a nice rejection. He wrote back and invited me to send in my other works.

In this business, it's about professionalism and relations...